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Cathy Rigby

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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | March 11, 1993
Former gymnast Cathy Rigby may not be the musical theater's vision of Annie Oakley -- that vision was forged by Ethel Merman, who created the title role in the original 1946 production of "Annie Get Your Gun."Rigby is a different kind of Oakley -- the more realistic, athletic, tomboy kind. It's a little difficult to picture Merman doing some of Oakley's more acrobatic stunts. Not so with Rigby, who not only has her own athletic credentials, she's the same height as pint-sized Oakley.Sure, Merman's voice was a cannon next to Rigby's smaller and, in the lower register, weaker tones.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 11, 2002
For its final full season in the Mechanic Theatre, the Baltimore Center for the Performing Arts has announced that it will return to a six-show lineup in 2002-2003 and that the megahit The Producers will be part of its first season in the renovated Hippodrome in 2004. Highlights of the 2002-2003 series will include The Producers' chief rival for last year's Tony Award, The Full Monty, as well as Charles Busch's hit comedy The Tale of the Allergist's Wife, with Valerie Harper repeating her Broadway role.
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By SYLVIA BADGER | March 12, 1993
"Annie Get Your Gun," starring Cathy Rigby and featuring her children as her brother and sister, opened at the Morris Mechanic Theatre this week with a lot of hoopla.Hope Quackenbush, managing director of the Performing Arts Center, held forth at a gala cast party Wednesday night at the Baltimore Grand. Thanks to Harry Teeter, chairman of the board of the National Theater Foundation, the party was a benefit for Baltimore's Shock Trauma Center.Besides the cast, others attending the party included Roberta Cowley, widow of Shock Trauma founder, Dr. R Adams Cowley; Performing Artsboard members Bob and Sandy Hillman and David and Merle Fishman; and, much to everyone's surprise, beleaguered Dr. Kimball I. Maull, who was recently ousted as head of the state's emergency medical system.
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By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Staff | February 10, 2002
The face of 50 has changed since most of us were kids. Heck, the whole philosophy of 50 has changed. "There's so much more joy associated with this period of life now," says Connie Collins, a contributing editor at More magazine, a publication for women between 40 and 60. "In our mothers' generation, many women felt life was over at 50. The children were grown, and there was nothing left to do. But for this generation, life is just beginning. We're experiencing a rebirth." This year, about 3.5 million baby boomers will turn 50, some fairly famous female mugs among them -- supermodel Beverly Johnson, author Amy Tan, former gymnast Cathy Rigby -- so Collins and the other editors at More decided to develop a book that showed the new look and attitude of the Big Five-O, Fifty Celebrate Fifty (Meredith Books; $30)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | October 28, 1990
Cathy Rigby has a lot to crow about.These days she's crowing eight times a week as the title character in the national tour of "Peter Pan," which begins a one-month run at the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre Tuesday.The production -- now midway through a 58-city tour -- also will mark Ms. Rigby's Broadway debut when it arrives at the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre for a six-week engagement beginning Dec. 11.A two-time Olympic gymnast and the first American woman to win a medal in world gymnastics competition, the 37-year-old mother of four can be proud of her personal life as well.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 19, 1998
Cathy Rigby is really wired, and it's not just a matter of the wire that enables her to fly through the air above the Mechanic Theatre stage in "Peter Pan."The former Olympic gymnast is a petite dynamo. She has more than enough boyish energy to portray that fabled boy who refuses to grow up.Her athletic skills come as no surprise, and by now her theatrical savvy also is well-established. Any doubts there might have been about her singing and acting abilities were resolved when she last flew into the Mechanic as Peter Pan in 1990.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1998
Time for a heartwarming holiday custom: Fall by Baltimore's downtown Post Office, get checked for weapons, camp in a conference room, overhear a postal employee say, "I love the smell of mail in the morning," and read letters to Santa:Dear Santa,I am sorry about how I stole 150 dollers from Mom. I will never do it agian. For Christmas I would like Extreme Godzilla and some hiding places for Walter, my snake. The rest is for you to decide. I'll talk to you next year.Love,RobertEach year, the Post Office receives hundreds of letters addressed to Santa.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 11, 2002
For its final full season in the Mechanic Theatre, the Baltimore Center for the Performing Arts has announced that it will return to a six-show lineup in 2002-2003 and that the megahit The Producers will be part of its first season in the renovated Hippodrome in 2004. Highlights of the 2002-2003 series will include The Producers' chief rival for last year's Tony Award, The Full Monty, as well as Charles Busch's hit comedy The Tale of the Allergist's Wife, with Valerie Harper repeating her Broadway role.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Staff | February 10, 2002
The face of 50 has changed since most of us were kids. Heck, the whole philosophy of 50 has changed. "There's so much more joy associated with this period of life now," says Connie Collins, a contributing editor at More magazine, a publication for women between 40 and 60. "In our mothers' generation, many women felt life was over at 50. The children were grown, and there was nothing left to do. But for this generation, life is just beginning. We're experiencing a rebirth." This year, about 3.5 million baby boomers will turn 50, some fairly famous female mugs among them -- supermodel Beverly Johnson, author Amy Tan, former gymnast Cathy Rigby -- so Collins and the other editors at More decided to develop a book that showed the new look and attitude of the Big Five-O, Fifty Celebrate Fifty (Meredith Books; $30)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | May 8, 2007
Mary Martin was an inimitable Peter Pan; Cathy Rigby imbued the eternal boy with athletic grace; and, in Baltimore, Jefferson Mays brought impish charm to J.M. Barrie's classic at Center Stage four seasons ago. But the most creative take I've seen has to be Peter and Wendy, the magical 1996 rendition by the acclaimed New York-based avant-garde troupe Mabou Mines. Peter and Wendy runs through June 24 at Arena Stage, 1101 Sixth St. S.W., Washington. $55-$74. Call 202-488-3300 or go to arenastage.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1998
Time for a heartwarming holiday custom: Fall by Baltimore's downtown Post Office, get checked for weapons, camp in a conference room, overhear a postal employee say, "I love the smell of mail in the morning," and read letters to Santa:Dear Santa,I am sorry about how I stole 150 dollers from Mom. I will never do it agian. For Christmas I would like Extreme Godzilla and some hiding places for Walter, my snake. The rest is for you to decide. I'll talk to you next year.Love,RobertEach year, the Post Office receives hundreds of letters addressed to Santa.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 19, 1998
Cathy Rigby is really wired, and it's not just a matter of the wire that enables her to fly through the air above the Mechanic Theatre stage in "Peter Pan."The former Olympic gymnast is a petite dynamo. She has more than enough boyish energy to portray that fabled boy who refuses to grow up.Her athletic skills come as no surprise, and by now her theatrical savvy also is well-established. Any doubts there might have been about her singing and acting abilities were resolved when she last flew into the Mechanic as Peter Pan in 1990.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | March 12, 1993
"Annie Get Your Gun," starring Cathy Rigby and featuring her children as her brother and sister, opened at the Morris Mechanic Theatre this week with a lot of hoopla.Hope Quackenbush, managing director of the Performing Arts Center, held forth at a gala cast party Wednesday night at the Baltimore Grand. Thanks to Harry Teeter, chairman of the board of the National Theater Foundation, the party was a benefit for Baltimore's Shock Trauma Center.Besides the cast, others attending the party included Roberta Cowley, widow of Shock Trauma founder, Dr. R Adams Cowley; Performing Artsboard members Bob and Sandy Hillman and David and Merle Fishman; and, much to everyone's surprise, beleaguered Dr. Kimball I. Maull, who was recently ousted as head of the state's emergency medical system.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | March 11, 1993
Former gymnast Cathy Rigby may not be the musical theater's vision of Annie Oakley -- that vision was forged by Ethel Merman, who created the title role in the original 1946 production of "Annie Get Your Gun."Rigby is a different kind of Oakley -- the more realistic, athletic, tomboy kind. It's a little difficult to picture Merman doing some of Oakley's more acrobatic stunts. Not so with Rigby, who not only has her own athletic credentials, she's the same height as pint-sized Oakley.Sure, Merman's voice was a cannon next to Rigby's smaller and, in the lower register, weaker tones.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | October 28, 1990
Cathy Rigby has a lot to crow about.These days she's crowing eight times a week as the title character in the national tour of "Peter Pan," which begins a one-month run at the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre Tuesday.The production -- now midway through a 58-city tour -- also will mark Ms. Rigby's Broadway debut when it arrives at the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre for a six-week engagement beginning Dec. 11.A two-time Olympic gymnast and the first American woman to win a medal in world gymnastics competition, the 37-year-old mother of four can be proud of her personal life as well.
FEATURES
By Barbara Isenberg and Barbara Isenberg,Los Angeles Times | July 9, 1992
It helps sell tickets if a Broadway show on tour is packed with celebrities, but few major stars are eager to hit 30 cities a year.Ask Gary Beach, an actor who has traveled with such shows as "Annie," "Legends!" and "Les Miserables." "When you're in New York," says Mr. Beach, "you go and do the show. It's over at 10:15, and you're out of the theater at 10:30. By 11, you're sitting in your apartment watching 'The Tonight Show.' "Life on the road is a little less comfortable. "You're in a different hotel every other week, and you get very tired of restaurant food very quickly," says Cathy Rigby, who played 60 cities in two years as "Peter Pan" and this week begins a national tour in "Annie Get Your Gun."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Giuliano | November 16, 1990
Moscow CircusWhere: Baltimore Arena, 201 W. Baltimore St.When: Nov. 16, 7:30 p.m.; Nov. 17, 11 a.m., 3:30 p.m. and 8 p.m.; Nov. 18, 1 p.m. and 5:30 p.m.Tickets: $19.50, $16, $12.50 and $10.Call: 481-6000 to charge tickets; 347-2010 for information. Ring-counters will immediately note that the Moscow Circus only has a single ring, unlike the hyper-busy three rings of an American circus. But that single focus of activity, set up at the Baltimore Arena through Sunday, is still bursting with circusThat characteristic aside, there are other things that make this circus distinctively Russian.
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