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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | July 19, 2013
 Maryland has joined with 44 other states and the federal government in a $33.5 million fraud settlement case with the maker of an anti-inflammatory drug used after cataract surgery, according to Maryland Attorney General Doug F. Gansler's office. The Maryland Medicaid Program will receive $9,796.51 in the case that accuses ISTA Pharmaceuticals Inc. of marketing the drug Xibrom for uses not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The drugmaker is also accused of paying doctors kickbacks to write presciptions for the medication.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | July 19, 2013
 Maryland has joined with 44 other states and the federal government in a $33.5 million fraud settlement case with the maker of an anti-inflammatory drug used after cataract surgery, according to Maryland Attorney General Doug F. Gansler's office. The Maryland Medicaid Program will receive $9,796.51 in the case that accuses ISTA Pharmaceuticals Inc. of marketing the drug Xibrom for uses not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The drugmaker is also accused of paying doctors kickbacks to write presciptions for the medication.
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FEATURES
By Gary Legwold | October 23, 1990
Some statistics are real eye-openers: Surgery to remove cataracts has increased threefold in the last 10 years and in recent years about 1.25 million cataract operations were performed in the United States annually.At a glance, those numbers may appear alarming, but ophthalmologists and people who have had cataract surgery within the past few years have a different point of view.The technological advances in cataract surgery are the main reasons for the impressive increase, says Hugh R. Taylor, M.D., an ophthalmologist at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.
EXPLORE
August 27, 2012
The Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins Medicine commemorated the grand opening of its Bel Air and Havre de Grace locations (both formerly Parris-Castoro Eye Care Centers) during a recent ribbon-cutting ceremony. These two sites represent the ninth and 10th satellite offices in the state for the Wilmer Eye Institute. Dignitaries throughout the county and representatives from Johns Hopkins Medicine attended the event. Among them was Ronald R. Peterson, president of The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System and executive vice president of Johns Hopkins Medicine, and Dr. Peter J. McDonnell, William Holland Wilmer Professor of Ophthalmology and director of the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins Medicine.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | July 18, 1994
It's one for the medical textbooks -- a 93-pound sea turtle that couldn't see, but whose sight was saved by cataract surgery.The loggerhead turtle still is recovering and could use a pair of spectacles.A team of ophthalmologists -- an animal eye doctor and a human eye doctor -- performed successful surgery on the turtle June 11 at the National Aquarium in Baltimore to give it a fighting chance to return to the wild.Aquarium officials said they believe it was the first time a sea turtle had undergone surgery for cataracts.
EXPLORE
August 27, 2012
The Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins Medicine commemorated the grand opening of its Bel Air and Havre de Grace locations (both formerly Parris-Castoro Eye Care Centers) during a recent ribbon-cutting ceremony. These two sites represent the ninth and 10th satellite offices in the state for the Wilmer Eye Institute. Dignitaries throughout the county and representatives from Johns Hopkins Medicine attended the event. Among them was Ronald R. Peterson, president of The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System and executive vice president of Johns Hopkins Medicine, and Dr. Peter J. McDonnell, William Holland Wilmer Professor of Ophthalmology and director of the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins Medicine.
FEATURES
September 19, 1998
Here she is, you-know who.The annual "Miss America Pageant" (9 p.m.-midnight, WMAR, Channel 2) in Atlantic City continues its bid for a more NTC contemporary image, with new features including brief profiles filmed in each woman's hometown and an opening number in which, instead of costumes designed for the show, the contestants will wear clothing they selected to reflect their own personalities. But as usual, the current Miss America Kate Shindle will be on hand to crown her successor. Hosts: Meredith Vieira and Boomer Esiason.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff Writer | June 19, 1994
At the Central Maryland Surgery Center in South Baltimore recently, a nurse prepared Mildred Bonadio for cataract surgery by dropping a local anesthetic into her eye.Normally, the patient would be asleep and a physician would have injected the drug with a needle. But the drops, introduced this spring at the center, saved 10 minutes on Mrs. Bonadio's procedure and the others that followed. By 2 p.m., the operating room was running ahead 1 1/2 hours -- enough time to schedule four more patients.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1995
For Patsy A. Brown, 50, unemployed, broke, with no health insurance and vision clouded by cataracts, Christmas came early yesterday.Early in the morning, a doctor at an outpatient clinic in Glen Burnie removed the cataracts in her right eye, restoring her vision to near normal, for free.It was "the greatest [Christmas present] I've ever, ever had," Mrs. Brown said as she sipped orange juice and nibbled pastries in a recovery room. "I've never had anyone do anything like this for me."Dr. Paul A. Kohlhepp, chief surgeon of the eye center, said the free surgery is "something that we've been trying to do a long time at Christmas time and things just never actually clicked."
NEWS
By Tom Infield and Tom Infield,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 29, 2004
PHILADELPHIA -- He still spends most of the year in Chadds Ford, Pa., the crossroads village where he was born in 1917 amid the far-off clamor of World War I. He still occasionally can be seen wandering the hills and watery meadows above the Brandywine River. And when the light is right, he still hastens to his easel in the old schoolhouse with those large, north-facing windows. At 86, and still perhaps America's best-loved artist, Andrew Wyeth is seeing his familiar, small world with new vision -- literally.
NEWS
By Tom Infield and Tom Infield,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 29, 2004
PHILADELPHIA -- He still spends most of the year in Chadds Ford, Pa., the crossroads village where he was born in 1917 amid the far-off clamor of World War I. He still occasionally can be seen wandering the hills and watery meadows above the Brandywine River. And when the light is right, he still hastens to his easel in the old schoolhouse with those large, north-facing windows. At 86, and still perhaps America's best-loved artist, Andrew Wyeth is seeing his familiar, small world with new vision -- literally.
FEATURES
September 19, 1998
Here she is, you-know who.The annual "Miss America Pageant" (9 p.m.-midnight, WMAR, Channel 2) in Atlantic City continues its bid for a more NTC contemporary image, with new features including brief profiles filmed in each woman's hometown and an opening number in which, instead of costumes designed for the show, the contestants will wear clothing they selected to reflect their own personalities. But as usual, the current Miss America Kate Shindle will be on hand to crown her successor. Hosts: Meredith Vieira and Boomer Esiason.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1995
For Patsy A. Brown, 50, unemployed, broke, with no health insurance and vision clouded by cataracts, Christmas came early yesterday.Early in the morning, a doctor at an outpatient clinic in Glen Burnie removed the cataracts in her right eye, restoring her vision to near normal, for free.It was "the greatest [Christmas present] I've ever, ever had," Mrs. Brown said as she sipped orange juice and nibbled pastries in a recovery room. "I've never had anyone do anything like this for me."Dr. Paul A. Kohlhepp, chief surgeon of the eye center, said the free surgery is "something that we've been trying to do a long time at Christmas time and things just never actually clicked."
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | July 18, 1994
It's one for the medical textbooks -- a 93-pound sea turtle that couldn't see, but whose sight was saved by cataract surgery.The loggerhead turtle still is recovering and could use a pair of spectacles.A team of ophthalmologists -- an animal eye doctor and a human eye doctor -- performed successful surgery on the turtle June 11 at the National Aquarium in Baltimore to give it a fighting chance to return to the wild.Aquarium officials said they believe it was the first time a sea turtle had undergone surgery for cataracts.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff Writer | June 19, 1994
At the Central Maryland Surgery Center in South Baltimore recently, a nurse prepared Mildred Bonadio for cataract surgery by dropping a local anesthetic into her eye.Normally, the patient would be asleep and a physician would have injected the drug with a needle. But the drops, introduced this spring at the center, saved 10 minutes on Mrs. Bonadio's procedure and the others that followed. By 2 p.m., the operating room was running ahead 1 1/2 hours -- enough time to schedule four more patients.
FEATURES
By Gary Legwold | October 23, 1990
Some statistics are real eye-openers: Surgery to remove cataracts has increased threefold in the last 10 years and in recent years about 1.25 million cataract operations were performed in the United States annually.At a glance, those numbers may appear alarming, but ophthalmologists and people who have had cataract surgery within the past few years have a different point of view.The technological advances in cataract surgery are the main reasons for the impressive increase, says Hugh R. Taylor, M.D., an ophthalmologist at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1992
Chesapeake Biological Laboratories Inc.Chesapeake Biological Laboratories, Inc., a Baltimore biotechnology company, reported an increase in earnings to $222,000 in the first quarter ended June 30, compared with $10,000 in the same period the year before.The company attributed the gain to an increase in orders for two of the company's products, Vitrax, a medical device used in the eye during cataract surgery, and Equron, a drug injected into the joints of race horses to reduce the inflammation associated with arthritis.
EXPLORE
August 22, 2011
Dr. Candice Giordano, has joined Seidenberg Protzko Eye Associates. She will see patients of all ages in the Havre de Grace and Bel Air offices. She will also perform cataract surgery at the Mid-Atlantic Surgery Pavilion in Aberdeen. Giordano is a Baltimore native and her husband, Dr. Michael Giordano, is the assistant director of the emergency department at Harford Memorial Hospital. Candice Giordano completed her undergraduate degree with honors from Bucknell University.
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