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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 27, 1996
"Walking and Talking" is much more about hurting and crying than it is about walking. But fortunately, it's also about laughing.A clever examination of that painful existence known as the single life at crisis point, it's everything a small movie should be: shrewd, comic, sad and short.It examines one of those painful dilemmas invisible to the world at large but exquisitely endured by those who must face it: that is, what happens to a single woman when her best friend, also a single woman, gets married?
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By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
The long relationship between HBO and David Simon will continue with the Baltimore filmmaker co-writing and producing "Show Me a Hero," a six-hour miniseries, for the premium cable channel. Based on the non-fiction book of the same title by Lisa Belkin, the series that explores race relations in the 1980s and '90s in Yonkers, N.Y.,  will star Oscar Isaac and Catherine Keener. Simon said in an email to The Sun that the miniseries will be filmed in Yonkers, because that's where the real-life events it covers took place.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 21, 2006
There's a self-loathing at the center of Friends with Money that makes it a tad unpalatable, as well as a sameness, a dependence on cliche, that makes it seem trite. All the fine acting, all the carefully observed friendships at its center can't overcome the feeling that something of a dead horse is being beaten here. Jennifer Aniston, who seems to enjoy playing the outsider with self-confidence issues (see 2002's The Good Girl), is the one with the friends - OK, let's get all the puns about her erstwhile TV series out of the way now - and as the title suggests, she doesn't have much money.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | October 9, 2009
'The Baader-Meinhof Complex' ***1/2 ( 3 1/2 STARS) One of the few political movies of the new millennium that comes close to the excitement and revelation of classics like "Z" or "The Battle of Algiers," this unsparing look at the West German terrorists who brewed bloody revolutionary actions out of muddled Marxist theory is an exciting, combative and infuriating experience. It boasts another indelible performance from Martina Gedeck, who makes something both moving and harrowing out of Ulrike Meinhof's transformation from bourgeois left-wing intellectual to terrorist.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | April 24, 2009
The twin heroes of The Soloist have to stare down almost every evil modern society can throw at them: mental illness, urban decay, hubris, abuse of power, narcissism, even the declining fortunes of America's newspapers. And while they don't exactly emerge triumphant, they win enough battles to give us all hope. Robert Downey Jr. is Los Angeles Times columnist Steve Lopez, and he's desperate for a story. Out trolling one afternoon, he hears violin music coming from the area surrounding a statue of Beethoven.
FEATURES
By Henry Sheehan and Henry Sheehan,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 28, 1998
In his first feature film, "In the Company of Men," writer-director Neil LaBute used two young corporate employees' pursuit and sexual humiliation of a secretary to portray relations between the sexes as a cruel male power trip.In his new film, "Your Friends & Neighbors," LaBute still hews to his vision of men as brutes. Only now he has expanded it; the women are emotional pigs, too. The movie follows the infidelities of three friends from college, now affluent professionals, and their current lovers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | August 18, 1995
"Living in Oblivion" actually lives in a different neighborhood: the hip precincts of drop-dead post-modernism. It's a film and a critique of film at once. It's narrative turned wittily in on itself with a maniac's glee. It does one other monstrously nifty thing: It dares make fun of Brad Pitt.Yes. Brad Pitt, self-styled homeboy Tarzan of Cinema of the '90s. Pitt is represented in "Living in Oblivion" by James Le Gros as vain, stupid, promiscuous, self-indulgent, self-promoting and a cry-baby.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | October 9, 2009
'The Baader-Meinhof Complex' ***1/2 ( 3 1/2 STARS) One of the few political movies of the new millennium that comes close to the excitement and revelation of classics like "Z" or "The Battle of Algiers," this unsparing look at the West German terrorists who brewed bloody revolutionary actions out of muddled Marxist theory is an exciting, combative and infuriating experience. It boasts another indelible performance from Martina Gedeck, who makes something both moving and harrowing out of Ulrike Meinhof's transformation from bourgeois left-wing intellectual to terrorist.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 22, 2005
Like a soldier squirreled away in a bunker months after the end of a war, the tortured hero of Rebecca Miller's The Ballad of Jack and Rose remains on an island commune in 1986, a decade after the waning of the counterculture. A Scottish engineer, Jack knows America isn't the country he hoped it would become when he bought his land, applied for citizenship and established his radical enclave. But staying self-sufficient, keeping his distance from commercial pressures and commercial culture make him feel as if he can save his soul - and protect his teenage daughter, Rose, from the ugliness of the outside world.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 23, 2002
SUN SCORE * Simone sets itself an impossible goal. Then doesn't achieve it. That might seem like a tough thing to blame a movie for, but writer/director Andrew Niccol set the bar high, not me. Here's the movie's set-up: Once-flourishing film director Viktor Taransky (Al Pacino) has hit rock-bottom. His last few movies have tanked, his egomaniacal star (played with discomfiting relish by Winona Ryder) has walked off his latest picture, no other actress is willing to work with him, and the studio (in the person of his ex-wife, played by Catherine Keener)
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | April 24, 2009
The twin heroes of The Soloist have to stare down almost every evil modern society can throw at them: mental illness, urban decay, hubris, abuse of power, narcissism, even the declining fortunes of America's newspapers. And while they don't exactly emerge triumphant, they win enough battles to give us all hope. Robert Downey Jr. is Los Angeles Times columnist Steve Lopez, and he's desperate for a story. Out trolling one afternoon, he hears violin music coming from the area surrounding a statue of Beethoven.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 21, 2006
There's a self-loathing at the center of Friends with Money that makes it a tad unpalatable, as well as a sameness, a dependence on cliche, that makes it seem trite. All the fine acting, all the carefully observed friendships at its center can't overcome the feeling that something of a dead horse is being beaten here. Jennifer Aniston, who seems to enjoy playing the outsider with self-confidence issues (see 2002's The Good Girl), is the one with the friends - OK, let's get all the puns about her erstwhile TV series out of the way now - and as the title suggests, she doesn't have much money.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 22, 2005
Like a soldier squirreled away in a bunker months after the end of a war, the tortured hero of Rebecca Miller's The Ballad of Jack and Rose remains on an island commune in 1986, a decade after the waning of the counterculture. A Scottish engineer, Jack knows America isn't the country he hoped it would become when he bought his land, applied for citizenship and established his radical enclave. But staying self-sufficient, keeping his distance from commercial pressures and commercial culture make him feel as if he can save his soul - and protect his teenage daughter, Rose, from the ugliness of the outside world.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 15, 2005
Many pictures that win the Oscar don't have the resonance of a doorbell. Once their title is called at the podium, they set off no echoes in the culture. The Best Years of Our Lives, William Wyler's tough-minded, poignant chronicle of three World War II veterans coming home, mattered mightily as social commentary in 1946 - and matters just as much as history right now. Lance Morrow's new book, subtitled Kennedy, Johnson and Nixon in 1948: Learning the Secrets of Power, takes place two years later, but he gives it the main title, The Best Years of Their Lives, and he uses Wyler's film to capture a complex postwar mood, not of triumph but "of anger, of self-pity."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 23, 2002
SUN SCORE * Simone sets itself an impossible goal. Then doesn't achieve it. That might seem like a tough thing to blame a movie for, but writer/director Andrew Niccol set the bar high, not me. Here's the movie's set-up: Once-flourishing film director Viktor Taransky (Al Pacino) has hit rock-bottom. His last few movies have tanked, his egomaniacal star (played with discomfiting relish by Winona Ryder) has walked off his latest picture, no other actress is willing to work with him, and the studio (in the person of his ex-wife, played by Catherine Keener)
FEATURES
By Henry Sheehan and Henry Sheehan,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 28, 1998
In his first feature film, "In the Company of Men," writer-director Neil LaBute used two young corporate employees' pursuit and sexual humiliation of a secretary to portray relations between the sexes as a cruel male power trip.In his new film, "Your Friends & Neighbors," LaBute still hews to his vision of men as brutes. Only now he has expanded it; the women are emotional pigs, too. The movie follows the infidelities of three friends from college, now affluent professionals, and their current lovers.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 15, 2005
Many pictures that win the Oscar don't have the resonance of a doorbell. Once their title is called at the podium, they set off no echoes in the culture. The Best Years of Our Lives, William Wyler's tough-minded, poignant chronicle of three World War II veterans coming home, mattered mightily as social commentary in 1946 - and matters just as much as history right now. Lance Morrow's new book, subtitled Kennedy, Johnson and Nixon in 1948: Learning the Secrets of Power, takes place two years later, but he gives it the main title, The Best Years of Their Lives, and he uses Wyler's film to capture a complex postwar mood, not of triumph but "of anger, of self-pity."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 27, 1996
"Walking and Talking" is much more about hurting and crying than it is about walking. But fortunately, it's also about laughing.A clever examination of that painful existence known as the single life at crisis point, it's everything a small movie should be: shrewd, comic, sad and short.It examines one of those painful dilemmas invisible to the world at large but exquisitely endured by those who must face it: that is, what happens to a single woman when her best friend, also a single woman, gets married?
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