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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 29, 2008
Penelope stars Christina Ricci as Penelope Wilhern, a blue-blood born with a pig's snout because of a curse put on the Wilhern clan when it refused to let one of her 19th-century forebears marry a servant girl. She can break the curse only when a fellow aristocrat vows to love her for life, so her mother (Catherine O'Hara) hides her away in the family manse until she's of a marriageable age. Not even the most careful preparation can keep a succession of upper-class twits from jumping out a second-story window when they finally clap eyes on her. The movie is about what happens after one of those marital petitioners (Simon Woods)
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 29, 2008
Penelope stars Christina Ricci as Penelope Wilhern, a blue-blood born with a pig's snout because of a curse put on the Wilhern clan when it refused to let one of her 19th-century forebears marry a servant girl. She can break the curse only when a fellow aristocrat vows to love her for life, so her mother (Catherine O'Hara) hides her away in the family manse until she's of a marriageable age. Not even the most careful preparation can keep a succession of upper-class twits from jumping out a second-story window when they finally clap eyes on her. The movie is about what happens after one of those marital petitioners (Simon Woods)
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By Gene Seymour and Gene Seymour,NEWSDAY | October 22, 2004
As a public service, it is our solemn duty to tell you to avoid being seduced by the smirking holiday veneer worn by Surviving Christmas. If you need heartwarming, Christmas-inspired misanthropy, the nearest available DVD of Bad Santa remains your first, best option. And Ben Affleck is a principal reason for this. OK, maybe not Affleck so much as the moviemakers who expect us to spend even five minutes in the company of his character, Drew Latham, an advertising mogul who's such a self-aggrandizing shark he believes he can "sell whale steaks to Greenpeace."
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By RAY FRAGER | February 11, 2005
ESPN'S COLLEGE GameDay lands at College Park tomorrow, broadcast live from the University of Maryland's Comcast Center, site of tomorrow night's game against Duke. In the words of Tommy James (of Shondells fame), children, behave. Expect to hear lots from the raucous Maryland student fans during the 11 a.m. show. In that hour, Terps coach Gary Williams will join the GameDay crew of host Rece Davis and analysts Jay Bilas, Digger Phelps (Rider '63) and ESPN.com's Andy Katz. Also during that first program, ESPN features a look at the Maryland-Duke rivalry and profiles the Blue Devils' J.J. Redick, the dead-eye shooter who draws a level of vitriol usually reserved for political talk radio.
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By Lou Cedrone | November 19, 1990
''Home Alone'' is initially irritating, but once the movie gets under way it atones for the opening portion with continuous laughs.Do you like the Three Stooges? Do you like the Tom and Jerry cartoons? If you do, you'll certainly enjoy the new film, once those initial scenes are spent.John Hughes wrote and produced. He's the man who wrote ''Pretty in Pink'' and ''The Breakfast Club.'' A few years ago, he got away from the ''Brat Pack'' films and began doing things like ''Planes, Trains and Automobiles.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 24, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- CBS has a delicious bit of recycling in store for viewers starting tonight, as well as a new show that even its producer, Rob Reiner, calls "an acquired taste."If you are a fan of Leslie Nielsen and "Naked Gun," don't miss the return of "Police Squad!" at 8 tonight (and subsequent Wednesdays) on WBAL-TV (Channel 11)."Police Squad!" is the 1982 ABC-TV spoof of cop shows that inspired the phenomenally successful "Naked Gun" movies.The TV series was canceled after only six episodes.
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By Scott Eyman and Scott Eyman,COX NEWS SERVICE | September 25, 2003
Every couple of years, Christopher Guest pulls his faithful actors and crew together and makes a faux documentary focusing on the deluded members of some intrinsically American subculture. The reviews are great, the film disappears from theaters in a couple of weeks and reappears for its real audience on DVD. Guest has previously made Best in Show, about obsessive dog-lovers, and Waiting for Guffman, about small-town show biz wannabes, all riffing on Rob Reiner's classic, This is Spinal Tap. A Mighty Wind (to be released Tuesday)
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | February 3, 1995
It's a very strange, and very compelling, life-or-death theme night on Friday's best TV series. On "The X-Files," Scully (Gillian Anderson) has her life threatened by a practitioner of voodoo. On "Homicide: Life on the Street," three officers fight for their lives in surgery and post-op, while the hunt for their assailant continues. And on "Picket Fences," Carter the coroner (Kelly Connell) becomes romantically involved with a nightclub singer -- after pronouncing her dead. (Trust me on this one.)
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | February 11, 2005
ESPN'S COLLEGE GameDay lands at College Park tomorrow, broadcast live from the University of Maryland's Comcast Center, site of tomorrow night's game against Duke. In the words of Tommy James (of Shondells fame), children, behave. Expect to hear lots from the raucous Maryland student fans during the 11 a.m. show. In that hour, Terps coach Gary Williams will join the GameDay crew of host Rece Davis and analysts Jay Bilas, Digger Phelps (Rider '63) and ESPN.com's Andy Katz. Also during that first program, ESPN features a look at the Maryland-Duke rivalry and profiles the Blue Devils' J.J. Redick, the dead-eye shooter who draws a level of vitriol usually reserved for political talk radio.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 22, 2006
Director Christopher Guest and his stock company, who gave us Best in Show and A Mighty Wind, are such deft, humane comedians they put you in a happy daze even when they shred their characters' dreams. Their latest frolic, For Your Consideration, satirizes Hollywood awards frenzy -- and happily transcends its subject. It's about delusion and endurance. For Your Consideration (Warner Independent) Starring Catherine O' Hara, Harry Shearer, Parker Posey, John Michael Higgins, Eugene Levy, Fred Willard, Jane Lynch, Christopher Guest.
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By Gene Seymour and Gene Seymour,NEWSDAY | October 22, 2004
As a public service, it is our solemn duty to tell you to avoid being seduced by the smirking holiday veneer worn by Surviving Christmas. If you need heartwarming, Christmas-inspired misanthropy, the nearest available DVD of Bad Santa remains your first, best option. And Ben Affleck is a principal reason for this. OK, maybe not Affleck so much as the moviemakers who expect us to spend even five minutes in the company of his character, Drew Latham, an advertising mogul who's such a self-aggrandizing shark he believes he can "sell whale steaks to Greenpeace."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Eyman and Scott Eyman,COX NEWS SERVICE | September 25, 2003
Every couple of years, Christopher Guest pulls his faithful actors and crew together and makes a faux documentary focusing on the deluded members of some intrinsically American subculture. The reviews are great, the film disappears from theaters in a couple of weeks and reappears for its real audience on DVD. Guest has previously made Best in Show, about obsessive dog-lovers, and Waiting for Guffman, about small-town show biz wannabes, all riffing on Rob Reiner's classic, This is Spinal Tap. A Mighty Wind (to be released Tuesday)
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | February 3, 1995
It's a very strange, and very compelling, life-or-death theme night on Friday's best TV series. On "The X-Files," Scully (Gillian Anderson) has her life threatened by a practitioner of voodoo. On "Homicide: Life on the Street," three officers fight for their lives in surgery and post-op, while the hunt for their assailant continues. And on "Picket Fences," Carter the coroner (Kelly Connell) becomes romantically involved with a nightclub singer -- after pronouncing her dead. (Trust me on this one.)
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 24, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- CBS has a delicious bit of recycling in store for viewers starting tonight, as well as a new show that even its producer, Rob Reiner, calls "an acquired taste."If you are a fan of Leslie Nielsen and "Naked Gun," don't miss the return of "Police Squad!" at 8 tonight (and subsequent Wednesdays) on WBAL-TV (Channel 11)."Police Squad!" is the 1982 ABC-TV spoof of cop shows that inspired the phenomenally successful "Naked Gun" movies.The TV series was canceled after only six episodes.
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By Lou Cedrone | November 19, 1990
''Home Alone'' is initially irritating, but once the movie gets under way it atones for the opening portion with continuous laughs.Do you like the Three Stooges? Do you like the Tom and Jerry cartoons? If you do, you'll certainly enjoy the new film, once those initial scenes are spent.John Hughes wrote and produced. He's the man who wrote ''Pretty in Pink'' and ''The Breakfast Club.'' A few years ago, he got away from the ''Brat Pack'' films and began doing things like ''Planes, Trains and Automobiles.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2003
Look for reviews of films opening this week in the Today section. A Mighty Wind This film is the latest improvisational comedy from Christopher Guest and his stock company (including Eugene Levy, Michael McKean, Harry Shearer, Catherine O'Hara, Jennifer Coolidge, Jane Lynch, Fred Willard and Parker Posey), about several folk-singing groups assembling in New York's Town Hall to pay tribute to a deceased folkie impresario. PG-13. (Area theaters) Irreversible The new film by French cinema's bad boy, Gaspar Noe, tells the story of a brutal rape and its aftermath -- backward.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 13, 2000
When it comes to comedy, there may be nothing harder than taking a subject that's ripe for satire and doing it justice. Anyone can make fun of something or level a jab or two. But getting that satiric tone just right - making it funny, but not offensive, and sustaining it for 90 minutes - takes a true artist. That's why laughter-starved audiences everywhere should thank God daily for Christopher Guest, whose sly and slightly jaundiced world view has been responsible for some of the finest satires in recent memory.
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