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By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The nation's Roman Catholic bishops, meeting here this week, will consider today a proposal to implement stricter supervision over U.S. Catholic colleges and universities -- a plan that critics say threatens the American tradition of academic freedom.The proposal, which could come up for a vote this morning, would require university presidents to take an oath of fidelity to uphold Catholic tradition. It states that the majority of the faculty and the board of directors in Catholic colleges and universities should be members of the church "to the extent possible."
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NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | April 17, 2008
Pope Benedict XVI's highly anticipated address today to more than 200 leaders of U.S. Catholic colleges has renewed a debate that is as old as their origins: How do Catholic institutions of higher education balance their religious identity with academic freedom? Catholic colleges were founded upon the principle that faith and reason are essential in the pursuit of knowledge. But at times, the two ideals have clashed, with conservative Catholics condemning some curricula and opposing such campus activities as gay student groups, commencement speakers who support abortion rights, and stage productions of The Vagina Monologues.
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NEWS
October 1, 1990
When the Vatican began drawing up new guidelines for Catholic higher education more than a decade ago, there was reason for unease in many Catholic colleges and universities in this country. How far would the Vatican want to push its authority over these institutions, which must function in a country where intellectual freedom is a prerequisite to academic respectability?As it turns out, the guidelines issued last week strike a generall conciliatory tone. The paper calls on Catholic schools to stay faithful to church teaching and to their religious character.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | February 18, 2004
A group that promotes conservative values at Catholic universities and colleges is targeting several Maryland schools in its nationwide protest against the controversial play The Vagina Monologues. A full-page advertisement in Tuesday's USA Today is headlined: "Scandal! Notre Dame, Georgetown, Boston College, Holy Cross, Loyola, DePaul and 24 more Catholic colleges to host X-rated `play' that glorifies child seduction and other horrors." The advertisement also criticizes by name secular colleges it says are planning productions of the Monologues by Eve Ensler in the next four to six weeks, including the Johns Hopkins University, Towson University and University of Maryland.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | November 18, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The nation's Roman Catholic bishops overwhelmingly approved yesterday guidelines that strengthen their supervision of Catholic colleges and universities in their dioceses, despite concerns of college presidents and theologians about infringement on academic freedom.The document, which seeks to strengthen the religious identity of the nation's approximately 240 Catholic colleges and universities, was passed by a vote of 223 to 31, with one abstention, after an hour-long debate.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 25, 2003
YPSILANTI, Mich. - In a former elementary school gym, framed by green-tiled walls lined with pictures of the saints and the Passion of Christ, Nicole Myshak begins the Angelus, an ancient prayer better known to her grandmother's generation. "The angel of the Lord declared unto Mary," the 24-year-old intones. "And she conceived of the Holy Spirit," respond classmates and teachers who fill the college chapel. The prayer is followed by a solemn Mass, a daily high point at Ave Maria College, one of a small but growing number of liberal arts colleges that promote traditional Roman Catholicism.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | April 17, 2008
Pope Benedict XVI's highly anticipated address today to more than 200 leaders of U.S. Catholic colleges has renewed a debate that is as old as their origins: How do Catholic institutions of higher education balance their religious identity with academic freedom? Catholic colleges were founded upon the principle that faith and reason are essential in the pursuit of knowledge. But at times, the two ideals have clashed, with conservative Catholics condemning some curricula and opposing such campus activities as gay student groups, commencement speakers who support abortion rights, and stage productions of The Vagina Monologues.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | April 21, 1999
Two Latin words -- ex corde -- are getting a lot of attention on the campuses of Catholic colleges and universities these days.They are the first two words of a nearly decade-old church document issued by the Vatican dealing with the relationship between these institutions and the church.A proposal to turn the abstract ideas of that document into concrete policy has many college leaders concerned."I think it would turn what has been a moral relationship into a legal relationship," said the Rev. Harold E. Ridley, president of Loyola College.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | February 18, 2004
A group that promotes conservative values at Catholic universities and colleges is targeting several Maryland schools in its nationwide protest against the controversial play The Vagina Monologues. A full-page advertisement in Tuesday's USA Today is headlined: "Scandal! Notre Dame, Georgetown, Boston College, Holy Cross, Loyola, DePaul and 24 more Catholic colleges to host X-rated `play' that glorifies child seduction and other horrors." The advertisement also criticizes by name secular colleges it says are planning productions of the Monologues by Eve Ensler in the next four to six weeks, including the Johns Hopkins University, Towson University and University of Maryland.
NEWS
By John-Thor Dahlburg and John-Thor Dahlburg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 27, 2002
IMMOKALEE, Fla. - On pool-table-flat farmland where peppers, tomatoes and sod have been grown, Thomas S. Monaghan, 65 and one-time fast-food magnate, is pursuing what might be the last phase of his life's work: the saving of souls. "My No. 1 priority now is to help as many people get to heaven as possible," said the founder of Domino's Pizza and former owner of the Detroit Tigers. "I believe the best way to do that is education." The result, if Monaghan's vision and an artist's conceptions are translated into reality, will be the first new Roman Catholic university in the United States in a generation, built from scratch on what is now rich agricultural land near the Everglades of southwestern Florida.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 25, 2003
YPSILANTI, Mich. - In a former elementary school gym, framed by green-tiled walls lined with pictures of the saints and the Passion of Christ, Nicole Myshak begins the Angelus, an ancient prayer better known to her grandmother's generation. "The angel of the Lord declared unto Mary," the 24-year-old intones. "And she conceived of the Holy Spirit," respond classmates and teachers who fill the college chapel. The prayer is followed by a solemn Mass, a daily high point at Ave Maria College, one of a small but growing number of liberal arts colleges that promote traditional Roman Catholicism.
NEWS
By John-Thor Dahlburg and John-Thor Dahlburg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 27, 2002
IMMOKALEE, Fla. - On pool-table-flat farmland where peppers, tomatoes and sod have been grown, Thomas S. Monaghan, 65 and one-time fast-food magnate, is pursuing what might be the last phase of his life's work: the saving of souls. "My No. 1 priority now is to help as many people get to heaven as possible," said the founder of Domino's Pizza and former owner of the Detroit Tigers. "I believe the best way to do that is education." The result, if Monaghan's vision and an artist's conceptions are translated into reality, will be the first new Roman Catholic university in the United States in a generation, built from scratch on what is now rich agricultural land near the Everglades of southwestern Florida.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | November 18, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The nation's Roman Catholic bishops overwhelmingly approved yesterday guidelines that strengthen their supervision of Catholic colleges and universities in their dioceses, despite concerns of college presidents and theologians about infringement on academic freedom.The document, which seeks to strengthen the religious identity of the nation's approximately 240 Catholic colleges and universities, was passed by a vote of 223 to 31, with one abstention, after an hour-long debate.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The nation's Roman Catholic bishops, meeting here this week, will consider today a proposal to implement stricter supervision over U.S. Catholic colleges and universities -- a plan that critics say threatens the American tradition of academic freedom.The proposal, which could come up for a vote this morning, would require university presidents to take an oath of fidelity to uphold Catholic tradition. It states that the majority of the faculty and the board of directors in Catholic colleges and universities should be members of the church "to the extent possible."
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | April 21, 1999
Two Latin words -- ex corde -- are getting a lot of attention on the campuses of Catholic colleges and universities these days.They are the first two words of a nearly decade-old church document issued by the Vatican dealing with the relationship between these institutions and the church.A proposal to turn the abstract ideas of that document into concrete policy has many college leaders concerned."I think it would turn what has been a moral relationship into a legal relationship," said the Rev. Harold E. Ridley, president of Loyola College.
NEWS
October 1, 1990
When the Vatican began drawing up new guidelines for Catholic higher education more than a decade ago, there was reason for unease in many Catholic colleges and universities in this country. How far would the Vatican want to push its authority over these institutions, which must function in a country where intellectual freedom is a prerequisite to academic respectability?As it turns out, the guidelines issued last week strike a generall conciliatory tone. The paper calls on Catholic schools to stay faithful to church teaching and to their religious character.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | May 24, 2005
BALTIMORE Cardinal William H. Keeler refused to attend graduation at Loyola College last Friday because the personal and political beliefs of the commencement speaker, former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani, go against the teachings of the church. Mr. Giuliani, I know just how you feel. I am not welcome to speak at any of the Catholic schools in the archdiocese, either, because I have written in support of comprehensive sex education and the use of condoms by sexually active teenagers. Giuliani supports the right to abortion, and because of that, the archdiocese refused to send so much as the parish house cleaning lady to the Catholic college as its representative.
NEWS
November 26, 1995
Padgett Business Services offers $500 scholarshipHigh school seniors who are children of business owners are eligible to apply for a $500 scholarship offered by Padgett Business Services.Applicants must be high school seniors who plan to attend a post-secondary accredited institution.The legal guardian of the student must be an active owner of at least 10 percent of stock or capital in a local business that employs fewer than 20 people.Regional winners will be eligible for a grand prize scholarship of $4,000.
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