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By Jeff Barker and Sarah Koenig and Jeff Barker and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2001
The 600 lobbyists in Annapolis all have bosses, but the Maryland Catholic Conference claims to answer to a higher authority. That could explain why some people find its role mysterious. Is its executive director -the angular, imposing Richard J. Dowling - a member of the clergy? Even after his 17 years of service, some General Assembly members aren't sure. He occasionally gets notes addressed to "Father Dowling." In fact, Dowilng, 60, is not a priest but a lobbyist - and one of the most knowledgeable in the State House.
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NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley's same-sex marriage bill is set for a vote in a key Senate panel Tuesday, the next step after a drama-filled week in which the measure passed the House of Delegates by a narrow margin. Political observers are not expecting such suspense in the Senate. A similar bill passed last year, 25- 21, with one member not voting. "You feel better because the Senate has already taken a vote," said Carrie Evans, the executive director of Equality Maryland, a gay-rights group pushing the bill.
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NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Sarah Koenig and Jeff Barker and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2001
The 600 lobbyists in Annapolis all have bosses, but the Maryland Catholic Conference claims to answer to a higher authority. That could explain why some people find its role mysterious. Is its executive director - the angular, imposing Richard J. Dowling - a member of the clergy? Even after his 17 years of service, some General Assembly members aren't sure; he occasionally gets notes addressed to "Father Dowling." In fact, Dowling, 60, is not a priest but a lobbyist - and one of the most knowledgeable in the State House.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn | katherine.dunn@baltsun.com | January 29, 2010
In nearly 10 years as football chairman for the Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association, Steve Walker has seen the difficulties the six A Conference teams can experience trying to fill out a 10-week schedule with competitive opponents. One of the possible solutions, he said, would be a merger with the Washington Catholic Athletic Conference. The combination would create an exceptionally competitive football conference joining such Washington-area powerhouses as DeMatha, Good Counsel and St. John's with Gilman, McDonogh, Loyola, Calvert Hall, Mount St. Joseph and Georgetown Prep.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | October 23, 2008
The Maryland Catholic Conference, which has taken a hard-line stance on social issues including abortion and gay marriage, said yesterday that it opposed slot-machine gambling in the state but encouraged its faithful to make up their own minds. The Roman Catholic organization reiterated an anti-slots stance it has held for years. But in a two-page background paper that will be distributed to pastors for use in their parishes, the group conceded that "Catholic voters may legitimately disagree" and urged them to go to the polls as educated voters.
FEATURES
By George W. Cornell and George W. Cornell,AP Religion Writer | September 28, 1990
NEW YORK -- Religious leaders yesterday condemned a new movie rating system as pandering to "sexually exploitative material."The church officials urged the Motion Picture Association of America to reconsider its action replacing the "X" rating with the new "No Children" or "NC-17" rating."
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Staff Writer | February 17, 1993
The Maryland State Teachers Association has accused the Archdiocese of Baltimore of taking part in an attack on public schools in an attempt "to win tax support for Catholic schools."The charge comes after a representative of the Maryland Catholic Conference testified Friday in Annapolis in favor of Gov. William Donald Schaefer's plan to give 200 poor families in Baltimore money for private or parochial school tuition.But archdiocesan officials deny any effort to smear public schools, saying they support the governor's proposal as a way to offer more educational choice to inner-city parents.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2005
The House of Delegates approved yesterday a divisive bill to channel $23 million a year to embryonic stem cell research, voting 81-53 after an emotional debate in which numerous delegates came forward to explain their votes before the final roll call. Del. Sally Y. Jameson, a Charles County Democrat, said her vote in favor of the bill was "personal," explaining that she has an artificial pancreas because she suffers from Type 1 diabetes. "My future doesn't look so good," said Jameson, going on to say she fears that her 6-year-old granddaughter will one day have the same disease.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | November 26, 1996
Representatives from Jewish schools in Baltimore and Baltimore County agreed yesterday to join Maryland's Catholic schools in their campaign seeking public money for private education."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 25, 1999
Roman Catholic bishops in the United States have called on the federal government, other wealthy governments and international lending agencies to grant debt relief to the world's poorest nations, so those nations can spend more of their resources on their citizens, rather than on repaying loans.In the 19-page statement, released Friday, the bishops link their call to the approach of the year 2000, which a growing number of religious leaders, including Pope John Paul II and some secular organizations, have said ought to be the occasion of a "jubilee," a concept envisioned in the Book of Leviticus as a time of financial relief for the poor.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | October 23, 2008
The Maryland Catholic Conference, which has taken a hard-line stance on social issues including abortion and gay marriage, said yesterday that it opposed slot-machine gambling in the state but encouraged its faithful to make up their own minds. The Roman Catholic organization reiterated an anti-slots stance it has held for years. But in a two-page background paper that will be distributed to pastors for use in their parishes, the group conceded that "Catholic voters may legitimately disagree" and urged them to go to the polls as educated voters.
NEWS
May 10, 2008
Maryland Legislation Catholic group urges veto of marriage bills The Maryland Catholic Conference called on Gov. Martin O'Malley yesterday to veto two bills the group contends would undermine the legal status of marriage in Maryland. The bills would grant couples who declare themselves domestic partners, which can include same-sex partners, some of the rights of married couples. One bill would exempt domestic partners from paying transfer taxes when adding each other to home property deeds to create joint ownership, a right that married couples have.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2005
The House of Delegates approved yesterday a divisive bill to channel $23 million a year to embryonic stem cell research, voting 81-53 after an emotional debate in which numerous delegates came forward to explain their votes before the final roll call. Del. Sally Y. Jameson, a Charles County Democrat, said her vote in favor of the bill was "personal," explaining that she has an artificial pancreas because she suffers from Type 1 diabetes. "My future doesn't look so good," said Jameson, going on to say she fears that her 6-year-old granddaughter will one day have the same disease.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2005
After a lively debate that included alternate charges of "promoting the radical homosexual agenda" and being "homophobic," the Senate passed a bill yesterday to give medical decision-making rights to all unmarried couples who sign onto a domestic registry. The 31-16 vote came after two days of heated debate and marks a significant step toward the bill becoming law. The House of Delegates overwhelmingly passed a similar bill last year and passage is expected again in that chamber. The Senate's wide margin of approval yesterday was seen as a victory for the gay and lesbian rights community, which was championing the bill as a top priority this year.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Sarah Koenig and Jeff Barker and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2001
The 600 lobbyists in Annapolis all have bosses, but the Maryland Catholic Conference claims to answer to a higher authority. That could explain why some people find its role mysterious. Is its executive director -the angular, imposing Richard J. Dowling - a member of the clergy? Even after his 17 years of service, some General Assembly members aren't sure. He occasionally gets notes addressed to "Father Dowling." In fact, Dowilng, 60, is not a priest but a lobbyist - and one of the most knowledgeable in the State House.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Sarah Koenig and Jeff Barker and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2001
The 600 lobbyists in Annapolis all have bosses, but the Maryland Catholic Conference claims to answer to a higher authority. That could explain why some people find its role mysterious. Is its executive director - the angular, imposing Richard J. Dowling - a member of the clergy? Even after his 17 years of service, some General Assembly members aren't sure; he occasionally gets notes addressed to "Father Dowling." In fact, Dowling, 60, is not a priest but a lobbyist - and one of the most knowledgeable in the State House.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2005
After a lively debate that included alternate charges of "promoting the radical homosexual agenda" and being "homophobic," the Senate passed a bill yesterday to give medical decision-making rights to all unmarried couples who sign onto a domestic registry. The 31-16 vote came after two days of heated debate and marks a significant step toward the bill becoming law. The House of Delegates overwhelmingly passed a similar bill last year and passage is expected again in that chamber. The Senate's wide margin of approval yesterday was seen as a victory for the gay and lesbian rights community, which was championing the bill as a top priority this year.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1996
Catholic school parents across Maryland are writing letters to the governor in the first volley of a campaign by the Maryland Catholic Conference to get public dollars for private schools.Parents of the 60,000 children in the state's 179 Roman Catholic schools are asking Gov. Parris N. Glendening to put money in his fiscal 1998 budget to support transportation, textbooks and technology for students in nonpublic schools."The governor knows how many parents are out there. This is an effort to tell their story," said Mary Ellen Russell, associate director at the conference, the lobbying arm of the three dioceses with schools and churches in Maryland.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 25, 1999
Roman Catholic bishops in the United States have called on the federal government, other wealthy governments and international lending agencies to grant debt relief to the world's poorest nations, so those nations can spend more of their resources on their citizens, rather than on repaying loans.In the 19-page statement, released Friday, the bishops link their call to the approach of the year 2000, which a growing number of religious leaders, including Pope John Paul II and some secular organizations, have said ought to be the occasion of a "jubilee," a concept envisioned in the Book of Leviticus as a time of financial relief for the poor.
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