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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2011
Rosina D. Squires, a retired Montgomery Ward catalog worker who liked to garden, died Wednesday of vascular dementia at Ellicott City Rehabilitation Center. The longtime Elkridge resident was 87. The daughter of an immigrant Italian construction worker and a seamstress, Rosina Delores DePinto was born in Baltimore and raised on High Street in Little Italy. She attended a business school, family members said, where she studied to be a secretary. She later worked for 15 years in the mail order department of the old Montgomery Ward store on Monroe Street until retiring in the early 1980s.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2014
Kanye West knows he is often painted as a brooding egotist, but during his Baltimore Arena concert Friday night, the 36-year-old rapper wanted fans to know he was happy. “Don't believe the pictures of me looking mad,” West told the crowd, adding he felt like he was in his living room speaking with friends.  The 15-minute rant was filled with hallmarks many have come to expect from the controversial artist: Cursing “the media,” denouncing “haters” and still, inexplicably, taking shots at “Saturday Night Live.” But, above all else, the speech - given after the night's cathartic, emotional centerpiece “Runaway” - felt more inclusive and aspirational than self-serving.
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NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | November 20, 2010
With the advent of the Web and e-readers, the lure of the holiday catalog should diminish if not disappear. But you just cannot relax with a cup of hot cocoa and thumb through this year's toy catalog — or one of its grown-up versions, from Brookstone to L.L. Bean to PBS — online. You have to have the real thing in your hands, so you can flip back and forth between the pages in a senseless, inefficient, joyful way. As a former advertising copywriter, I am one of those people who actually reads every word of the descriptive catalog copy.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2013
In the midst of sorting a mound of yellowed newspapers in the hot attic of a century-old building in Mount Vernon, Arnie VandeBrake would occasionally pause, caught up by letters from the volatile early days of the gay rights movement. "The correspondence would be so poignant, it would feel like a disservice just to put it down and not understand what it meant," said VandeBrake, 30. As the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore prepares to relocate this fall after more than 30 years at its West Chase Street headquarters, a small group of volunteers is working to compile, catalog and preserve records they say highlight the history of the center and the trajectory of the nation through a time of rapid changes.
FEATURES
By ANN CAMERON | August 30, 1998
Editor's note: In this chapter from the book 'The Stories Julian Tells,' an older brother's tall tale backfires, and his father unexpectedly saves the day."Well, Huey and Julian," my father said, "today is the big day. The catalog is here.""The catalog is here! The catalog is here! The catalog is here!" Huey said. He was dancing and twirling around.I was thinking about going someplace else."What's the matter, Julian?" my father said. "Don't you want to see the catalog?""Oh yes, I - want to see it," I said.
NEWS
By Ann Egerton | December 17, 1992
A RECENT newspaper article said people are doing thei Christmas shopping late this year, so catalog retailers will come up short. If my situation is typical, they're going to be mightily disappointed.To date, I've received 104 catalogs, not counting duplicates, and have placed orders for less than $400. That works out to about $4 per catalog. I doubt that my orders justify the cost of design, artwork, prose, printing and postage in the 10 3/4 -inch pile I've accumulated.Maybe catalogs are expensive relics of the buy-it-now '80s.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer On Gardening | December 31, 2009
J anuary is National Mailorder Gardening Month, and the mailboxes of gardeners will soon be stuffed with tomatoes and melons, peas and perennials. Although most of these catalogs are photographic wonders, few will have the graceful and historic beauty of the catalog the D. Landreth Seed Co. has produced to celebrate 225 years of teaching people how to garden. "Starting in the 1840s, the Landreths educated Americans about gardening - and about more than gardening," said owner Barbara Melera.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2010
Question: Is ordering plants from catalogs or the Internet a good idea? Answer: Beware plants from the West Coast that may harbor Sudden Oak Death disease (Phytophthora ramorum). Last year an infected nursery shipped 28 plants to Maryland customers. Twenty-two were tracked down, tested, and an infected witchhazel was found and destroyed. Not only oaks but a vast number of plant species are killed by this disease. If it gets loose here, it would devastate the East Coast. To avoid that possibility, buy from local nurseries and garden centers.
NEWS
September 15, 1991
J. C. Penney Co. will open a catalog sales center at Normandy Shopping Center on Wednesday.The center will offer shop-at-home telephone service. Orders may be picked up at the sales center or delivered.The catalog will also be available at the store.NETWORK ADDS CUSTOMERNetwork Designs, the Columbia-based local and wide area networking systems integrations firm, has recently added WorldWatch Institute of Washington as a network maintenance customer.BENDIX GETS CONTRACTBendix Field Engineering of Columbia was awarded a contract by the U.S. Air Force Logistics Command to maintain and perform engineering modifications on the Space Command's Satellite Control Network.
FEATURES
By Mary Gottschalk and Mary Gottschalk,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | November 13, 1991
Hope that the cachet of French fashion will translate into cash is the impetus behind two new mail-order catalogs and the recent opening of a French department store in New York City. While the Gallic glories of Galeries Lafayette can be sampled in the Big Apple, La Redoute and Madeleine fashion catalogs are anxious to drop by your mailbox if you'll just call and invite them.La Redoute is the largest catalog house in France, so it makes sense that it has teamed with its American counterpart, Sears, for distribution on this side of the Atlantic.
NEWS
By Jay R. Thompson, For The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2013
Pasadena resident Bill Hubick and Jim Brighton of Easton stand on a wooden overlook at the edge of a shallow pond at Wooten's Landing Park in the Harwood area of southern Anne Arundel. It's silent, except for animals. On a whim, Brighton asks Hubick to name every creature he can hear. After a brief silence, Hubick begins: "Carolina wren, Carolina chickadee, white-breasted nuthatch, green frog, Acadian flycatcher, white-eyed vireo …" It's a moment of levity, but one that illustrates how immersed Hubick, 36, and Brighton, 42, are in their mission.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | February 4, 2013
If the Super Bowl is over, can spring and the gardening season be far away? Well, yes. If holidays are the markers on the highway to warm weather, we still have to get through Valentine's Day, St. Patrick's Day and this year's early Easter. Not to mention an unexpected snowstorm or two. But the inveterate gardener is sustained during this time of year by catalogs. Lots of catalogs, which start arriving just after Christmas, covers bursting with gorgeous tomatoes or dahlias or foxglove or peppers.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
This month, 900 Strayer University students walked across the stage at 1st Mariner Arena during a regional commencement ceremony in which they were awarded bachelor's degrees from an institution whose Baltimore roots date to the late 19th century. Strayer's Business College began in Baltimore in 1892 as the brainchild of Seibert Irving Strayer, a Bucknell University graduate who was a writer and shorthand innovator. In 1902, he was joined by Thomas W. Donoho, a former manager of a typewriter company and a lawyer who later headed the Baltimore school.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2012
Concerned that Baltimore is in danger of losing valuable aspects of its African-American heritage, civil rights activists and preservationists gathered at City Hall Tuesday to urge the formation of a Baltimore City African-American Civil Rights Historic Commission. As outlined in legislation introduced in June, the panel's mission would be to "catalog, preserve, link and promote" resources memorializing the "pioneering civil rights struggle which occurred in Baltimore City in the 1950s and 60s," as well as other key moments in local African-American history.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2012
"It looks like a big, sweaty, sexy mess of people out there," said Maroon 5 singer Adam Levine to the Preakness InfieldFEST crowd. His eyes did not deceive him. The Los Angeles pop-rock group proved to be an excellent choice for the InfieldFEST crowd, with its handsome TV-judge frontman (Levine is on NBC's "The Voice") and earworm pop. Throughout its 80-minute set, Maroon 5 kept reminding the large crowd how surprisingly deep its 10-year catalog runs. There were old favorites ("This Love" and "Sunday Morning")
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2011
Rosina D. Squires, a retired Montgomery Ward catalog worker who liked to garden, died Wednesday of vascular dementia at Ellicott City Rehabilitation Center. The longtime Elkridge resident was 87. The daughter of an immigrant Italian construction worker and a seamstress, Rosina Delores DePinto was born in Baltimore and raised on High Street in Little Italy. She attended a business school, family members said, where she studied to be a secretary. She later worked for 15 years in the mail order department of the old Montgomery Ward store on Monroe Street until retiring in the early 1980s.
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Knight-Ridder Tribune News Service | May 21, 1995
Q: Where can I find information on and values of German beer glasses I've collected over the years?A: Write Andre Ammelounx, P.O. Box 136, Palatine, Ill. 60078, who buys and auctions such glasses, beakers, steins and related items.Or send $15 for a copy of his May 31, 1995, Mail Bid Stein Auction Catalogue. It pictures 548 lots in color including Mettlach, character, stoneware and brewery steins; glasses; tankards; and other items such as plates, plaques, punch bowls, vases (many of which are Mettlach examples)
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2011
It's cool one August morning in a forest near the marsh, quiet but for the occasional bellowing of a few green frogs, and two experts on Maryland's flora and fauna are preparing for a sticky mission. Earl "Bud" Reaves dons a wide-brimmed hat and pulls on a pair of hip waders. "A bad day in the woods is better than a good day somewhere else," says Reaves, a forester for Anne Arundel County. Chris Swarth, clad in a tie-dyed shirt, pulls a bright red flag from his jeans. "We're going to find that tree, and we're going to mark it," says Swarth, the ecologist who directs the Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary in southernmost Anne Arundel County.
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