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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Writer | August 4, 1994
PHILADELPHIA -- Pity the moving man. He stealthily enters the office that is roughly the size of a basketball court, looking over the polished wooden furniture, the thick carpets, the stacks of books and the collectibles of a 30-year Naval career piled high in handcrafted oak cabinets.But he can't get past the admiral's radar.The admiral slowly puts down her fine china coffee cup, arises from her chair, draws a bead on the man and begins talking, first in a whisper, then in a playful shout, her face flushed, her right index finger bobbing up and down in the air, a smile never leaving her lips.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2014
Monsignor Roland Pierre Bordelon, a retired Catholic Relief Services director, died of dementia Dec. 18 at Charlestown Retirement Community. The former Mount Vernon resident was 87. Born in Bordelonville, La., he was the son of Russell and Lillian Dupuis Bordelon. Family members said his hometown was named for an ancestor, a French captain who came to America with the Marquis de Lafayette during the Revolutionary War. He was ordained a priest in 1950 and joined Catholic Relief Services a decade later.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2005
Catholic Relief Services is close to signing a lease to move to the former Stewart's department store in a deal that would bring more than 300 workers to the heart of the city's old retail district. Completing the deal would cap a lengthy search for larger quarters for the international relief arm of the U.S. Roman Catholic Church. The agency has been negotiating with the Stewart building's owner, the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation, to lease most of the redeveloped but still vacant Stewart's building except for the first-floor retail space.
NEWS
By Carolyn Woo | April 25, 2013
Malaria is an enormous and tragic problem - that can be beat. It takes the life of a child every minute in Sub-Saharan Africa, and a million people die from malaria each year. It also stifles economic development, as malaria prevents children from attending school and adults from working. Today is World Malaria Day, and I am pleased to celebrate the lives saved and enriched by recent attention and investments. Not that many years ago, this would be an occasion for hand-wringing and lamenting the many victims of this disease and wishing we could get the world to do more.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2004
Catholic Relief Services has narrowed its search for a new headquarters to three downtown sites - adhering to its promise of remaining in the city - and the charity hopes to be able to announce a decision by fall, officials said yesterday. "We're still on the hunt," Patrick C. Johns, director of administrative services for Catholic Relief, said yesterday. "We're keeping our pledge to stay in the city. We would have liked to have locked on to something earlier than now. One of our difficulties is the buildings here in the city are either too big or too small."
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 19, 1993
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- Several thousand tons of food meant for three-quarters of a million poor Haitians is stuck at the capital port because of the rising violence here, directors of the three largest food relief programs say.The directors of CARE, Catholic Relief Services and Adventist Development and Relief Agency said the stoppage and the unease has forced them to postpone trips to the countryside and around Port-au-Prince.In addition, they said the United Nations embargo will further hurt them.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun architecture critic | November 18, 2007
The leaders of Catholic Relief Services say the organization only does relief work outside the United States, but that's not entirely true. Anyone who visits its new world headquarters at Howard and Lexington streets can see how much the international relief and development agency, which is active in 100 countries from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe, also has aided the west side of downtown Baltimore. By moving 350 employees to the center of the city's traditional retail district, Catholic Relief put them in a position to patronize the shops, restaurants and other businesses in every direction.
NEWS
By SCOTT CALVERT and SCOTT CALVERT,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | February 18, 2006
BIL BIL, Kenya -- Halima Hussein has to walk two miles to fetch water for her family, and for that she is grateful. Until 2002 the women of this village walked eight miles to the murky, crocodile-infested Tana River, then walked eight miles back home with donkeys carrying the water jugs. "From the heart I am very happy," Hussein said, standing in 105-degree heat at an earthen dam, where a hand pump pulls cold water through a gravel purifier. The four-year-old dam is a manmade oasis, now of critical importance because of a drought scorching much of East Africa.
NEWS
March 14, 2004
THERE IS A SMALL program in Iraq that has shown the potential to do a lot of good. A group of nonprofit agencies is using $70 million in U.S. aid money to organize local communities to decide for themselves what sort of small-scale reconstruction work they want done - and then they do it. The program is a modest but promising step toward building a civil society in a country that has never had one. The Bush administration wants to choke it off. That...
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Staff Writer | August 28, 1993
There are no more half-dead skeletons wandering the streets of Baidoa, in Somalia; the green sorghum stands 8-feet-high in the countryside where a year ago there was nothing but dust.As reports of a deteriorating security situation for allied troops continue to come out of the country, the Rev. William P. Joy, acting head of the Catholic Relief Service, has brought back evidence that the primary purpose of the United Nations expedition to Somalia at least has been served, evidence that the great famine is over and communal life in some regions outside Mogadishu is returning to normal.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2012
Jean Gartlan, a retired journalist and a Catholic Relief Services program director who worked in 1960s refugee relief in southern Africa, died of cancer Sunday at Stella Maris Hospice. She was 88 and lived in Mount Vernon. "She was really a Renaissance woman," said Ken Hackett, former Catholic Relief Services president. "She was literary and traveled the world. She did some remarkable behind-the-scenes things, and ... you never knew she was there. " Born in New York City and raised in Washington Heights, she earned an English degree at the College of Mount St. Vincent and a second bachelor's degree, in journalism, from Columbia University.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2012
Robert W. "Bob" Roche, a former Peace Corps volunteer who later worked in Africa with Catholic Relief Services, died Jan. 12 of undetermined causes at Sanctuary at Holy Cross, a Burtonsville senior living community. The Columbia resident was 61. "We are awaiting the results of an autopsy as to the cause of death," said his son, Robert L. Roche, who lives in Washington. Robert Winslow "Bob" Roche was born and raised in Monroeville, Pa., where he graduated in 1968 from Gateway Senior High School.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2012
As a teenager attending a Catholic school in Hong Kong in the 1960s, Carolyn Y. Woo never imagined that her studies were helping prepare her to one day lead Baltimore-based Catholic Relief Services, one of the world's largest international humanitarian relief agencies. Woo took over this month as CRS' chief executive officer and president, replacing 18-year veteran Ken Hackett. Woo, 57, brings an academic and business background to her job, having most recently served as dean of the University of Notre Dame's Mendoza College of Business.
NEWS
By Ken Hackett and Carolyn Woo | January 11, 2012
Two years ago, an enormous earthquake devastated Haiti's capital, Port-au-Prince, and the surrounding areas. While the cameras are gone, Haiti's recovery continues. Having recently visited Port-au-Prince, we can report that much has been accomplished - though the most important successes are not so obvious. As images of death and destruction dominated the post-disaster news coverage, compassionate Americans donated hundreds of millions of dollars to humanitarian organizations like ours, Baltimore-based Catholic Relief Services.
NEWS
By Rebecca Hamilton, Special to The Washington Post | March 26, 2011
The Sudanese government is preventing aid organizations from delivering food and health services to hundreds of thousands of people in the conflict-ridden Darfur region of the country, according to Baltimore-based Catholic Relief Services, one of the largest remaining groups there. The crackdown has left displaced populations at risk of disease and malnutrition as the government increases military operations in the area. Catholic Relief Services was forced to suspend its work in West Darfur state after the government told it to leave Jan. 20, the organization's country director, Darren Hercyk, said in an interview.
BUSINESS
By Baltimore Sun reporter | April 15, 2010
An auction of the former Catholic Relief Services headquarters at 209 W. Fayette St. in Baltimore was canceled at the request of the mortgage holder, according to auctioneer Paul Cooper of Alex Cooper Auctioneers. The auction, which had been scheduled for today, would have been a foreclosure sale on behalf of People's Bank of York, Pa. The building owner, an investment group called 209 West Fayette LLC, had negotiated a contract to lease about 56,000 square feet of space in the seven-story building for five years to the VA Maryland Health Care System, an affiliate of the U. S. Department of Veterans Affairs.
NEWS
March 24, 1992
CARE Inc., the world's largest non-profit relief agency, is considering relocating its global headquarters from New York to Baltimore.Of course, Baltimore is not the only city under consideration, even though it reportedly is on the organization's short list of alternatives. But this in itself is a reflection of the appeal that this city increasingly has for non-profit organizations wanting to have a location -- and relatively cheap office space -- close to Washington.The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People moved here from New York in 1985; Catholic Relief Services came from New York in 1988; the American Center for International Leadership transferred from Columbus, Ind., in 1990; the International Book Bank and the Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity left Chicago last year.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer | December 8, 1992
Catholic Relief Service workers just returned to their Baltimore headquarters from Somalia said yesterday they believe the presence of U.S. troops will effectively inhibit the armed bands that have blocked distribution of humanitarian aid to starving thousands of Somalis."
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella | February 5, 2010
W.R. Grace and Co. handed out hundreds of snow scrapers to employees last winter, and this year put out "shoe grippers" at its office entryways. Both the scrapers and the grippers, which slide over shoes, will likely be put to good use today. Like many big employers around the Baltimore area, the Columbia-based maker of chemicals and sealants was monitoring storm forecasts Thursday and preparing to shut down if the snow starts in the middle of today, as predicted. "We're encouraging folks to take laptops home in case the storm arrives sooner than forecasters are predicting," said Andrea Greenan, a Grace spokeswoman.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | January 15, 2010
On an ordinary day, Katie Goldsmith would be monitoring political and security conditions in West Africa from Catholic Relief Services' Baltimore headquarters. But on Thursday, with Haitians still waiting for international help in recovering from the earthquake that leveled Port-au-Prince, Goldsmith was working the phones at the agency, trying to find a port where it could begin landing food, medicine and supplies in the Caribbean nation of 9 million. "We've heard that the commercial port in Port-au-Prince is nonoperable," Goldsmith said in between calls.
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