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NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | March 18, 2009
This simple fish dish comes from a new Weight Watchers cookbook that offers lean dinners in 20 minutes or less, and this recipe delivered. It also had the qualities that please my picky crowd at home: a pretty plain piece of fish, in this case, that one could dress up with a sauce or not. The catfish, on sale, also fit our budget. I was intrigued by the name, of course. The seasoning had a few of the elements of Old Bay Seasoning, including a dash of cayenne, which you can leave out if your kids are sensitive to spices.
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SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | December 28, 2008
Where would we be without wacky, the fuel that runs the news business? Never a "d'oh" moment? Perish the thought. Isn't that right, Plaxico Burress, Rod Blagojevich and Roger Clemens? As we steel ourselves for the plunge into 2009, when we'll celebrate the 200th anniversary of the birth of Charles "Survival of the Fittest" Darwin, here is a look back at some of the wacky outdoors acts of 2008, ripped from the pages of notebooks, cocktail napkins and newspapers around the country. * The year began with a story from Chaparral, N.M.: Two men trying to trace the outline of a loaded .357-caliber Magnum on their bodies as a pattern for a tattoo accidentally shot themselves, the Otero County Sheriff's Department reported.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN REPORTER | September 26, 2007
Samari Rolle, Demetrius Williams and Cory Ross are familiar names among Ravens fans. But to those close to them, those three players are better known as "Doorknob," "Scrill" and "Pork Chop." Rolle said he has been called "Doorknob" since his days at Miami Beach High in Florida because the top of his head looks like a doorknob. "Every level I've been to, it's just stuck," Rolle said. "Now people just call me `Knob' for short. Even my wife will call me `Knob.'" While Williams is better known as "Spider-Man" for his acrobatic catches and intricate tattoo of the comic book superhero on his right biceps, his University of Oregon teammates called him "Scrill," which is defined by Urbandictionary.
NEWS
By Lynna Williams and Lynna Williams,Chicago Tribune | March 25, 2007
A Miracle of Catfish Larry Brown Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill / 455 pages / $24.95 For 16 years, Larry Brown's highly praised novels, short stories and nonfiction illuminated the brutally hard, funny and sometimes magical realities of his native Mississippi. In his sixth novel, A Miracle of Catfish, the book nearing completion when Brown died in 2004, he gives us old men and fathers as fiercely competent as they are murderous, and a factory maintenance man who can't do one blessed thing right, especially when it comes to fathering his wonderful little boy. There are considerably fewer Mississippi wives and daughters in the novel than there are male points of view about the women's attributes and responsibilities (a light touch when cooking biscuits matters, in other words)
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | February 28, 2007
Into the Vietnamese Kitchen By Andrea Nguyen Curry Cuisine Fragrant Dishes From India, Thailand, Vietnam and Indonesia By Corinne Trang DK Publishing / 2006 / $25 I gew up in a household of Indian immigrants, so I'm a born and bred curry aficionado. So the red chili peppers and the bold pink "Curry Cuisine" lettering on this cookbook were an immediate draw. The book includes 180 recipes from more than a dozen regions of the world, including India, Thailand, Myanmar and Laos. If you're not a fan of the traditional soupy, fiery curries of South Asia, don't worry.
NEWS
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO and STEPHANIE SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | June 14, 2006
As "Catfish Capes," Frank Caples Jr. travels 50,000 miles every summer preparing fried catfish platters at festivals around the country. This year, the Minnesota entrepreneur plans to bring his 18-foot mobile kitchen to 40 events, including Baltimore's African American Heritage Festival, which takes place this weekend at Camden Yards. If you go The African American Heritage Festival takes place from 4 p.m.-10 p.m. Friday, noon-10 p.m. Saturday and noon-9 p.m. Sunday at Oriole Park at Camden Yards.
NEWS
By DAWN TURNER TRICE and DAWN TURNER TRICE,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 11, 2006
INDIANOLA, Miss. -- In 1983, when Sarah Claree White joined the kill line at the Delta Pride Catfish processing plant, the workers' lives were so dominated by stopwatches that even their restroom visits were timed. White male supervisors often followed the workers - nearly all of them black women - into the bathrooms with timers to make sure they didn't stay too long. White was one of the catfish workers who began the fight for change in the growing industry, demanding medical benefits, job security and a work environment free of sexual harassment.
NEWS
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO and STEPHANIE SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | March 1, 2006
Because "Crash" takes place in Los Angeles, where cultures are ever colliding and fusing, it conjures a panoply of possibilities. In sweeping cinematic fashion, four of this year's five Oscar hopefuls for best motion picture tackle McCarthyism, homosexuality, multiculturalism, literary genius and ruthless ambition -- all perennial American themes. In sweeping culinary fashion, the same Academy Award nominees also summon visions of an Oscar-night party that would add substance -- and sustenance -- to the four films' various settings.
NEWS
January 27, 2006
Boy made threats, prosecutors say An 8-year-old boy charged with shooting a 7-year-old day care classmate in the arm had previously made threats involving guns, including shooting police and killing another person, prosecutors said yesterday. The boy also was influenced by a violent video game given to him by his father, who prosecutors allege introduced the boy to guns. The father, John L. Hall Sr., is accused of showing his son how to use the .38-caliber handgun used in the shooting the night before the incident.
NEWS
By Donna Pierce and Donna Pierce,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 6, 2005
Canned tomatoes and frozen sliced okra offer shortcuts to success by adding a colorful flavor boost to this comfort soup. Using a between-season lineup of vegetables available now in the produce section, this hearty dinner satisfies while we await spring vegetables. Substitute tilapia or red snapper fillets if you don't have a taste for catfish, and call it seafood soup. Tip Buy shredded cabbage from the supermarket to save chopping time. Catfish Soup Preparation time: 15 minutes; cooking time: 25 minutes Makes 8 servings 4 slices bacon, cut into 1-inch pieces 2 each, quartered: small red onion, ribs celery 1 carrot, quartered 2 cloves garlic 1/2 teaspoon salt freshly ground pepper 1/2 teaspoon hot pepper flakes 2 cans (14 1/2 ounces each)
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