Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCaterpillar
IN THE NEWS

Caterpillar

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | July 3, 1994
PEORIA, Ill. -- Ten times in 2 1/2 years the United Auto Workers struck Caterpillar Inc., but with no visible effect on the company.Now as the union enters the third week of yet another walkout, many believe the outcome of the 11th will be different.The company and the strikers are in the midst of a battle that could redefine all American workers' speech and strike rights.Although the two sides are deeply divided, they do agree on one point: Whatever the outcome, this latest strike by 14,000 UAW members could set a new tone for labor-management relations nationwide.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
A caterpillar species never before seen in the Baltimore area and considered a potential threat to local agriculture production was intercepted at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport, U.S. Customs and Border Patrol said Friday. The discovery of the Chrysauginae caterpillar was confirmed July 24 after a review of the caterpillar by an entomologist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The caterpillar was first discovered in soursop leaves being carried by a passenger who had arrived at BWI on a flight from Jamaica on Nov. 14, customs officials said.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,Special to the Sun | September 24, 2005
Last week I felt stinging on my arm while I was pruning and realized I brushed against a caterpillar. It reminded me of a weird Scottie dog, brown with fuzzy "ears" at both ends, green in the middle with one neat brown spot. The sting hurt like the dickens, until I put the old baking soda-water home remedy on it. What was that caterpillar? The saddleback caterpillar is the larval form of a common East Coast moth. Eggs are laid in clutches, and initially caterpillars can be gregarious, feeding in groups.
NEWS
April 25, 2014
Last Saturday, almost 100 people gathered in Symphony Woods to learn more about the two proposals for development there. The Coalition to Save Symphony Woods did a great job of helping us to understand them, their history, and their impact on the Woods and Columbia. Most striking to us was the negative impact that three features of the Inner Arbor corporation's proposal will have if it is allowed to proceed. The misnamed "Picnic Table" (only 18 inches off the ground) will cut across the Woods, making access through them difficult.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
A caterpillar species never before seen in the Baltimore area and considered a potential threat to local agriculture production was intercepted at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport, U.S. Customs and Border Patrol said Friday. The discovery of the Chrysauginae caterpillar was confirmed July 24 after a review of the caterpillar by an entomologist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The caterpillar was first discovered in soursop leaves being carried by a passenger who had arrived at BWI on a flight from Jamaica on Nov. 14, customs officials said.
NEWS
By KIM CLARK and KIM CLARK,Kim Clark is a business reporter for The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 1992
The United Auto Workers' decision to send strikers back to their jobs at Caterpillar Inc. last week was the labor equivalent of a Dunkirk operation -- a retreat that saved the union to fight another day.Like Dunkirk, the move was a humiliating education for the retreaters. And like Dunkirk, it will have vast repercussions on people not directly involved in the dispute.Just ask someone like Rodney Dize. Mr. Dize, who drove car-hauling trucks out of Baltimore before he was elected to a local Teamsters office, said he has now realized that strikes, while occasionally necessary, "don't have a chance."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | December 28, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Caterpillar Inc. must pay former strikers who missed out on food and other rewards that the company gave to workers who remained on the job or who crossed picket lines during the 17-month strike, the National Labor Relations Board said yesterday. The company discriminated against picketing workers during strikes between June 1994 and December 1995 by providing free meals, ice cream, beverages, flu shots and T-shirts to nonstrikers and temporary help, the NLRB said.Such action contradicts the National Labor Relations Act because the company rewarded workers with benefits outside union contracts, the board said.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | February 4, 1995
PEORIA, Ill. -- Talks between Caterpillar Inc. and the United Automobile Workers broke down yesterday after four days, failing to settle a seven-month strike.The government's top mediator, John Calhoun Wells, called off negotiations in Louisville, Ky., after the company rejected the union's economic proposal, --ing hopes of a settlement to the manufacturer's longest-running labor dispute.Peoria, Ill.-based Caterpillar said the company was "misled" into believing that the union would present a proposal that would allow it to better compete with overseas rivals.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | December 12, 1991
Caterpillar Inc. announced yesterday that it would probably close its parts-making plant in York, Pa., putting more than 1,900 area jobs at risk.But if the United Automobile Workers, which represents about 1,450 of the York workers, agrees to reduce the Pennsylvania plant's labor costs, company officials said they "might look very favorably at keeping the facility open." Company officials said there was no deadline for negotiations and refused to say exactly what they wanted from the workers to keep the plant open.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | November 4, 2005
A tiny insect has played a big role in delaying the recovery of the ecosystem around Mount St. Helens since the volcano's eruption shook Washington and Oregon in 1980. When the volcano erupted, it heated everything around to 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit and left a gray, moonlike landscape - devoid of wildlife - for 40 square miles. The first plants returned within a year. But a University of Maryland ecologist has found that a caterpillar is slowing nature's recovery by eating up the lupine bush, a low-growing, short-lived perennial plant that is usually among the first to re-colonize denuded landscapes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2011
Saturday is the day Fifi looks forward to every year. Fifi is the American Visionary Art Museum 's giant pink poodle-with-wheels, who once a year ventures outside to take part in what is clearly Baltimore's funkiest annual event, the Kinetic Sculpture Race . This year, some 36 land- and seaworthy vehicles, all strictly people-powered, will be taking part in the 15-mile race over land, sea, mud and sand. Like Fifi, some are designed to resemble animals; one of last year's crowd favorites was a hookah-smoking caterpillar.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | October 11, 2009
Howard County Executive Ken Ulman sat in a rocking chair in Maureen Holmquist's first-grade class at Thunder Hill Elementary while a room of close to 20 wide-eyed children hung on his every word. Ulman asked several students to join him in the front of the room to read parts of Eric Carle's children's classic "The Very Hungry Caterpillar." Ulman's appearance at the school was part of Jumpstart's Read for the Record, an international effort organized to break the world record for the number of adults and children reading the same book on the same day. Last year, nearly 700,000 readers around the world broke the record when they read the classic children's tale "Corduroy."
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | October 9, 2009
On Thursday afternoon, the sun-speckled benches outside Rachael Myers' first-grade classroom at Lutherville Laboratory were occupied by pairs of students, their heads bent over books, some reading aloud. Each one was reading the exact same story: "The Very Hungry Caterpillar" by Eric Carle. A similar scene was unfolding throughout the school as the students were trying to help set a world record for the largest shared reading experience, with the most people reading a particular book on the same day. A number of schools throughout Baltimore County and the region were united in that shared goal, joining in a campaign called Read for the Record.
BUSINESS
December 23, 2008
Circuit City gets OK on $1.1 billion financing RICHMOND, Va.: Circuit City Stores Inc. received final approval yesterday for $1.1 billion in financing to keep operating while the nation's second-biggest electronics retailer is in Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Kevin Huennekens approved the debtor-in-possession loans at a hearing in Richmond. The financing, which replaces a $1.3 billion asset-backed loan that the company had been using, will be used to stock merchandise and pay employees.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2008
Caterpillar Inc. Shares in the maker of farm and construction equipment rose $6.69, or 8.5 percent, to close at $85.28 yesterday and are now within $2 of their all-time high despite the U.S. economic slowdown.
FEATURES
By ELLEN NIBALI AND DAVID CLEMENT | January 19, 2008
Caterpillars are covering my backyard in January. They are about 1 1/2 inches long and 3/8 inch in diameter with a brown back, yellowish belly and yellow side stripe with black dashes. Next door are two vacant fields that get mown twice a year. The caterpillars were active in late fall and during some warm weather in December, too. What are they? Your caterpillars are probably cutworms, larvae of the large, yellow underwing moth, Noctua pronuba. The adjoining grassy fields are their habitat.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,1991 Tribune Media Services, Inc | April 10, 1991
Q. I am 26 years old and have owned Caterpillar Inc. stock for three years. I held on even though the stock kept diving. Now I don't know what to do.A. The earth won't move for this stock any time soon.Nonetheless, you should probably hold your downtrodden shares of Caterpillar Inc. (around $48 a share, New York Stock Exchange), the famous maker of earth-moving machinery, until there's some stabilization in its price, advised Karen Ubelhart, analyst with Shearson Lehman Brothers.Considering how low your shares have fallen, this is no time to sell and recognize a big loss, she believes.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | April 12, 1992
When Bill Pillgreen came back from the Vietnam War, he felt lucky to get a well-paying, secure job as a machinist at the Caterpillar Inc. parts plant in York, Pa. Today, 25 years later, he's afraid his children won't have a chance at that kind of good job.The York plant is the only Caterpillar factory not on strike, but Mr. Pillgreen said many of his fellow workers in York feel they ought to be out supporting the 12,600 United Auto Workers members who...
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.