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By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,Sun Staff Writer | August 13, 1995
The signs are unmistakable. Hush Puppies, those rubber-soled, suede pigskin shoes that are almost too comfortable to wear without pangs of guilt, are treading with greater frequency in corporate boardrooms.Starched white button-down Oxfords are no longer the law of the land at IBM, that former bastion of automated formality.And retired priest Frederick J. Hanna of Baltimore can't even find a seersucker suit anymore.What's the world coming to?To the dismay of the stiff-upper-lip crowd, it's called casual wear.
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NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | November 29, 2006
Teri Abrahams and Julie Knolmayer had been taking tennis lessons for about a year and were ready to trade in their sweats for a more stylish look on the courts. So they turned to Sport Styles, a boutique in Glenwood selling exercise clothes and other chic clothing. During a recent visit, the two Montgomery County women, still flushed from a tennis lesson at the nearby Triumph Health and Fitness Center, browsed and tried on, but they didn't buy. Instead, they told owner Elaine Smart-Hoffman what they liked, and their sizes.
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FEATURES
By Vida Roberts | May 2, 1993
As spring days turn balmy, dress codes relax and the line between business attire and casual wear becomes less rigidly defined. Dressing down can be as easy as shedding tie and socks, because the newest jackets wear as comfortably as a favorite shirt. The coolest way to go is with layers of light, natural fabrics -- such as seersucker -- that can change with a mood or unpredictable temperatures. Could anything be easier?
ENTERTAINMENT
By MARC SHAPIRO | June 29, 2006
Filene Center at Wolf Trap Drive a bit west of Washington, and have a picnic on the lawn while enjoying live music. Where --1551 Trap Road, Vienna, Va. Call --703-255-1900 Web site --wolftrap.org Notable --The stage is visible from almost all lawn spots, and patrons may bring refreshments. Because of decibel restrictions, the music won't leave your ears ringing long after the show. Vibe --Warm and welcoming. What to wear --Let the weather guide your outfit choices. Casual wear will do just fine.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MARC SHAPIRO | June 29, 2006
Filene Center at Wolf Trap Drive a bit west of Washington, and have a picnic on the lawn while enjoying live music. Where --1551 Trap Road, Vienna, Va. Call --703-255-1900 Web site --wolftrap.org Notable --The stage is visible from almost all lawn spots, and patrons may bring refreshments. Because of decibel restrictions, the music won't leave your ears ringing long after the show. Vibe --Warm and welcoming. What to wear --Let the weather guide your outfit choices. Casual wear will do just fine.
BUSINESS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,Sun Staff Writer | June 10, 1995
Jos. A. Bank Clothiers, hemmed in by poor sales and the expense of phasing out its line of women's wear, reported yesterday a $4.2 million loss for its latest reporting period.But company officials are looking ahead: Next week, they plan to unveil a new line of men's casual clothing that they hope will reinvigorate and refocus the company.In the three months that ended April 29, though, the bad news was widespread.Aside from the women's division, Chairman and Chief Executive Timothy F. Finley said, Bank was hurt by soft sales in men's clothing in February and March, weaker catalog sales because of increased postage and paper costs and a sluggish performance at new stores -- over 20 opened in the past 18 months.
BUSINESS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,Sun Staff Writer | June 15, 1995
Shareholders knew it. The CEO knew it. Results weren't good.So a soft-spoken Timothy F. Finley stood before his investors yesterday and quipped: "In terms of arrogance, if I have any left, it's been warped by the humility I've enjoyed in the last 18 months."So it went for the chairman and chief executive officer of Jos. A. Bank Clothiers at a somber annual stockholders meeting overshadowed by the company's poor sales, falling stock price and financial losses."What are the reasons the stock has dropped?"
TOPIC
By Kim Grizzard | April 1, 2001
GREENVILLE, N.C. - For Doris Ballengee, "Just As I Am" is more than a hymn. It's a fashion statement. The words describe the dress code of sorts at the Salvation Army, where worshippers come wearing everything from suits and dresses to jeans and T-shirts. "We allow them to wear anything," said Ballengee, who attended Presbyterian churches for 60 of her 79 years before joining the Salvation Army. "They're there because they want to honor God. God isn't interested in what they're wearing."
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2001
Men's apparel retailer Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc. posted its best quarter ever yesterday as it reported earnings in its fourth quarter rose 33 percent to a record $2.9 million, or 48 cents per diluted share. The numbers for the three months that ended Feb. 3 were up from $2.5 million, or 36 cents per diluted share, before one-time charges for the last three months of fiscal 1999. The Hampstead-based chain had said it expected an earnings increase of at least 25 percent. The improvement was attributed to increased sales and tighter controls on expenses.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff Writer | December 1, 1994
Reacting to poor quarterly earnings and the fact that Americans don't wear suits like they used to, Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc. said yesterday that it will aggressively boost its offering of sport coats, khaki slacks and other more-casual "careerwear."In a strategic switch that amounts to more than an alteration but less than an overhaul, the Hampstead-based suit-maker also said it will open fewer stores than planned next year and devote more resources to catalog sales."There is a growing trend toward casual wear in the business," said Timothy F. Finley, Bank's chairman and chief executive officer.
NEWS
By KARLAYNE R. PARKER and KARLAYNE R. PARKER,UNISUN EDITOR | April 2, 2006
Women love men who know how to dress well. Here in Baltimore, men seem to have a style of their own. Their athletic wear, casual wear and business attire have a certain look. I would call it urban freestyle with a hint of color. And it's good to see a man who can be what I call homeboy chic one day - comfortable in jeans, a designer shirt and Timberlands - and ready for the office the next day - in a tie, suit and shoes that are trendy but classic. As the saying goes, what you wear can become your style, your calling card or trademark.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2005
Start saying your goodbyes now, menfolk. The era of the T-shirt is dwindling. Oh, you can still wash the car in your T, mow the lawn in it, play a little basketball in it. But for most other casual events, the polo shirt has trumped your trusted T. That's right. The polo. You remember it from the 1980s preppy craze. Short-sleeved, two buttons. Tidy little collar. After seasons and seasons of T-shirts - rumpled, oversized or emblazoned with irreverent sayings - the polo has returned, taking men's fashion one step further into Grownupville.
NEWS
By Helen B. Jones and Helen B. Jones,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2005
For some folks, being fashionable is as easy as breathing. They have an innate knack for putting together clothes and accessories that turn our heads and dazzle our eyes. Whether they're in casual wear, business attire or evening togs, they always make a fashion statement. If only we knew their secrets ... Well, we found four local sharp dressers and got them to tell us how they got so fashion-forward, to give up the names of their favorite stores, to reveal where they got that great bargain and more.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | June 9, 2002
On a recent sweltering day, Charella Marx donned a smart red dress and matching sandals for work. Sure, it was a mid-week workday, but the thought of squeezing into pantyhose? It didn't even cross her mind. "It's plain hot, and it's just another layer of clothing that you have to put on," Marx, a 55-year-old Edgewater real estate agent, said while shopping at Nordstrom in Annapolis on her lunch break. "Once it gets hot, I don't wear them. Even in air-conditioning it's uncomfortable. I don't see any redeeming social value in pantyhose."
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,Sun Staff | February 3, 2002
Admit it -- if you could get away with it, you'd be wearing pajamas 24 / 7. Pjs are comfortable, familiar and, nowadays, an extension of a person's fashion sense. They don't have to be ratty threads, not with the boom in so-called novelty pajamas that combine whimsical patterns with all the practical aspects of something that's on your body a third of the day (if you're lucky). "Women care about what they put on at home. They want to be in pajamas, which are big now," says Mindi Leikin, co-owner of Bare Necessities, an intimate apparel boutique in Greenspring Station.
TOPIC
By Kim Grizzard | April 1, 2001
GREENVILLE, N.C. - For Doris Ballengee, "Just As I Am" is more than a hymn. It's a fashion statement. The words describe the dress code of sorts at the Salvation Army, where worshippers come wearing everything from suits and dresses to jeans and T-shirts. "We allow them to wear anything," said Ballengee, who attended Presbyterian churches for 60 of her 79 years before joining the Salvation Army. "They're there because they want to honor God. God isn't interested in what they're wearing."
FEATURES
By Elsa Klensch and Elsa Klensch,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | October 12, 1995
I am a 20-year-old student with very broad hips and a big bottom, but the rest of my body is quite skinny. My problem is that I look dreadful in pants. For years I have resigned myself to wearing skirts or dresses, and if I had to wear long pants, I'd wear an oversized long blouse.Now I want a new look. What can you suggest?For advice I turned to Jennifer George, who is very savvy about women with figure problems.First, she recommends wearing black or navy, because dark colors are minimizing.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2001
Men's apparel retailer Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc. posted its best quarter ever yesterday as it reported earnings in its fourth quarter rose 33 percent to a record $2.9 million, or 48 cents per diluted share. The numbers for the three months that ended Feb. 3 were up from $2.5 million, or 36 cents per diluted share, before one-time charges for the last three months of fiscal 1999. The Hampstead-based chain had said it expected an earnings increase of at least 25 percent. The improvement was attributed to increased sales and tighter controls on expenses.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2001
Most retailers would just as soon forget Holiday 2000. Not Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc. In between selling camel hair blazers and lamb's wool sport coats, managers and salesmen at Bank's 117 stores pulled out lists of names sent by corporate headquarters, got on the phone and alerted customers to apparel that was in stock, in their size and on sale. In two months, the stores called 200,000 people. While other national chains missed December sales goals, Hampstead-based Bank set records.
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