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NEWS
March 17, 2011
I was disappointed to read that my archdiocese would not support a charter school in a vacant archdiocesan building ("Charters emerge as threats to Catholic schools," March 17). I was equally troubled by Baltimore schools CEO Andrés Alonso's comment that he was happy to be considered "the competition" to archdiocesan schools. As the situation at Tench Tilghman has taught us ("Prayer service at city school called improper," March 14), the philosophies of the two systems are different; however, the goal must be the same.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By William E. Lori | September 28, 2014
This weekend over 700 people were scheduled to attend our 6th annual Archdiocese of Baltimore Gala to raise money for students who otherwise could not afford to attend a Catholic school in the Archdiocese. Since its inception, the gala has raised more than $4.2 million in tuition assistance and endowment for Catholic schools. The gala is just one way the archdiocese is helping children from low-income families benefit from a Catholic school education. Another is the Partners in Excellence (PIE)
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NEWS
March 6, 2010
If the archdiocese had formed a commitee to increase the enrollment of Cardinal Gibbons instead of one to decide how to consolidate it, perhaps they wouldn't be facing this sad day. I will support Catholic soup kitchens and the Catholic Relief Services but not the archdiocese unless it changes it's decision regarding Cardinal Gibbons. Gibbons, Seton-Keough, Archbishop Spalding and Archbishop Curley are the only schools with a mission to serve those who are not rich. When they sell the land to St. Agnes, we will know what truly motivates the hierarchacy, certainly not a commitment to education for all. I repeat -- what would Jesus do?
NEWS
September 3, 2014
In his commentary, "The Civil Right Act at 50" (Aug. 31), Baltimore Archbishop William E. Lori writes that "...our Catholic schools in Baltimore City educate majority non-Catholic, African-American students whose education is heavily subsidized by the Church's private partners seeking to improve lives (and communities) through education. " It seems to me a bit hypocritical for Archbishop Lori to support these commitments when a few years ago, the archdiocese closed so many Catholic schools in Baltimore City where most of the students needed to have the influence of those schools to improve their lives.
NEWS
March 6, 2010
Children's Scholarship Fund Baltimore is Baltimore's only need based, non-denominational program that gives lower income families tuition assistance for their children to attend the elementary school of their choice. Totally dependant on private donations, we are helping over 420 students attend 63 private and parochial schools in and around Baltimore. Students are chosen by lottery, so we are helping a few children from every neighborhood in the city. This school year 43 percent of our families have chosen to send their children to a Catholic school.
NEWS
November 10, 2009
The Archdiocese of Baltimore announced Monday that schools Superintendent Ronald J. Valenti will retire at the end of the school year. Valenti, 66, who has worked for the archdiocese's Catholic schools for nearly 20 years, says the timing is right for him to step down because of the strategic plan being developed by the Blue Ribbon Committee on Schools. "The work being done by the Blue Ribbon Committee is extremely important and will require a long commitment," said Valenti, who added that he wants to remain active in the field of education.
NEWS
By John Swope and Robert Birdsell | May 17, 2010
The Archdiocese of Baltimore has a deep and distinguished history of commitment to urban education in Baltimore, dating back to St. Elizabeth Ann Seton's pioneering work more than 200 years ago. Yet, the rich educational tradition of Catholic education faces formidable challenges on a number of fronts as Archbishop Edwin F. O'Brien leads an ambitious renewal of Catholic education through an organizational reset of archdiocesan schools. The Cristo Rey Network, a national consortium of 24 urban Catholic high schools, has been overcoming these challenges through its new model of education for more than a decade.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch | arthur.hirsch@baltsun.com | March 4, 2010
Facing rising costs and falling enrollments, the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Baltimore will close 13 of its 64 schools at the end of the academic year, officials told employees and families Wednesday. Parents reacted with anguish and anger as word spread that 12 K-8 schools and one high school, Cardinal Gibbons in the Morrell Park neighborhood of West Baltimore, would be shut down in June. All are in Baltimore or Baltimore County. "This is a major blow," Ted Ewachiw said at Sacred Heart of Mary School in East Baltimore, where he picked up his two children after school Wednesday.
NEWS
March 9, 2010
I am an avid sports fan. I love football and hockey and am a novice fan of other sports. As much as I love sports, I have very little patience for the overpaid, greedy, self centered pro athlete. With the impending 2011 NFL work stoppage on the horizon, one has to ask, when is too much money enough? We look at the pure greed in pro sports. The 1981 and 1994 Major League Baseball strikes, the 1992, 1994 and 2004 NHL lockouts, and the NBA lockouts are a testament to the greed in pro sports.
NEWS
September 3, 2014
In his commentary, "The Civil Right Act at 50" (Aug. 31), Baltimore Archbishop William E. Lori writes that "...our Catholic schools in Baltimore City educate majority non-Catholic, African-American students whose education is heavily subsidized by the Church's private partners seeking to improve lives (and communities) through education. " It seems to me a bit hypocritical for Archbishop Lori to support these commitments when a few years ago, the archdiocese closed so many Catholic schools in Baltimore City where most of the students needed to have the influence of those schools to improve their lives.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | January 2, 2014
The remarkable humility of Pope Francis is causing lapsed Catholics to reconsider their relationship with the church, this one included. Those of us who left the church in a huff or drifted away, disillusioned by the scandals or the money, or bristling at the ever more strict requirements to participate, did not do so easily. The church had been a community to which our families - especially our children - were welcome. Until we were not. Until we could not reconcile our consciences with the edicts from the pulpit.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | November 11, 2013
Wearing a tie and a name tag that said "alumni," Brooks Brawner, 14, stood smiling in the gymnasium of St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic School in Hampden on Nov. 8, giving tours at an open house for prospective parents. The Hampden teen, now a freshman at Loyola Blakefield High School, still remembered the feelings of uncertainty he faced as a fifth grader in 2010, at a time when the Catholic Archdiocese of Baltimore was closing 13 of its schools in the Baltimore area to save money and St. Thomas Aquinas was considered on the bubble.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2013
Catholic schools in Baltimore propelled George W. McManus Jr. from poverty to success as a lawyer, he says, providing him a solid education. And years later, when the legal tables turned and he needed defense, priests and school officials were there as character witnesses. Now McManus, 92, plans to leave an $8.5 million bequest to benefit the schools he attended as well as other charities. Officials with the Baltimore Community Foundation expect to distribute the funds for years to come, as the fund would generate an estimated half-million dollars a year in interest.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2013
Anne Arundel County police are investigating sexual abuse allegations by a former student at Monsignor Slade Catholic School in Glen Burnie, officials of the Archdiocese of Baltimore said Wednesday. In a letter posted on the archdiocese website and sent to parents via email Wednesday, Barbara McGraw Edmondson, the superintendent of schools within the archdiocese, said county police searched the school Tuesday afternoon and that those being investigated have been suspended until "a determination is made concerning the veracity of the allegations.
NEWS
By William E. Lori | April 22, 2013
It has been nearly three years since my predecessor, Cardinal Edwin O'Brien, and the Blue Ribbon Committee on Catholic Schools released the Strategic Plan for Catholic schools in the Archdiocese of Baltimore. Since that time, enrollment declines have been stemmed in many schools; innovative new programs such as our dual language and Montessori initiatives have kept our schools competitive; and systemic changes to the governance of our schools, renewed focus on school leadership - training of principals and development of local school boards, as well as system-wide accreditation - are ensuring Catholic schools remain an excellent value (average annual K-8 cost is approximately $5,000)
NEWS
Bob Ehrlich | April 15, 2013
As many of you know, I was born and raised in solidly working class Arbutus. My family's Protestantism qualified us as an anomaly; the majority of the neighborhood kids were Catholic. Most attended local Catholic schools such as Ascension, Our Lady of Victory, and St. Mark's. A majority of them went on to graduate high school at Cardinal Gibbons, Mount St. Joe, or Seton. This school experience provided parents an attractive "three-fer": religious instruction, challenging academics and excellent athletics - at a reasonable price, to boot.
NEWS
March 8, 2010
Baltimore City Councilman Nicholas D'Adamo wants Archbishop Edwin F. O'Brien to rent closed Catholic schools to the city for $1 per year ("Charter schools may emerge from closures," Mar. 8). The archdiocese can't afford to maintain these schools as Catholic Schools. Councilman D'Adamo wants the archdiocese to subsidize the city of Baltimore, when the Archdiocese of Baltimore couldn't afford Catholic Schools. The Catholic School system saves the Baltimore City, Maryland counties, and the state of Maryland millions of dollars.
NEWS
March 4, 2010
The list The Archdiocese of Baltimore will close these schools at the end of the school year: •Ascension School, Halethorpe •St. Bernardine Catholic School, Edmondson Village •Fr. Charles Hall Catholic School (elementary and middle schools), West Baltimore •St. Clare School, Essex •Holy Family School, Randallstown •St. Katharine School, Queen of Peace Cluster, East Baltimore •Mother Mary Lange Catholic School, Northeast Baltimore •Our Lady of Fatima School, East Baltimore •St.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, Baltimore Sun Media Group | March 13, 2013
Gail Liss, the front desk receptionist for Cathedral of Mary Our Queen, went to a dentist appointment at noontime Wednesday, confident that a new pope would not be chosen before she got back to work. Liss was wrong. While she sitting in the dentist chair, she heard on the radio that white smoke had billowed in the Vatican, the traditional sign that a pope had been elected by the Vatican's conclave of cardinals. "I gotta get out of here," she thought. Liss rushed back to the Cathedral office on North Charles Street just in time to see the new pope, Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio of Argentina, introduced.
NEWS
By Christopher B. Summers | March 11, 2013
Anyone hearing the ACLU's position on single-sex education would think something troubling is afoot in almost every town in America. The ACLU claims that single-sex education is an unlawful form of discrimination and that its supposed benefits are based on pseudoscience. In a supposed conspiracy to oppress children, the Catholic Church operates hundreds of single-sex schools across America. A handful of states have opened boys' and girls' schools themselves. The ACLU's lawyers allege that this practice amounts to gender apartheid, a misogynist attempt to hold women back.
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