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By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Roman Catholics, particularly public officials, who support abortion rights cannot be considered faithful members of the church, the nation's bishops said in a document they approved yesterday.In the strongly worded "Living the Gospel of Life: A Challenge to American Catholics," the members of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops said that Catholic politicians who say they oppose abortion but are reluctant to foist their views on constituents are "seriously mistaken.""No public official, especially one claiming to be a faithful and serious Catholic, can responsibly advocate for or actively support direct attacks on innocent human life," the document said.
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NEWS
By Doyle McManus | June 8, 2011
Of the 44 U.S. presidents, all but a handful have been affiliated with a relatively narrow list of traditional Protestant denominations. Eleven were Episcopalians (12 if you count Thomas Jefferson, whose adult beliefs are a subject of debate), eight were Presbyterians, four were Methodists and four were Baptists. Others included Congregationalists, Dutch Reformed and Disciples of Christ. President Barack Obama attended Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago, a congregation with traditional Protestant roots despite its untraditional pastor, the Rev. Jeremiah A. Wright Jr. In Washington, Mr. Obama has attended services at mostly black Protestant churches.
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NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 18, 2006
LOS ANGELES -- It is one of the most sensitive questions American Catholic bishops have wrestled with the past few years: When Catholic public officials do not follow church teachings, should they be denied Holy Communion? So it was no surprise when the question was posed to Washington's cardinal, Theodore E. McCarrick, after he addressed bishops last week on the topic of Catholic politicians. Many bishops have talked to Catholic lawmakers whose views clash with the church, said Archbishop Elden F. Curtiss, of Omaha, Neb. "After we've made the effort, what do we do if the conclusion is not positive?"
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,Sun reporter | July 14, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Archbishop Edwin F. O'Brien had barely moved in before he got orders to ship out. The Archdiocese of Military Services opened its new headquarters in Washington in May, and the prelate still had boxes of books and mementos to unpack from a 42-year career as priest, seminary rector, military chaplain and close aide to two cardinals. But there's no need to empty them now. O'Brien, whose appointment as the new archbishop of Baltimore was announced Thursday, will move into the residence at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen in Roland Park before his October installation.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tracy Wilkinson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 10, 2007
SAO PAULO, Brazil -- Beginning his first papal pilgrimage to the Americas, Pope Benedict XVI issued a strong condemnation yesterday of abortion and set off a firestorm by suggesting that Catholic politicians who legalize it have excommunicated themselves from the church. Pope Benedict arrived in Brazil, the largest Catholic country in the world, and confronted a continent whose once-universal Catholicism has been eroded and whose church is profoundly divided. Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva welcomed the pope in a small ceremony inside a cavernous military airport hangar.
NEWS
May 26, 2004
CATHOLIC BISHOPS can say what they want in ministering to their flocks. But when they refuse to serve politicians Communion because they hold views antithetical to church teachings, bishops are wielding a holy sacrament as a clumsy, political weapon. Publicly sanctioning parishioners -- whether they are a presidential candidate, a schoolteacher, or a factory worker -- for their political beliefs may be within the bounds of canon law, but it serves neither the church nor democracy well.
NEWS
By GEORGE WEIGEL | May 2, 1995
Washington. -- In his recent encyclical ''Evangelium Vitae'' (''The Gospel of Life''), Pope John Paul II expressed a profound compassion for women caught in the dilemma of unwanted pregnancy.Irresponsible and predatory men, economic and social pressures, fear and confusion can lead to situations in which, the pope writes, the weight of responsibility for depriving the unborn child of the right to life falls less heavily on a woman in grave psychological distress than on ''those who have directly or indirectly obliged her to have an abortion.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2004
Weighing in for the first time on a controversial, election-year issue, the leadership of the U.S. Catholic Church said yesterday that it is up to individual bishops to decide whether to give or deny communion to Catholic politicians who support abortion rights, such as Sen. John Kerry, the presumptive Democrat presidential nominee. "Given the wide range of circumstances involved in arriving at a prudential judgment on a matter of this seriousness, we recognize that such decisions rest with the individual bishop," the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops said in a statement at a week-long, private retreat in Colorado that ends today.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 24, 2004
WASHINGTON - Sen. John Kerry, a former Roman Catholic altar boy, reasserted his defense of women's right to an abortion yesterday as a Vatican official called on priests to stop granting Communion to politicians who vote for abortion rights. The confluence of a high-profile speech on behalf of women's rights and the declaration by Cardinal Francis Arinze in Rome escalated Kerry's uneasy relationship with the church over abortion. It also raised new questions about the relationship between religious and political convictions, an issue that has also dogged President Bush.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 5, 2004
NEW YORK - In the view of the nation's Roman Catholic bishops, politicians who belong to the church but depart from its teachings on abortion should be denied honors from a Catholic institution. Unless, some would say, you happen to be a national hero of Sept. 11 who has raised a lot of money for a church-affiliated hospital. That would be the former mayor of New York, Rudolph W. Giuliani, an abortion rights supporter, whose name will grace a new $25 million trauma center at St. Vincent's Hospital in Manhattan.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tracy Wilkinson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 10, 2007
SAO PAULO, Brazil -- Beginning his first papal pilgrimage to the Americas, Pope Benedict XVI issued a strong condemnation yesterday of abortion and set off a firestorm by suggesting that Catholic politicians who legalize it have excommunicated themselves from the church. Pope Benedict arrived in Brazil, the largest Catholic country in the world, and confronted a continent whose once-universal Catholicism has been eroded and whose church is profoundly divided. Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva welcomed the pope in a small ceremony inside a cavernous military airport hangar.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 18, 2006
LOS ANGELES -- It is one of the most sensitive questions American Catholic bishops have wrestled with the past few years: When Catholic public officials do not follow church teachings, should they be denied Holy Communion? So it was no surprise when the question was posed to Washington's cardinal, Theodore E. McCarrick, after he addressed bishops last week on the topic of Catholic politicians. Many bishops have talked to Catholic lawmakers whose views clash with the church, said Archbishop Elden F. Curtiss, of Omaha, Neb. "After we've made the effort, what do we do if the conclusion is not positive?"
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 5, 2004
NEW YORK - In the view of the nation's Roman Catholic bishops, politicians who belong to the church but depart from its teachings on abortion should be denied honors from a Catholic institution. Unless, some would say, you happen to be a national hero of Sept. 11 who has raised a lot of money for a church-affiliated hospital. That would be the former mayor of New York, Rudolph W. Giuliani, an abortion rights supporter, whose name will grace a new $25 million trauma center at St. Vincent's Hospital in Manhattan.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2004
Weighing in for the first time on a controversial, election-year issue, the leadership of the U.S. Catholic Church said yesterday that it is up to individual bishops to decide whether to give or deny communion to Catholic politicians who support abortion rights, such as Sen. John Kerry, the presumptive Democrat presidential nominee. "Given the wide range of circumstances involved in arriving at a prudential judgment on a matter of this seriousness, we recognize that such decisions rest with the individual bishop," the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops said in a statement at a week-long, private retreat in Colorado that ends today.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2004
Addressing a national controversy for the first time, Baltimore's Cardinal William H. Keeler said he opposes an attempt by some bishops to politicize Communion and deny the sacrament to Catholic politicians who support abortion rights. Keeler said in an interview this week that it was not the business of bishops to choose who receives Communion. Instead, he said he supports church policy that individual Catholics should determine whether they are in a state of grace with the church before partaking in the Eucharist, the heart of Catholic worship.
NEWS
May 26, 2004
CATHOLIC BISHOPS can say what they want in ministering to their flocks. But when they refuse to serve politicians Communion because they hold views antithetical to church teachings, bishops are wielding a holy sacrament as a clumsy, political weapon. Publicly sanctioning parishioners -- whether they are a presidential candidate, a schoolteacher, or a factory worker -- for their political beliefs may be within the bounds of canon law, but it serves neither the church nor democracy well.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2004
Addressing a national controversy for the first time, Baltimore's Cardinal William H. Keeler said he opposes an attempt by some bishops to politicize Communion and deny the sacrament to Catholic politicians who support abortion rights. Keeler said in an interview this week that it was not the business of bishops to choose who receives Communion. Instead, he said he supports church policy that individual Catholics should determine whether they are in a state of grace with the church before partaking in the Eucharist, the heart of Catholic worship.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | April 28, 2004
ARLINGTON, Va. - Sen. John Kerry made a familiar statement about abortion last week. President Bill Clinton said it before him. Many Democrats who wish to remain in the good graces as well as the political clutches of the abortion-rights lobby say it. Mr. Kerry said he wants to keep abortion "safe, legal and rare." I understand "safe" (though it's never safe for the baby and often not the woman). I understand "legal" (though contemporary jurisprudence is shifting sand). I don't understand "rare."
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2004
As a debate swirls in the Catholic Church over how to treat Catholic politicians who back abortion rights, Mount St. Mary's College has withdrawn an offer of an honorary degree to White House counsel Alberto Gonzales after a campus protest over his support for the death penalty. The reversal came after some students and faculty asked that Gonzales, a potential Supreme Court candidate, not speak at the Catholic college's commencement May 23 because of his record on the death penalty, said Mount St. Mary's President Thomas H. Powell.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | April 28, 2004
ARLINGTON, Va. - Sen. John Kerry made a familiar statement about abortion last week. President Bill Clinton said it before him. Many Democrats who wish to remain in the good graces as well as the political clutches of the abortion-rights lobby say it. Mr. Kerry said he wants to keep abortion "safe, legal and rare." I understand "safe" (though it's never safe for the baby and often not the woman). I understand "legal" (though contemporary jurisprudence is shifting sand). I don't understand "rare."
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