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By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2012
On New Year's Eve, Shawn Wetzel went from his home near Gettysburg, Pa., down to his favorite fishing spot on the Potomac River at Fort Washington Marina. Wetzel, who goes there every weekend, has caught around seven catfish weighing more than 60pounds each over the past two years. Then on New Year's Eve he reeled in one that he weighed in at a little more than 79 pounds. It would have broken the Maryland record for blue catfish, except for one small problem. "Being a holiday, there was nobody [from the Department of Natural Resources]
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2012
Halfway through our dinner at Phaze 10, a long, low and very loud note emanated from a horn someplace in the bar section of the building. It would've given us a start, but thanks to the restaurant's intensely flavorful Southern food, we were wide awake already. The restaurant and jazz lounge opened last June on a stretch of Howard Street that feels somewhat desolate after dark. Inside Phaze 10's doors, however, the space is cozy and inviting, with a long, warmly lit bar and interesting architectural details like exposed brick arches.
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SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2010
Two years ago, officials bubbled with piscatorial pride when Frederick County angler Ron Lewis set a state record with a 67.1-pound blue catfish caught on the Potomac River. "Mr. Lewis's historic catch illustrates Maryland's superb year-round fishing opportunities," said Department of Natural Resources Secretary John Griffin in a news release. With great fanfare, the enormous fish was relocated to a new home in the big tank at Bass Pro Shops at Arundel Mills, where it is still the biggest thing swimming around.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2012
On New Year's Eve, Shawn Wetzel went from his home near Gettysburg, Pa., down to his favorite fishing spot on the Potomac River at Fort Washington Marina. Wetzel, who goes there every weekend, has caught around seven catfish weighing more than 60pounds each over the past two years. Then on New Year's Eve he reeled in one that he weighed in at a little more than 79 pounds. It would have broken the Maryland record for blue catfish, except for one small problem. "Being a holiday, there was nobody [from the Department of Natural Resources]
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Writer | May 28, 1995
The second-most popular fish taken from fresh water across the United States is the catfish, an ugly scavenger that can hit baits like a freight train and outfight America's most popular catch, the black bass.As the summer warms, fishing for cats in fresh and tidal rivers picks up in Maryland as catfish become more active and concentrate in areas with heavy bottom structure.Fishing for cats doesn't require the gear or finesse that fishing for black bass does, but attention to a few basic details can make catching them easier.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | April 23, 1993
The back of the '59 Chevy truck has become a little house, with painted screen walls and metal roof. Inside, sitting onblocks of ice on a sawdust-covered floor, a sculpture of a big, old catfish stares out the back. He has sections of rubber tubing from a car's engine for whiskers and a piece of a tire for a fin. Alison Saar, who thought him up, stands at the back of the truck and sings her version of an Arabber's call:Clear, clear, clear blue water,Bright, bright, bright blue sky,Catfish, catfish dreamin',Catfish dreamin',Won't you come and buy?
NEWS
By Donna Pierce and Donna Pierce,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 8, 2004
"I just think of big ugly fish with whiskers," one colleague responded when this menu was announced. But she gave it a thumbs up for delicate flavor after a sample. If an advertising campaign can succeed in upgrading the lowly prune into dried plums, I say it's time to gather a marketing team to come up with a catchy new name for catfish. In the meantime, if you plan to feed doubters, you could refer to this refreshing dish as fish fillets with tomatoes and pecans. Tips: Pecan toasting isn't mandatory.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | May 17, 1991
A mysterious illness is attacking the carp and catfish in the tributaries of the upper Chesapeake Bay, killing some and leaving others sick with kidney damage and bulging eyes.But so far, biologists with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources haven't figured out whether the cause of the sickness is some natural disease or toxic contamination.Officials have been getting reports of problems for several years, but this winter and spring biologists began a more in-depth look for the cause and have collected samples of fish tissue as well as water and mud from the bottom of rivers.
FEATURES
By Universal Press Syndicate | January 13, 1991
PITTSBORO, Ind. -- About three-quarters of a century ago, there was a car dealership on State Road 136 in Pittsboro. It sold Overlands. Overland cars bit the dust, and the building became a hardware store, then a gas station, then a hatchery. It is now Frank and Mary's restaurant, one of the nicest places in the Midwest to eat catfish.The historical atmosphere adds special flavor to the dining experience, because the meals served at Frank and Mary's long tables in the big old dining room are themselves a taste of tradition: Midwestern Americana, from fried chicken or catfish or ribeye steaks to peppermint ice cream (a Hoosier favorite)
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi | July 31, 1991
IF YOU ARE ONE OF THOSE PEOPLE who gets hysterical when someone is invited to dinner, relax and listen to Lee Bailey.Sure, you say, it's easy for him. He's an interior designer and a wonderful cook, who has produced a slew of cookbooks that are beautiful enough to push Martha Stewart's tomes right off the coffee table.But this oh-so-charming Southern gentlemen who retains his Louisiana charm despite his sophisticated years in the Big Apple asks you to look more closely at those beautiful photographs in his nine books on food and entertaining.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2012
Valentine's Day is history, moving on to Mardi Gras. For some folks, Mardi Gras means a one-day celebration on Fat Tuesday itself; for others, that day is just the end of a revelry period that began on thethe Epiphany. And some folks call it Carnival. Paladar Latin Kitchen & Rum Bar in Annapolis, for instance, has been wading waist-deep since Jan. 30 in a celebration they're calling Carnaval. The restaurant has been featuring menu specials inspired by street food from South American, Central America and the Caribbean   - chorizo and black bean fritters, Cuban chicken croquettes, Brazilians-style chile-spiked fudge and jibarito short rib sliders, which use flattened fried green plantains stand in for bread.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2012
Sunday at 8 p.m. on "Hillbilly Handfishin," Bluegrass Tavern operating partner Jorbie Clark and his Aussie pal Aaron Stubbs go noodling with hosts Skipper Bivins and Trent Jackson and try to catch massive catfish with their hands and feet. That's this Sunday at 8 p.m. You can watch the "Hillbilly Handfishin'" episode with Clark at Bluegrass , where, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m., the South Baltimore restaurant will be featuring $2 domestics, $3 imports and Lynchburg lemonade, $4 drafts and selected wines - and complimentary catfish bites.
EXPLORE
By Jim Kennedy | November 10, 2011
If you spent any time around the Susquehanna River below the Conowingo Dam over the summer, you probably noticed some of the same wanted posters that caught my eye. On those posters is the likeness of a fish, with a warning to anyone who catches one not to release it back into the river. If this fish story sounds a little familiar, maybe it's because recollections of the infamous frankenfish remain fresh in the public imagination, even as the hype has died down and the finned terror known in these parts as the northern snakehead has staked out a territory and established itself as a permanent resident.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2011
The ideal summer vacation for Jen Grottenthaler typically involves a beach and "drinks with little umbrellas in them. " Certainly more adventurous than her former college roommate, Sherry Insley has loved being around the water since the days she used to go sportfishing with her family off Ocean City . Neither had ever heard of handfishing, or as the locals call it, noodling. So how did two thirtysomethings with young children living in Baltimore wind up spending nearly a week this summer in an Oklahoma town so small it's not even on the map?
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2011
You might not think a reality TV series titled "Hillbilly Handfishin'" would have much to do with Baltimore and East Coast urban living. But that's not the case. The series that premieres Sunday  at 10 p.m. on Animal Planet will feature at least three couples from the area during its 12-episode run, according to John Jones, post-production supervising producer on the series and resident of Federal Hill. Here's how Animal Planet describes the series (and you can see a video below)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2010
Alchemy , a stylish new bistro in Hampden, had me at its appetizers. The fish plate ($11) had just the right amount of applewood smoke, which gave the fillet of trout and the salmon a hint of wood flavor without being overpowering. Smoked fish is not an easy dish to pull off — often it ends up either too fishy or smoky — and this "app" had the right balance. The chicken liver pate ($9) was also a winner. I am not a liver lover, but this mix of chicken livers, butter flavored with fresh herbs, caramelized onions, Armagnac and peppercorn was a head-turner and a palate-pleaser.
NEWS
By DAWN TURNER TRICE and DAWN TURNER TRICE,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 11, 2006
INDIANOLA, Miss. -- In 1983, when Sarah Claree White joined the kill line at the Delta Pride Catfish processing plant, the workers' lives were so dominated by stopwatches that even their restroom visits were timed. White male supervisors often followed the workers - nearly all of them black women - into the bathrooms with timers to make sure they didn't stay too long. White was one of the catfish workers who began the fight for change in the growing industry, demanding medical benefits, job security and a work environment free of sexual harassment.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | May 3, 1993
The worms were squishy, the chicken livers were gross and the catfish were biting yesterday at the fifth annual Fishing Rodeo at the Westminster Community Pond.Seven-year-old Corey DeShong of Westminster was named grand champion for skillfully using a chicken liver to snag a 20 1/2 -inch catfish, the best catch of the day. He earned a bright blue trophy with a large, gold-colored bass flipping its fins on top and gift certificates to three pizza restaurants.His winning entry actually was recorded at 21 1/2 inches because organizers gave fishermen an extra inch if they threw their catches back.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2010
Two years ago, officials bubbled with piscatorial pride when Frederick County angler Ron Lewis set a state record with a 67.1-pound blue catfish caught on the Potomac River. "Mr. Lewis's historic catch illustrates Maryland's superb year-round fishing opportunities," said Department of Natural Resources Secretary John Griffin in a news release. With great fanfare, the enormous fish was relocated to a new home in the big tank at Bass Pro Shops at Arundel Mills, where it is still the biggest thing swimming around.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 26, 2010
The poor folk of Catfish Row are back onstage at the Kennedy Center, with all their warmth and kindness, passion and pettiness, superstition and faith, and they're as involving as ever in the brilliant Washington National Opera production of George Gershwin's "Porgy and Bess." This revival of the company's 2005 staging reconfirms the incisive elements of Francesca Zambello's directorial concept, which largely overcomes the work's 1930s stereotypes of African-Americans. She knows how to craft a true ensemble effort, so that a real sense of community is ever-present.
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