Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCathedral School
IN THE NEWS

Cathedral School

NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | April 18, 2009
Catherine L. "Kay" O'Neill, a retired parochial school educator and a former Northwood resident, died April 10 of cancer at the Brightwood Center in Lutherville. She was 84. Catherine Loftus, the daughter of Irish immigrants, was born in Philadelphia, the second of seven children. She was a 1942 graduate of Little Flower High School in Philadelphia and attended St. Joseph's College. During World War II while working as a clerk at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, she met her future husband, William Francis O'Neill, Jr., a career naval officer, whom she married in 1945.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2004
Bertha Streeter, a retired art teacher who had been active in Girl Scouts for most of her life, died of heart failure Friday at Azalea Manor, an assisted-living home in Orlando, Fla. She was 87 and formerly lived in Bolton Hill. Born Bertha Moulton Kidd in Baltimore and raised in Walbrook, she joined the Girl Scouts in 1929 and retained her membership for 75 years. She led Girl Scout troops in Walbrook and Roland Park from the 1940s through the 1960s. On a 1934 visit to Washington with Scouts, she met and was photographed with first lady Eleanor Roosevelt at the White House.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2002
Robert Stuart Burch, an executive recruiter who worked with senior officials in the technology industry, collapsed and suffered an apparent heart attack Thursday at his downtown Washington office. He died several hours later at George Washington Medical Center. He was 43 and lived in Highland in Howard County. Mr. Burch was a managing director of Russell Reynolds Associates in Washington, the global recruiting firm, where he led its North American technology practice. He was formerly an IBM manager in downtown Baltimore.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 9, 1997
NINE OUTSTANDING former student-athletes are the first people to be inducted into Archbishop Spalding High School's new Athletic Hall of Fame.Among them are Suzanne Molz, the Outstanding Senior Athlete in 1974; Lt. James (Jamie) Love, the Outstanding Male Senior Athlete of 1977; Peggy Schultz, winner of the the Charles Markland Kelly Jr. award in 1980; Jim Gyory, an all-county and all-conference lacrosse player from the class of 1982, and Karen Pipkin Franke, 1982 winner of the Charles Markland Kelly Jr. award.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2003
Ben Myers, 14, is giving a Christmas present this year that speaks volumes about him. Nine hundred volumes, to be exact. That's the number of children's books that Ben, a pupil at the School of the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen, rounded up to donate to a family health clinic and day care center in East Baltimore that was hit hard by Tropical Storm Isabel. It started in September, after Isabel struck the Lillian D. Wald Community Nursing Center at 1600 Rutland Ave. with such force that the basement was flooded with 4 feet of water, ruining the collection of children's books downstairs.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | January 22, 2009
Sister Mary Kateri Sullivan, a member of the Religious Sisters of Mercy whose career as a parochial school educator spanned nearly 50 years, died in her sleep Friday at The Villa, her order's retirement home in the Woodbrook section of Baltimore County. She was 94. Catherine Agnes Sullivan was born and raised in Southwest Baltimore. As a child, she attended St. Peter the Apostle parochial school. After graduating from Seton High School in 1933, she entered the Religious Sisters of Mercy.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | January 10, 2008
Sister Mary Evangeline Waters, a retired educator and member of the Sisters of Mercy for more than seven decades, died of heart failure Friday at The Villa, her order's retirement home in the Woodbrook section of Baltimore County. She was 97. She was born Ellen Ford Waters in Leonardtown and raised in Baltimore. She attended Margaret Brent Elementary School and was a 1928 graduate of Western High School. One day, she and several friends went to visit the Sisters of Mercy motherhouse on the grounds of St. Agnes College in Mount Washington.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | March 20, 2007
Marie Trinite Whittie, an artist who affectionately depicted Baltimore in her paintings of its rowhouses and street scenes, died Saturday of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at Mercy Medical Center. The Bolton Hill resident was a day short of her 87th birthday. Born Marie Elizabeth Trinite in Pikesville, she grew up on Madison Street and attended the Cathedral School before graduating from Eastern High School in 1938. She earned a fine arts degree at the Maryland Institute College of Art. Mrs. Whittie worked while smoking a cigarette, and - during baseball season - listening to broadcasts of Orioles games that she played loudly on two radios, neighbors said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | February 22, 2008
Margaret M. Feeley, a homemaker, former businesswoman and longtime Eucharistic minister, died Tuesday of progressive supranuclear palsy, a rare brain disease, at Oak Crest Village retirement community in Parkville. She was 87. Margaret Evans was born in Baltimore and raised on Guilford Avenue. After graduating from Mount St. Agnes High School in 1938, she attended what is now Towson University. During World War II, she was a telephone operator for Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. In 1944, she married Jerome L. Feeley Jr., her teenage sweetheart, who was then a Navy bomber pilot.
EXPLORE
By Kathy Hudsonhudmud@aol.com | January 30, 2012
In winter, houses and structures are more obvious than in other seasons when abundant foliage obscures their view. On a recent walk in Roland Park, we passed one longstanding institution after another.  I thought of what staying power these neighborhood institutions have had, and what anchors they have been to the community. Architects and planners have long studied the design of Roland Park. The integration of educational and religious institutions, along with an off-street business block at the center, has given this community vibrant life since its earliest days.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.