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By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 13, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Maryland Casualty Co. officials figured they were free and clear. Their policy covering a Baltimore mechanical contracting firm now being sued by asbestosis victims had expired years ago.But the state Court of Appeals reshaped their thinking a bit yesterday. The company must pay legal fees to defend Lloyd E. Mitchell Inc., in each of the 3,000 asbestos cases filed against it and must pay any judgments against the firm, within policy limits, Maryland's highest court ruled.The "bodily injury" that plaintiffs cited in their suits occurred while Maryland Casualty's policies were in effect, even if the disease resulting from those injuries didn't surface for more than a decade, the unanimous court held.
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BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2012
Homeowners should be wary of property insurers trying to charge percentage deductibles for damage caused by Sandy, the hurricane-turned-post-tropical-cyclone, according to a bulletin released Tuesday by the Maryland Insurance Administration. Only if the National Hurricane Center of the National Weather Service issues a hurricane warning for Maryland can property and casualty insurance carriers charge a percentage deductible - instead of the more familiar flat-rate deductible - for damage done by a hurricane or other storm, according to Maryland law. The National Hurricane Center did not issue a hurricane warning for Maryland before Sandy hit. Therefore, most homeowners should be charged a flat rate “dollar deductible” on their property insurance claims, not a deductible that is calculated as a percentage of the total value of the policy.
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BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | April 5, 1991
USF&G Corp., the Baltimore-based insurance company, is getting back to basics and forgoing much of its diversification efforts of the 1980s, according to Norman P. Blake, who is chairman, president and chief executive officer."
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Sun Columnist | June 5, 2007
A Honda Element slammed into the rear end of Charlie Lusco's Dodge Caravan on Harford Road late on a December night. Finding what would end up being hundreds of dollars' worth of repairs, Lusco and his wife, Deborah, who was driving, did almost everything they were supposed to do after an accident. They called the police. They wrote down the officer's name and the number of their complaint report. They wrote down the model, color and license plate of the other driver's car. Ignoring the 18-year-old driver's request to "forget the whole thing," the Luscos insisted on exchanging insurance information.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Sun Columnist | June 5, 2007
A Honda Element slammed into the rear end of Charlie Lusco's Dodge Caravan on Harford Road late on a December night. Finding what would end up being hundreds of dollars' worth of repairs, Lusco and his wife, Deborah, who was driving, did almost everything they were supposed to do after an accident. They called the police. They wrote down the officer's name and the number of their complaint report. They wrote down the model, color and license plate of the other driver's car. Ignoring the 18-year-old driver's request to "forget the whole thing," the Luscos insisted on exchanging insurance information.
NEWS
May 15, 2003
Dr. Charles J. Blazek Jr., a retired internist and former Maryland Casualty Insurance Co. medical director, died of complications from an infection Sunday at St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 82. Dr. Blazek was born in Baltimore and raised in Flushing, N.Y. He earned his undergraduate and medical degrees from Columbia University, and served in the Army briefly at the end of World War II. After completing a residency in internal medicine at Bellevue Hospital in New York City, he returned to Baltimore in 1950 and established a private medical practice on St. Paul Street.
NEWS
January 29, 1997
Robert D. Kilpatrick,72, who helped form Cigna Corp. and build it into one of the nation's largest insurance companies, died of bone marrow cancer Monday in Richmond, Va.As president and chief executive officer of the insurance company Connecticut General, he played a leading role in bringing about a merger with INA Corp. in 1982 that formed Cigna. Under Mr. Kilpatrick's leadership, Cigna became a major commercial and casualty insurance company, and developed the base that would later allow it to become prominent in the business of health maintenance organizations.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | December 11, 1992
The Penn Central Corp. announced yesterday that it intend to sell all of its non-insurance operating units, including the Vitro Corp., the company's large defense operations in Silver Spring.Vitro, which has about 1,600 employees at the Maryland complex, is involved in systems and software engineering services to the Navy, Air Force, Army and the National Aeronautical and Space Administration.Philip A. Hagel, vice president and treasurer of Penn Central, said the Navy was Vitro's biggest contractor.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2000
Farmers Insurance Group will close an insurance call center in Timonium by year-end, a move that will eliminate 114 jobs, a company official said yesterday. Carol Siegfried, Farmers' president of group distribution, said the Los Angeles-based insurer is shifting the work to Grand Rapids, Mich., where it operates another call center. "It is a financial decision," said Siegfried, who declined to disclose how much the company will save by closing the center. Employees were told of the plans late last week, and job cuts will begin Oct. 1 in a "gradual transition," Siegfried said.
NEWS
April 4, 2003
Athalee H. Goodwin, a retired insurance clerk and former Northeast Baltimore resident, died of lung cancer Tuesday in the hospice unit of Lehigh Valley Hospital in Allentown, Pa. She was 76. Born and raised Athalee Hardin in Jacksboro, Tenn., where she graduated from high school, she moved to Baltimore during World War II and took a job at Maryland Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. in Fairfield. Mrs. Goodwin retired in 1975 after a decade as a clerk at Maryland Casualty Insurance Co. She was married in 1946 to Raymond L. Goodwin.
BUSINESS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | February 7, 2007
Allstate Corp. and other insurers could be forced to write homeowner policies throughout Maryland, including coastal areas where some companies have pulled out, under legislation being drafted in the General Assembly. Del. David D. Rudolph, vice chairman of the House Economic Matters Committee, said yesterday that he plans to introduce the bill but that specific language has yet to be worked out. Rudolph said he is responding in part to Allstate's announcement in December that it would stop writing new homeowner policies in the state's coastal areas.
NEWS
May 15, 2003
Dr. Charles J. Blazek Jr., a retired internist and former Maryland Casualty Insurance Co. medical director, died of complications from an infection Sunday at St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 82. Dr. Blazek was born in Baltimore and raised in Flushing, N.Y. He earned his undergraduate and medical degrees from Columbia University, and served in the Army briefly at the end of World War II. After completing a residency in internal medicine at Bellevue Hospital in New York City, he returned to Baltimore in 1950 and established a private medical practice on St. Paul Street.
NEWS
April 4, 2003
Athalee H. Goodwin, a retired insurance clerk and former Northeast Baltimore resident, died of lung cancer Tuesday in the hospice unit of Lehigh Valley Hospital in Allentown, Pa. She was 76. Born and raised Athalee Hardin in Jacksboro, Tenn., where she graduated from high school, she moved to Baltimore during World War II and took a job at Maryland Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. in Fairfield. Mrs. Goodwin retired in 1975 after a decade as a clerk at Maryland Casualty Insurance Co. She was married in 1946 to Raymond L. Goodwin.
NEWS
July 29, 2002
New principals will matter for failing schools I was disappointed to read The Sun's negative reaction to state Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick's plan to put high-powered principals in failing schools and raise their salary to $125,000 ("A matter of principal," editorial, July 19). As a substitute teacher in the Howard County public school system and adjunct economics instructor at Howard Community College, I have followed the lack of progress on education with considerable interest over the years.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2000
Farmers Insurance Group will close an insurance call center in Timonium by year-end, a move that will eliminate 114 jobs, a company official said yesterday. Carol Siegfried, Farmers' president of group distribution, said the Los Angeles-based insurer is shifting the work to Grand Rapids, Mich., where it operates another call center. "It is a financial decision," said Siegfried, who declined to disclose how much the company will save by closing the center. Employees were told of the plans late last week, and job cuts will begin Oct. 1 in a "gradual transition," Siegfried said.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | January 27, 1999
In a reorganization of its U.S. commercial insurance businesses, Zurich Financial Services Group could lay off as many as 850 employees -- including an unspecified number in Baltimore -- a top company official said yesterday.Frank A. Patalano, chief executive of the newly created subsidiary Zurich Services, also said Baltimore is no longer the headquarters for the Swiss company's commercial and small business insurance operations, which will be directed from Schaumburg, Ill. The Baltimore and Schaumburg operations have been folded into another newly created subsidiary, Zurich U.S.Patalano, who works out of Schaumburg and has run the Baltimore operations since Dec. 1, said the company expects to save $80 million to $100 million over the next two years by consolidating redundant operations and cutting costs.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | January 17, 1991
Even though it was painful, USF&G Corp.'s decision to terminate 900 workers yesterday was necessary to make the troubled insurance company competitive, according to stock analysts who follow USF&G."
BUSINESS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | February 7, 2007
Allstate Corp. and other insurers could be forced to write homeowner policies throughout Maryland, including coastal areas where some companies have pulled out, under legislation being drafted in the General Assembly. Del. David D. Rudolph, vice chairman of the House Economic Matters Committee, said yesterday that he plans to introduce the bill but that specific language has yet to be worked out. Rudolph said he is responding in part to Allstate's announcement in December that it would stop writing new homeowner policies in the state's coastal areas.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 21, 1998
NEW YORK -- Travelers Group Inc., the No. 2 U.S. financial services company, said yesterday that its first-quarter earnings rose a bigger-than-expected 25 percent, led by gains in its Salomon Smith Barney Inc. securities unit.Travelers, which agreed two weeks ago to a $70 billion merger with Citicorp to form the world's biggest financial company, said profit excluding gains from investment sales rose to a record $1.01 billion, or 84 cents a diluted share, from $806.2 million, or 66 cents, a year ago.Profit exceeded the 76 cents that analysts expected, according to First Call Corp.
NEWS
January 29, 1997
Robert D. Kilpatrick,72, who helped form Cigna Corp. and build it into one of the nation's largest insurance companies, died of bone marrow cancer Monday in Richmond, Va.As president and chief executive officer of the insurance company Connecticut General, he played a leading role in bringing about a merger with INA Corp. in 1982 that formed Cigna. Under Mr. Kilpatrick's leadership, Cigna became a major commercial and casualty insurance company, and developed the base that would later allow it to become prominent in the business of health maintenance organizations.
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