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NEWS
August 7, 2014
Your recent report on the conflict in Gaza alternately misstates the facts, omits them or misrepresents them ("Israel continues Gaza strikes," Aug. 3). Your statement that the fighting broke out on July 8 with Israeli airstrikes would lead the uninformed reader to believe that Israel started this war, when in fact the Israeli action was a delayed response to increasing rocket fire from Gaza that began weeks earlier. You printed a photograph lamenting the loss of the Omari mosque without noting that Hamas has habitually used schools, mosques, hospitals and even cemeteries as bases from which to launch rocket attacks.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 12, 2014
I notice that, in this most recent conflict between Israel and Hamas, there are widespread calls for Israel to "limit civilian casualties. " President Barack Obama, U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon, and many other leaders of the free world repeat this over and over, without knowing exactly what they are asking for. They call for limits on civilian casualties? Israel has done more than any other nation in the history of the world to do so. They fire warning shots, give citizens ample time to evacuate and call cell phones in advance!
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2011
An email was forwarded to me announcing Wednesday night's reopening of Kaufman's Tavern in Gambrills. I gave Kaufmann's a call, and manager Daniel Carr confirmed that the sprawling restaurant would be open on Wednesday, Aug. 31, the first night since Hurricane Irene came through town and knocked Kaufmann's for a loop. Irene did a number on Kaufmann's, smashing a tree down on a car its lot and generally playing havoc with the expansive deck area that had been remodeled only this past spring.
NEWS
August 7, 2014
Your recent report on the conflict in Gaza alternately misstates the facts, omits them or misrepresents them ("Israel continues Gaza strikes," Aug. 3). Your statement that the fighting broke out on July 8 with Israeli airstrikes would lead the uninformed reader to believe that Israel started this war, when in fact the Israeli action was a delayed response to increasing rocket fire from Gaza that began weeks earlier. You printed a photograph lamenting the loss of the Omari mosque without noting that Hamas has habitually used schools, mosques, hospitals and even cemeteries as bases from which to launch rocket attacks.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2012
Hot weather contributed to the death of a 13th Baltimore resident earlier this summer, state health officials confirmed Tuesday. The city man, who was between the ages of 45 and 64, brings to 42 the number of heat-related deaths in the state so far this summer, the deadliest since 2005, when heat was a factor in 47 deaths across the state. The fatality was included in a weekly update on heat-related health concerns the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene released late Tuesday.
SPORTS
January 29, 1992
A fight broke ou between center James Donaldson and guard Rolando Blackman during a Dallas Mavericks' scrimmage yesterday, but the chief casualty was guard Derek Harper.Harper left practice with two fresh scratches under his eye. He received the wounds trying to break up the skirmish.Donaldson said the scrap boiled out of the frustration of the Mavericks' losing 13 of their last 14 games.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 2, 2004
WASHINGTON - We used to know them by name. Maybe you remember. American soldiers were fighting in Afghanistan and every time one died, we learned his name. Not only that, reporters told us about his life, introduced us to his newly bereft widow and suddenly fatherless children. Made us feel the weight of that death. You had to know it couldn't last. Had to know that, as the casualty count mounted, it would become impossible to know the dead as individual men and women. At some point, they would become "casualties" in much the same way raindrops become a thunderstorm.
NEWS
By Warren Vieth and Warren Vieth,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 13, 2005
CRAWFORD, Texas - President Bush passed within 100 feet today of the roadside encampment where the mother of an Iraq war casualty was inviting him to stop and talk, but his motorcade passed by the protest site without making contact. The fleeting encounter between the president's entourage and the anti-war assembly organized by Cindy Sheehan occurred near Bush's Prairie Chapel Ranch, where he and first lady Laura Bush are spending a five-week summer vacation. On their way to a Republican fundraising event at a neighbor's ranch about three miles away, the Bushes passed directly by Camp Casey - the tent camp named after Sheehan's son, a 24-year-old Army mechanic who was killed in action in Iraq.
NEWS
January 12, 2001
THE JOINT Korean-U.S. investigation into the 1950 No Gun Ri incident at least concluded that it happened. That vindicates the Korean survivors who always said that civilian refugees fleeing toward U.S. lines had been shot and strafed under a bridge by U.S. troops. It reverses years of U.S. denials that such an atrocity had occurred and validates the Pulitzer Prize-winning 1999 Associated Press report supporting survivor accounts. The joint statement said the U.S. troops were undertrained and new to combat, commanded by leaders with limited experience, unprepared for North Korean weapons and tactics, and "legitimately fearful of the possible infiltration of North Korean soldiers who routinely entered American lines in groups disguised as civilians in refugee columns."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 21, 2007
BAGHDAD -- Six American soldiers and their interpreter were killed by a roadside bomb in western Baghdad on Saturday, the military said yesterday, in one of the deadliest single attacks against American troops in the capital in recent months. The soldiers, whose names were not released, had been searching for insurgent arms caches, the military said in a statement. A soldier assigned to the Army's 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), a supply unit, was killed Saturday when a bomb struck his armored vehicle near Diwaniya, south of Baghdad, the military said.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2014
The voice of the water taxi operator off Canton came over the radio Wednesday morning. "We're taking on water," he said. "I think sinking or capsizing is imminent. " Emergency responders listening to their radios at a nearby pier immediately shifted into gear, readying themselves for the start of a mock exercise rescuing dozens of overboard victims in the Inner Harbor. The energy was apparent, if somewhat awkward. "You want to try to do good on these things," said Skip Minter, a longtime boat pilot for the Baltimore Fire Department, whose job was to maneuver out to the training scene — dozens of life jackets strewn about in the water — and return the "victims" back to shore.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | February 28, 2014
In the already tiresome guessing game of whether or not Hillary Clinton will run for president in 2016, there's a wide assumption among Democrats that the nomination is hers for the asking. One apparent rationale is that the party has no one else to turn to who has comparable national recognition or appeal. The assumption is somewhat predicated on an expectation that Vice President Joe Biden would step aside, either out of a conviction that he could not beat her in primary competition or that his public image is so tattered as to render his nomination inconceivable.
NEWS
By Craig R. Wonson | February 2, 2014
Two recent incidents in Afghanistan resulted in the deaths of more than 30 civilians. The first was a U.S. airstrike in support of Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF) in Parwan Province, the second a Taliban suicide attack on a popular restaurant in Kabul. The circumstances surrounding these two incidents were significantly different. The airstrike was reportedly conducted in-extremis to help save the lives of Afghan and U.S. forces trapped by heavy Taliban fire. In contrast, the Taliban attack on the restaurant was designed to kill as many civilians as possible.
NEWS
By Rebecca A. Adelman | January 2, 2014
In three weeks, representatives from the Assad regime and the opposition are scheduled to convene in Geneva to begin the process of negotiating peace in Syria's civil war - five months after the government's chemical weapons attacks killed more than 1,400 people. The atrocities were depicted in a series of casualty photographs and videos that circulated globally on news and social media, and they provoked the threat of military action against the Assad government by the United States.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2013
John A. Kinnaird backed his truck-mounted crane toward the monument that has stood at the side of Dundalk Avenue for two decades, a black-granite tribute "in memory of those who made the supreme sacrifice. " The memorial recognizes workers killed in industrial accidents at the Sparrows Point steel mill - more than 100 in the past 65 years, and countless more before that. But now the mill itself is dead, shut down last year. The United Steelworkers Local 9477 union, whose hall stands directly behind the monument, is following suit.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2013
Scientists believe a virus similar to measles in humans is responsible for an accelerating die-off in bottlenose dolphins along the Mid-Atlantic coast. Since July 1, 333 dead dolphins have washed ashore from North Carolina to New York, 10 times normal levels. In Maryland, 18 have been found dead since July 1, with most of those in the past few weeks. The virus could remain a threat to the dolphin population through next spring, the scientists said. The most promising theory is that the dolphin population gradually lost resistance to the disease, known as morbillivirus, since it caused a similar epidemic in the late 1980s.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 17, 2001
Ever since the last American soldier departed from the rooftops of Saigon more than 26 years ago, politicians and generals have doubted the nation's willingness to stomach military casualties. Call it post-Vietnam syndrome, or "casualty aversion" -- it has contributed to hastened withdrawals in operations ranging from the victory in the Persian Gulf war to the aborted relief mission to Somalia. For the moment, such timidity lies buried in the ruins of lower Manhattan and the Pentagon.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2003
Beyond the issue of whether or when they achieve their goals in this war, U.S. commanders in Iraq will also be measured by a very human, and constantly changing, scorecard - the number of dead and wounded. Defense Department statistics show that casualty rates were remarkably steady for much of the 20th century but dropped sharply in the nation's most recent conflicts. In World War I about one in 15 U.S. troops was killed or wounded; in World War II it was one in 14. The rate climbed to one in 12 in Korea and fell back to one in 16 during Vietnam.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | July 3, 2013
Like millions of Americans, Dr. Ryan Katz plans to celebrate the Fourth of July at a barbecue with his family in Canton. The only difference is that Katz, an attending hand surgeon at Union Memorial Hospital's renowned Curtis National Hand Center, knows not to stray too far from home. Katz, 39, is scheduled to be on call July 4-5, when people will be most at risk for fireworks-related injuries to hands, fingers and thumbs and upper extremities. "I'll be local," he said. "I definitely see lots of fireworks injuries.
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
Bob Marshall was on the phone in his office at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center in East Baltimore when he heard the boom, felt the building shake and saw the plume of smoke on the horizon. "This is what we've trained for," he thought. As news poured in that a train had derailed and caused a large explosion less than two miles away in Rosedale, Marshall, the hospital's emergency services administrator, began rapidly putting together an incident command center to deal with a potential influx of casualties.
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