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NEWS
December 26, 2001
NEW STATE warnings about eating fish caught in Maryland's lakes and rivers may not affect most consumers. But these health advisories emphasize the harmful legacy of many decades of chemical pollution that still lie in water bottoms and in the eroding soils. Levels of toxic chemicals found in recent state fish surveys have not necessarily increased. What has increased is the federal government's estimate of how much fish the average person eats in a month, now 18 ounces instead of 7 ounces.
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SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | May 29, 2009
Fifty-one striped bass are sporting the latest in outdoor apparel as they swim the waters of the Chesapeake Bay: thin, green plastic tags announcing that they are the money fish in the state's annual fishing contest, which begins at 5 a.m. today. One of the fish, nicknamed Diamond Jim, is worth $10,000. The 50 others are worth $500 each. "The Maryland Fishing Challenge" is in its fifth year, with Diamond Jim just one component of the event. Anglers also are encouraged to enter their catches of citation-size fish in more than 60 species - freshwater, tidal and saltwater - for a chance to win a boat, motor and trailer, a guided fishing trip or prizes worth $7,000.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | May 16, 1997
State officials said yesterday that a fish-killing microorganism has been tentatively identified in a river on the Eastern Shore, where watermen have been complaining for months that they're catching fish with sores.But Dorothy L. Leonard, fisheries director, said there isn't enough evidence to say whether the ulcers found on fish in the Pocomoke River were caused by the toxic microorganism, Pfiesteria piscicida, or by something else."We're looking at all the possible causes of these lesions," she said.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2003
A Johns Hopkins study shows that anglers who fish Baltimore's urban tributaries risk getting sick because so many fish are infected with parasites that can cause stomach ailments and, in rare cases, fatalities. Worse yet, those most likely to eat their catch regularly are the ones least aware of the dangers, according to Ellen K. Silbergeld, an epidemiologist and a toxicologist at the university's Bloomberg School of Public Health. Silbergeld surveyed the habits of 1,000 licensed fishermen by mail and interviewed 70 urban anglers at popular fishing spots in and around the city.
NEWS
By Frank Winner | October 12, 1994
I WAS FIRST introduced to fly-fishing in the summer of 1987. It was my second year out of college and I was still rather aimlessly engaged in "finding myself." My college roommate and I, by sheer coincidence, had each moved to the Baltimore area the previous year and, after we had spent the fall and winter celebrating our reunion in the customary fashion, that is by drinking too much, leering hopelessly at women and going home alone, Dave began to pester me about going fishing with him.In two years of walking over each other's dirty laundry we had never discussed the topic of fly-fishing.
NEWS
By Capt. Bob Spore | November 8, 1991
This is it, the last weekend for the 1991 fall recreational striped bass fishing season.Today, tomorrow and Sunday are the final daysof the season. The fishing time is from 5 a.m. to 6 p.m. The creel limit is one fish per person per day.The charter boat season ended Oct. 27. Charter boats and their crew may fish for striped bass like any other recreational fishermen, but they are not supposed to run striped bass charters.There has been little in print on where, when and how to catch these fall stripers.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 10, 2002
Just when we've fallen in love with Chilean sea bass, a group of chefs has risen to warn us we could love it to death. Only a few years ago, this was a fish living in obscurity in deep, cold ocean waters off South America and with the unappetizing name of Patagonian (or Antarctic) toothfish. But like an aspiring Hollywood starlet, its name was changed and it became a hit. No one cared that Chilean sea bass wasn't really a bass and didn't always come from Chile. With its white, moist flesh, it took leading roles in top American restaurants.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 31, 1993
It was an all-guy evening. The plan was that I would cook supper for my sons, 12 and 8 years old, and then we would watch TV reports telling us whether Baltimore was going to get an invitation to re-enter the National Football League.In case the news from the Chicago meeting of NFL owners was bad, supper had to be good. Geography appeared to be working against Baltimore at the negotiating table. Reports said the owners wanted a Midwestern city. I figured it was time to make geography work for us at the supper table.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | February 13, 1997
HAVRE DE GRACE -- It's a bright winter afternoon, and in the light of the sinking sun even the drab urban and industrial landscapes across the water are suffused with a kind of glow.Gary Neitzey and are I are drifting in his boat in the Patapsco River a couple of miles outside the Key Bridge. We are just off the power plant on Marley Neck, across from the smoky towers of Sparrows Point. To the northwest, where the sharp wind is coming from, we can look upriver to Fort McHenry and the Baltimore Inner Harbor.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | April 25, 1999
Each spring, when leaving the creek at the start of rockfish season, it takes a while to get the feel of a powerboat again -- about 15 seconds, just long enough to throttle forward and thumb the trim switch until the hull is properly on plane and sprinting east toward Chesapeake Bay.It always takes somewhat longer to catch the first keeper of the season, once the 19-footer has been slowed to a crawl and the trolling rigs set.This year, despite 24- and...
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 10, 2002
Just when we've fallen in love with Chilean sea bass, a group of chefs has risen to warn us we could love it to death. Only a few years ago, this was a fish living in obscurity in deep, cold ocean waters off South America and with the unappetizing name of Patagonian (or Antarctic) toothfish. But like an aspiring Hollywood starlet, its name was changed and it became a hit. No one cared that Chilean sea bass wasn't really a bass and didn't always come from Chile. With its white, moist flesh, it took leading roles in top American restaurants.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | March 31, 2002
Local anglers looking for an edge this season don't have to look any further than the shelves of their neighborhood bookstores. Several authors from around these parts spent last year updating or expanding their catalogs, and we're the richer for it. Four books I've scrolled through are real keepers, and I'm sure there are others out there I haven't gotten to yet. Tinkerers will be thrilled to find a soul mate in Keith Walters, author of The Ingenious Angler....
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | February 3, 2002
Flipping around the TV last Saturday, I caught the final weigh-in of the four-day Wal-Mart FLW Tour's season opener. Yeah, I know I trashed bass shows a while back, but this was different. The announcer said the magic word: "Maryland." Sure enough, the winner of the event on Florida's Lake Okeechobee was J.T. Kenney of Frostburg, who took home $110,000. "I never really knew I had the tournament won," Kenney says. "I always thought that if I was catching fish, everyone else was, too." He says he was flipping a Blue Shadow Gambler crawdad with a five-sixteenths-ounce weight into the dirty water around the grasses and bulrushes.
NEWS
December 26, 2001
NEW STATE warnings about eating fish caught in Maryland's lakes and rivers may not affect most consumers. But these health advisories emphasize the harmful legacy of many decades of chemical pollution that still lie in water bottoms and in the eroding soils. Levels of toxic chemicals found in recent state fish surveys have not necessarily increased. What has increased is the federal government's estimate of how much fish the average person eats in a month, now 18 ounces instead of 7 ounces.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2000
On the night Miami toasts one Dolphins quarterback, the Ravens will attempt to roast another. Jay Fiedler, meet the Baltimore pass rush. Having survived a big-play marathon a week ago, the 2-0 Ravens will zero in on Fiedler, Miami's first-year starting quarterback, in a nationally televised showdown of top-rated AFC defenses at Pro Player Stadium. Dave Wannstedt, Miami's first-year head coach, knows the blitz is coming. "That's what they do for a living," he said. "They're one of the best defenses in the league.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | April 25, 1999
Each spring, when leaving the creek at the start of rockfish season, it takes a while to get the feel of a powerboat again -- about 15 seconds, just long enough to throttle forward and thumb the trim switch until the hull is properly on plane and sprinting east toward Chesapeake Bay.It always takes somewhat longer to catch the first keeper of the season, once the 19-footer has been slowed to a crawl and the trolling rigs set.This year, despite 24- and...
SPORTS
By Bill Burton | September 3, 1991
CHESAPEAKE BEACH -- In the ongoing differences between charter skippers and recreational anglers, the latter are not always right. So, let's place some blame where it belongs.We're trolling a school that has just ceased breaking water, but we can't get a strike. They should bite -- if only we could edge 30 feet to the right. But, we can't.For the umpteenth time we're boxed in. Immediately ahead is a private 23-foot Grady White sportsfisherman with a guy at the wheel who doesn't belong at the wheel.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1996
TILGHMAN -- Capt. Bud Harrison was standing along the starboard quarter of his charter boat Beaudacious early last week as a news crew from a Washington television station began conducting an interview on the spring rockfish season.What, Channel 7 reporter Brad Bell asked, were the advantages of going out with a charter boat, as opposed to shoreline fishing or taking out one's own boat?"When you go with a pro, he knows where the fish have been moving, what they have been biting on, and because of that he usually can catch "Harrison had been speaking calmly when the rod positioned in the holder immediately behind him bent deeply and the reel quickly gave out line.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | May 16, 1997
State officials said yesterday that a fish-killing microorganism has been tentatively identified in a river on the Eastern Shore, where watermen have been complaining for months that they're catching fish with sores.But Dorothy L. Leonard, fisheries director, said there isn't enough evidence to say whether the ulcers found on fish in the Pocomoke River were caused by the toxic microorganism, Pfiesteria piscicida, or by something else."We're looking at all the possible causes of these lesions," she said.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | February 23, 1997
John Dawkins spent yesterday morning fishing on a bridge over Saltpeter Creek adjacent to BGE's C.P. Crane power plant in eastern Baltimore County -- a relaxation ritual has attracted several dozen men each weekend for years."
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