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Cataracts

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NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2008
The greatest risk factor for cataracts, which occur when the eye's natural lens hardens and becomes cloudy, is aging, says Dr. Sheri Rowen, director of the Eye and Cosmetic Surgery Center at Mercy Medical Center. In fact, by the time they reach the age of 80, more than 50 percent of all Americans have a cataract or have been treated for cataracts with a relatively simple surgical procedure. Millions of people a year have cataract surgery. What are cataracts? Cataracts are the clouding and hardening of the natural, God-given lens of the eye [made mostly of protein and water, the lens is the clear part of the eye that helps to focus light on the retina]
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | July 19, 2013
 Maryland has joined with 44 other states and the federal government in a $33.5 million fraud settlement case with the maker of an anti-inflammatory drug used after cataract surgery, according to Maryland Attorney General Doug F. Gansler's office. The Maryland Medicaid Program will receive $9,796.51 in the case that accuses ISTA Pharmaceuticals Inc. of marketing the drug Xibrom for uses not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The drugmaker is also accused of paying doctors kickbacks to write presciptions for the medication.
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NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2004
Blacks are almost twice as likely as whites to develop cataracts, according to a new study published today. Released in the latest issue of Ophthalmology, the study also found that a certain form of the disease, cortical cataracts, developed three times as often among blacks. The study nails down what some researchers had already suspected. "There have been no data on eye diseases in people of African descent," said Dr. M. Cristina Leske, an epidemiologist at the University Medical Center at Stony Brook in New York and the study's lead author.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2008
The greatest risk factor for cataracts, which occur when the eye's natural lens hardens and becomes cloudy, is aging, says Dr. Sheri Rowen, director of the Eye and Cosmetic Surgery Center at Mercy Medical Center. In fact, by the time they reach the age of 80, more than 50 percent of all Americans have a cataract or have been treated for cataracts with a relatively simple surgical procedure. Millions of people a year have cataract surgery. What are cataracts? Cataracts are the clouding and hardening of the natural, God-given lens of the eye [made mostly of protein and water, the lens is the clear part of the eye that helps to focus light on the retina]
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Medical Tribune News Service | February 7, 1995
Cataracts are the leading cause of blindness. But a relatively simple outpatient procedure can restore the sight of even the most severely afflicted cataract patients, safely and virtually without complications.For information on cataracts, and what can be done for them, I consulted Dr. Sheila West, an associate professor of ophthalmology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.Q: What are cataracts?A: Located behind the cornea and the pupil, the lens of the eye focuses incoming light. In order for it to do this effectively, the lens must be perfectly transparent.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1995
For Patsy A. Brown, 50, unemployed, broke, with no health insurance and vision clouded by cataracts, Christmas came early yesterday.Early in the morning, a doctor at an outpatient clinic in Glen Burnie removed the cataracts in her right eye, restoring her vision to near normal, for free.It was "the greatest [Christmas present] I've ever, ever had," Mrs. Brown said as she sipped orange juice and nibbled pastries in a recovery room. "I've never had anyone do anything like this for me."Dr. Paul A. Kohlhepp, chief surgeon of the eye center, said the free surgery is "something that we've been trying to do a long time at Christmas time and things just never actually clicked."
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | May 2, 1991
New prescription sunglasses that offer 100 percent protection against harmful ultraviolet-B (UVB) rays and "never wear out" are now available in Baltimore, says Marian Welling of the University of Missouri, St. Louis, School of Optometry.Scientific evidence, reported recently by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine ophthalmologists, has shown that UVB radiation from the sun can cause cataracts, a clouding of the lens of the eye that can lead to blindness.The study of 838 Chesapeake Bay watermen determined there is no such thing as a safe amount of UVB radiation.
FEATURES
By Gary A. Warner and Gary A. Warner,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | September 28, 1997
A river slowly meanders through a valley, the water splashing playfully off the rocks. Gradually it sweeps faster in its path, chasing logs and leaves along in its wake.Rushing, boulder-strewn cataracts churn and thunder, heralding a distant roar that speeds ever closer.The river suddenly disappears into blue sky, the foaming lip of an ever-breaking wave curving the water from horizontal to vertical. A free fall of thousands of feet to a canyon floor below ends violently on once-jagged stones rubbed smooth by a trillion drops of water.
FEATURES
March 4, 1998
Easter treats dyed in bluePrepare yourself for the latest entry in the hot new blue food category: Marshmallow Peeps. Here are a few important facts about these sugary Easter treats, now in blue as well as yellow, white, pink and purple:It takes 6 minutes to make a Peep. In 1953, when they were first "hatched," it took 27 hours.There are some 20 unofficial Web sites devoted to Peeps.Most staggering of all, the recommended serving size is five. That's five Marshmallow Peeps in one sitting.
NEWS
By Newsday | October 30, 1991
THE OZONE layer filters out some of the sun's ultraviolet rays, which cause cancer and cataracts as well as other damage to animals and plants.Recently a U.N. panel of scientists disclosed that ozone depletion over the United States and other countries in the world's temperate zones now extends into the summer months. That, of course, is when ultraviolet rays are strongest and most likely to strike bare skin, to say nothing of crops that could be damaged.The Bush administration basically does not want to hear about ozone depletion, but it simply cannot ignore the latest U.N. findings.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and By Judy Foreman,Special to the Sun | July 22, 2005
Are electric toothbrushes better than manual ones? One type is: The kind with a rotation-oscillation action, such as the Braun Oral B plaque remover. That's the take-home message from an analysis of 42 studies involving 3,855 patients, published in April by the Cochrane Collaboration, a nonprofit international organization that evaluates medical research. These rotation-oscillation devices get rid of plaque -- the sticky stuff that collects on teeth near the gums and contains bacteria that cause cavities and gum disease -- 11 percent more effectively than manual toothbrushes, and reduce gum inflammation 6 percent more effectively over a three-month period, according to the study.
NEWS
By Tom Dunkel and By Tom Dunkel,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2005
You just have to keep your eye very still," Dr. Sheri Rowen says to the patient lying face-up on the gurney next to her. Rowen, director of the Eye and Cosmetic Surgery Center at Mercy Medical Center, is seated at a viewing microscope inside a third-floor operating room. She has zoomed in on the left eye of 68-year-old Lydia Dixon, who is about to become the beneficiary of what Rowen calls "the revolution of our time in my field," words not normally associated with the removal of a cataract.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2004
Blacks are almost twice as likely as whites to develop cataracts, according to a new study published today. Released in the latest issue of Ophthalmology, the study also found that a certain form of the disease, cortical cataracts, developed three times as often among blacks. The study nails down what some researchers had already suspected. "There have been no data on eye diseases in people of African descent," said Dr. M. Cristina Leske, an epidemiologist at the University Medical Center at Stony Brook in New York and the study's lead author.
NEWS
By Tom Infield and Tom Infield,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 29, 2004
PHILADELPHIA -- He still spends most of the year in Chadds Ford, Pa., the crossroads village where he was born in 1917 amid the far-off clamor of World War I. He still occasionally can be seen wandering the hills and watery meadows above the Brandywine River. And when the light is right, he still hastens to his easel in the old schoolhouse with those large, north-facing windows. At 86, and still perhaps America's best-loved artist, Andrew Wyeth is seeing his familiar, small world with new vision -- literally.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | August 26, 1998
Finding that exposure to sunlight increases the risk of cataracts, researchers recommended yesterday that everyone use sunglasses, hats and other steps year-round to cut down on harmful rays.Scientists had known from earlier studies that people who work outdoors, such as Maryland watermen, developed more cataracts than people with less sunlight exposure.But until now, researchers didn't know whether ultraviolet-B rays posed a cataract risk to the general population.Sheila West, a Hopkins professor who was the study's author, said she expected to find deterioration after a high level of exposure.
FEATURES
March 4, 1998
Easter treats dyed in bluePrepare yourself for the latest entry in the hot new blue food category: Marshmallow Peeps. Here are a few important facts about these sugary Easter treats, now in blue as well as yellow, white, pink and purple:It takes 6 minutes to make a Peep. In 1953, when they were first "hatched," it took 27 hours.There are some 20 unofficial Web sites devoted to Peeps.Most staggering of all, the recommended serving size is five. That's five Marshmallow Peeps in one sitting.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | June 20, 1991
While cautious people slather themselves and their children with high-powered sunscreens, some doctors worry that they still may not be ready to face the intensified threat from the sun. Too many people, they say, are leaving the body's most sophisticated and sensitive sensory organs -- the eyes -- exposed.Several studies have shown that increased UV radiation leads to increased risk of cataracts. Most notable among them was a 1985-86 survey of 838 Chesapeake Bay watermen. Those who '' spent the most time in the sun and wore the least protection -- no sunglasses and hats -- had a higher incidence of the disease.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and By Judy Foreman,Special to the Sun | July 22, 2005
Are electric toothbrushes better than manual ones? One type is: The kind with a rotation-oscillation action, such as the Braun Oral B plaque remover. That's the take-home message from an analysis of 42 studies involving 3,855 patients, published in April by the Cochrane Collaboration, a nonprofit international organization that evaluates medical research. These rotation-oscillation devices get rid of plaque -- the sticky stuff that collects on teeth near the gums and contains bacteria that cause cavities and gum disease -- 11 percent more effectively than manual toothbrushes, and reduce gum inflammation 6 percent more effectively over a three-month period, according to the study.
FEATURES
By Gary A. Warner and Gary A. Warner,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | September 28, 1997
A river slowly meanders through a valley, the water splashing playfully off the rocks. Gradually it sweeps faster in its path, chasing logs and leaves along in its wake.Rushing, boulder-strewn cataracts churn and thunder, heralding a distant roar that speeds ever closer.The river suddenly disappears into blue sky, the foaming lip of an ever-breaking wave curving the water from horizontal to vertical. A free fall of thousands of feet to a canyon floor below ends violently on once-jagged stones rubbed smooth by a trillion drops of water.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1995
For Patsy A. Brown, 50, unemployed, broke, with no health insurance and vision clouded by cataracts, Christmas came early yesterday.Early in the morning, a doctor at an outpatient clinic in Glen Burnie removed the cataracts in her right eye, restoring her vision to near normal, for free.It was "the greatest [Christmas present] I've ever, ever had," Mrs. Brown said as she sipped orange juice and nibbled pastries in a recovery room. "I've never had anyone do anything like this for me."Dr. Paul A. Kohlhepp, chief surgeon of the eye center, said the free surgery is "something that we've been trying to do a long time at Christmas time and things just never actually clicked."
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