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NEWS
July 19, 1991
President Bush's visit to Greece and Turkey, far from being a mere asterisk to the London economic summit, could open the way to new diplomatic initiatives to solve the Cyprus problem. Rarely have U.S. relations been better (simultaneously) with Athens and Ankara, both of which have the present good fortune to have sensible governments.The dispute over Cyprus is rooted in centuries-old ethnic differences between the Greek-Cypriot and Turkish-Cypriot populations. But the political and territorial division of the island goes back only three decades, to the withdrawal of British colonial control and the consequent emergence of nationalist feelings.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
The Arc Baltimore said Monday that it expects to launch an employment-assistance program for people with developmental disabilities, an effort helped by a $160,000 grant from the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation. Weinberg's two-year funding to the group is a "challenge grant" that requires matching dollars. The Arc Baltimore has raised the first $80,000. The group's planned program, Career Catalyst, will be in Hunt Valley. Adults with development disabilities would receive job-readiness education and internships.
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BUSINESS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2000
During her seven-year heroin haze, fueled by off-the-books cashier jobs, Richell Parks-White would wander downtown Baltimore streets as if she were in a different world. To the struggling mother of five, the sharply dressed business men and women en route to their corporate jobs in tall buildings seemed foreign. She never dreamed she could be one of them. In a few weeks, however, she will join that elusive corporate culture and stake a claim in the dot-com world as a junior Web page designer.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2014
Dr. Robert E. Cooke, a retired Johns Hopkins pediatrician-in-chief who was a founder of the Head Start children's program and a presidential medical adviser, died of heart disease Feb. 2 at his Oak Bluffs home on Martha's Vineyard, Mass. The former North Roland Park resident was 93. "We have lost a true visionary, whose acumen, passion and dedication have influenced generations of pediatricians and changed the lives of millions of children," said Dr. Paul B. Rothman, dean of the medical faculty and chief executive officer of Johns Hopkins Medicine.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 4, 2005
The title captures this film's harrowing qualities, but not its energy, its limpid beauty or its spiritual grace. The eight "red-light kids" of Sonagachi, Calcutta, at the center of this documentary are indeed Born Into Brothels, which would normally mean they grow up without any expectation of happiness or accomplishment. The parents would sell their daughters into marriage or (more likely) break them into prostitution. The sons would do odd brothel jobs before drifting into gangsterism and the drug trade.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2012
In the end, Monae Turnage, lying in a casket with a white beaded gown and purple bangle bracelets, could be a catalyst for change in her East Baltimore neighborhood, her pastor told a crowd of roughly 700 at her funeral Saturday. The Rev. Donte L. Hickman St., pastor of Southern Baptist Church, said he hoped Monae's killing would spur East Baltimore to return to its roots — to again become a place where neighbors sit on porches, watch over children, hold their hands when they cross the street and make sure they go to school "If you want something different, you've got to expect something different," Hickman said in a booming voice.
SPORTS
By Don Markus | September 7, 1991
To the rest of the country, Jim McKay is the man who held overnight vigil in an ABC broadcast booth during the massacre of Israeli athletes at the 1972 Olympics and the man who has traveled the wide world of sports for the past thirtysomething years.But to Maryland, and its horse racing community, Jim McKay is the man who brought a number of previously warring factions together for an event that in its first five years has made an impact both locally and nationally. In many ways, Jim McKay is the Maryland Million.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2001
What about Jerry Hairston? That's the question Orioles officials expected to hear once news broke that they had chosen Louisiana State second baseman Mike Fontenot with the 19th pick in the amateur baseball draft. What about a home-grown player who's holding onto the job with both hands, daring anyone to pry it loose? A player who's only a week beyond his 25th birthday and seemingly entrenched at the position for many years to come? Syd Thrift, Orioles' vice president of baseball operations, began his reply by invoking the name of a Hall of Famer.
NEWS
February 11, 1996
Felice N. Schwartz, 71, a women's rights activist who spent three decades prying open corporate America's male-dominated boardrooms in a struggle that spawned the phrase "mommy track," died of a heart attack Thursday at her New York home. In 1962 she founded Catalyst, a nonprofit company that helped women entering the work force, and built it into a nationally recognized group.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2002
Michael Rosenbaum sat in his Harvard Law School class a few years ago thinking about jobs - not for himself, but for others living in his home state of Maryland. He had had comfortable upbringing in the Washington suburbs and was about to earn his third college degree. But not everyone had his opportunities. "I was thinking there was an untapped resource in our cities," he said. "I wanted to identify the smartest and most capable and give those people skills. That would benefit the people, the cities and the companies that hired them."
NEWS
July 9, 2013
A recent Sun editorial linked the planned reopening of the Contemporary Museum with "newly designated arts districts. " including the Station North Arts & Entertainment District immediately north of Penn Station ("The Contemporary returns," July 8). In 1991, after I had leased the Charles Theatre as an "art film house" and was negotiating to lease the Everyman Theatre in the 1700 block of North Charles Street, I was contacted by Contemporary co-founder and director George Ciscle, requesting a rent-free exhibit in the former Famous Ballroom (now part of the expanded Charles Theatre )
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2012
Like a one-two punch, two major Maryland employers in the health care service and pharmaceutical industries were the targets last week of multibillion-dollar acquisition deals. Both homegrown companies — Human Genome Sciences Inc. and Catalyst Health Solutions Inc. — are based in Rockville. Both were courted by out-of-state companies. Human Genome ultimately rebuffed a $2.6 billion offer by biopharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline, saying it was too low. But Catalyst agreed to be acquired by a larger Illinois competitor for $4.4 billion, and Human Genome has officially acknowledged it's on the market.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2012
In the end, Monae Turnage, lying in a casket with a white beaded gown and purple bangle bracelets, could be a catalyst for change in her East Baltimore neighborhood, her pastor told a crowd of roughly 700 at her funeral Saturday. The Rev. Donte L. Hickman St., pastor of Southern Baptist Church, said he hoped Monae's killing would spur East Baltimore to return to its roots — to again become a place where neighbors sit on porches, watch over children, hold their hands when they cross the street and make sure they go to school "If you want something different, you've got to expect something different," Hickman said in a booming voice.
EXPLORE
June 30, 2011
Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz today formally congratulated Towson for being named to CNN Money Magazine's list of best places to live for the rich and single. At a ceremony held at the Towson Farmers' market, Nancy Hafford, executive director of the Towson Chamber of Commerce, accepted a citation — and a flower — from Kamenetz. Other officials, including 5th District County Councilman David Marks, and 3rd District Councilman Todd Huff — himself a former chamber president — also took part in the presentation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2011
Marin Alsop generates the lion's share of attention as the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's music director, but she is not the only conductor with a knack for bringing success to the institution. Jack Everly has been doing that since 2003 with the BSO SuperPops, and he's planning to stay on the job at least until 2017. Everly just signed a five-year extension of his contract as principal pops conductor, a significant vote of confidence on both sides. His current contract was to have expired in 2012.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | February 25, 2011
A stiff neck shouldn't be much to worry about. But when that stiff neck is attached to the wonky back of Brian Roberts, the team's offensive catalyst who played in just 59 games in 2010 because of a herniated disk, there is cause for concern. Roberts missed an Orioles team workout for a third consecutive day today. President of baseball operations Andy MacPhail said the Orioles aren't sweating it and that Roberts has gotten better day by day. But you can't help but worry a little bit about the second baseman's condition getting worse as the spring progresses.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | January 5, 1999
Nearly three months after a reactor explosion that injured five of its workers, Condea Vista resumed production at its South Baltimore plant late yesterday.Condea Vista, which makes a key ingredient in household cleaners, received the state's permission to start up the plant after signing a consent decree Dec. 24 with the Maryland Department of the Environment.In the decree, the chemical manufacturer admitted to illegally discharging visible emissions, failing to take reasonable precautions to prevent the accident and creating a public nuisance.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Special to The Sun | January 4, 2008
Will the return of Adauto Neto be the catalyst the Blast needs to return to their winning ways? The answer will begin to unfold tonight at 1st Mariner Arena when Baltimore's pro soccer team strives to end a five-game losing streak against the surprising New Jersey Ironmen. Ironmen@Blast Tonight, 7:35, 680 AM
NEWS
By Michael Justin Lee | January 22, 2009
Psychologists have a term to describe a patient's utter inability to experience pleasure: anhedonia. I can't help concluding that the American public is experiencing a debilitating bout of economic anhedonia right now. This mood is antithetical to the American can-do spirit and will limit the efficacy of even the best structured economic stimulus package to come. It is important to note that the psychological manifestation of anhedonia is called depression. The economic analogy is both clear and ominous.
NEWS
November 20, 2008
9 touchdown passes thrown in Arundel's 47-28 win over Severna Park in the teams' regular-season meeting Oct. 17. Arundel QB Billy Cosh threw for five; Severna Park starter Sam Jones accounted for three; and the Falcons' backup had one. The teams will meet again in the Class 4A East regional final tomorrow. 124 tackles this season by Severna Park senior LB Sean Price, which leads the team. The Falcons' defensive catalyst is averaging 11-plus tackles per game.
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