Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCaswell
IN THE NEWS

Caswell

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 5, 2004
On Friday, January 30, 2004, BERNARD W. CASWELL, died of natural causes; father of Michael H. Caswell of Pasadena, Cecilia Caswell-Whiting of Virginia, Loretta Farb of Ellicott City and Sara Smith of Glen Burnie. Also survived by former wife Janet Caswell of Pasadena and sister Eileen Hand of Virginia and three grandchildren. At his request, there will be no services.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 18, 2007
On February 15, 2007, WINIFRED "Winnie" G. CASWELL ENGELMEYER (nee Wingrove); beloved mother of Barbara Caswell Hopkins, Leroy Caswell, Bert Caswell, Steven Caswell and Sharon Caswell Newman; loving grandmother of Melissa, Janet, Robert, Jennifer, James, Leroy, Rick and Ashley; dear great-grandmother of Tara, Ryan, Madison, Grace and Garett. Also survived by many other family and friends. Relatives and friends are invited to call at the SCHIMUNEK FUNERAL HOME OF BEL AIR, INC., 610 W. McPhail Road (at Route 24)
Advertisement
NEWS
February 18, 2007
On February 15, 2007, WINIFRED "Winnie" G. CASWELL ENGELMEYER (nee Wingrove); beloved mother of Barbara Caswell Hopkins, Leroy Caswell, Bert Caswell, Steven Caswell and Sharon Caswell Newman; loving grandmother of Melissa, Janet, Robert, Jennifer, James, Leroy, Rick and Ashley; dear great-grandmother of Tara, Ryan, Madison, Grace and Garett. Also survived by many other family and friends. Relatives and friends are invited to call at the SCHIMUNEK FUNERAL HOME OF BEL AIR, INC., 610 W. McPhail Road (at Route 24)
BUSINESS
By The Boston Globe | February 1, 2007
The rise of digital photography spelled doom for the old-fashioned instant film cameras from Polaroid Corp. But now a team of Polaroid veterans plans to make digital cameras more like classic Polaroids, with a device that fits in a shirt pocket and prints digital snapshots in seconds, without using ink. "It's going to go places where no printer has gone before," said Wendy Caswell, president and chief executive of Zink Imaging LLC. Zink unveiled its...
NEWS
June 10, 2005
RHEA LYNNETTE CASWELL passed away quietly in her home Saturday, June 4, 2005, in the early evening. She had been battling cancer. She is survived by her sister, niece, nephews, a great niece, a great nephew and her brother. There will be a celebration of life in both her home town in Florida and Maryland. In lieu of flowers, donations to your local hospice Care Center or to the American Lung Cancer Society or to your local animal shelter in Rhea's name would be appreciated.
NEWS
By Lorraine Gingerich and Lorraine Gingerich,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 12, 2002
EVEN BEFORE Gov. Parris N. Glendening announced Level 1 water restrictions, western Howard County families on wells have long known about conserving water. Jane Caswell of Highland has been doing it for three years. Caswell says her well nearly went dry in the spring, and she knew it was time for a new one. "It was a really good little well," she said "It's been in here since 1941." But the drought caught up with her. Her old well, a 23-foot, hand-dug well in her basement, had served her nicely for the first three years she lived in her house.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2001
In the 1960s, Linda Van Hart, then a Sykesville High School student, saw many of her older friends demonstrate for civil rights. They marched, organized sit-ins and helped with voter registration drives throughout the South. Van Hart has long regretted she couldn't join them because she was too young. Now a Western Maryland College professor, Van Hart is retracing those first steps in the Deep South with a group studying nonviolence and its effects on society today. "I felt robbed in the '60s because I could not go," Van Hart said.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2001
In the 1960s, Linda Van Hart, then a Sykesville High School student, saw many of her older friends demonstrate for civil rights. They marched, organized sit-ins and helped with voter registration drives throughout the South. Van Hart has long regretted she couldn't join them because she was too young. Now a Western Maryland College professor, Van Hart is retracing those first steps in the Deep South with a group studying nonviolence and its effects on society today. "I felt robbed in the '60s because I could not go," Van Hart said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joel B. Obermayer and Joel B. Obermayer,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 9, 2002
It's 10 p.m. and three young guys from out-of-town are cruising the Inner Harbor in a flashy Ford F-150 Super Crew 4x4. In the next lane, a comely brunette with raspberry lipstick checks them out. She's talking on a cell phone, but she's eyeing the guy in the passenger seat. She looks at him harder. She smiles and mouths a word: "geek." The object of her stare never sees her. He's too busy pointing a cylindrical antenna nearly 3 feet long through the window. All he cares about is transmissions from wireless networks in the buildings they're cruising by. For Brian Caswell, it's a great way to spend a Friday night.
NEWS
April 5, 1991
Melvin L. Gobrecht, a retired mailer at the Baltimore Sun, died Wednesday of cancer at his home on Caswell Avenue in Ferndale. He was 61.Services for Mr. Gobrecht were being held today at the Kirkley funeral establishment, 421 Crain Highway South, Glen Burnie.He served in the Marine Corps in the Korean War.The Baltimore native attended the Mergenthaler Vocational Technical High School and was a member of the Howard Lodge of the Masons.He is survived by his wife of 37 years, the former Doris Fern Wehnert; two sons, James William Gobrecht of Severn and Thomas Marion Gobrecht of Baltimore; and four grandchildren.
NEWS
June 10, 2005
RHEA LYNNETTE CASWELL passed away quietly in her home Saturday, June 4, 2005, in the early evening. She had been battling cancer. She is survived by her sister, niece, nephews, a great niece, a great nephew and her brother. There will be a celebration of life in both her home town in Florida and Maryland. In lieu of flowers, donations to your local hospice Care Center or to the American Lung Cancer Society or to your local animal shelter in Rhea's name would be appreciated.
NEWS
February 5, 2004
On Friday, January 30, 2004, BERNARD W. CASWELL, died of natural causes; father of Michael H. Caswell of Pasadena, Cecilia Caswell-Whiting of Virginia, Loretta Farb of Ellicott City and Sara Smith of Glen Burnie. Also survived by former wife Janet Caswell of Pasadena and sister Eileen Hand of Virginia and three grandchildren.At his request, there will be no services.
NEWS
By Lorraine Gingerich and Lorraine Gingerich,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 12, 2002
EVEN BEFORE Gov. Parris N. Glendening announced Level 1 water restrictions, western Howard County families on wells have long known about conserving water. Jane Caswell of Highland has been doing it for three years. Caswell says her well nearly went dry in the spring, and she knew it was time for a new one. "It was a really good little well," she said "It's been in here since 1941." But the drought caught up with her. Her old well, a 23-foot, hand-dug well in her basement, had served her nicely for the first three years she lived in her house.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joel B. Obermayer and Joel B. Obermayer,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 9, 2002
It's 10 p.m. and three young guys from out-of-town are cruising the Inner Harbor in a flashy Ford F-150 Super Crew 4x4. In the next lane, a comely brunette with raspberry lipstick checks them out. She's talking on a cell phone, but she's eyeing the guy in the passenger seat. She looks at him harder. She smiles and mouths a word: "geek." The object of her stare never sees her. He's too busy pointing a cylindrical antenna nearly 3 feet long through the window. All he cares about is transmissions from wireless networks in the buildings they're cruising by. For Brian Caswell, it's a great way to spend a Friday night.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2001
In the 1960s, Linda Van Hart, then a Sykesville High School student, saw many of her older friends demonstrate for civil rights. They marched, organized sit-ins and helped with voter registration drives throughout the South. Van Hart has long regretted she couldn't join them because she was too young. Now a Western Maryland College professor, Van Hart is retracing those first steps in the Deep South with a group studying nonviolence and its effects on society today. "I felt robbed in the '60s because I could not go," Van Hart said.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2001
In the 1960s, Linda Van Hart, then a Sykesville High School student, saw many of her older friends demonstrate for civil rights. They marched, organized sit-ins and helped with voter registration drives throughout the South. Van Hart has long regretted she couldn't join them because she was too young. Now a Western Maryland College professor, Van Hart is retracing those first steps in the Deep South with a group studying nonviolence and its effects on society today. "I felt robbed in the '60s because I could not go," Van Hart said.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.