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By John C. Bersia | January 31, 2007
ORLANDO, Fla. -- Would a "perfect storm" help resolve the tedious Fidel Castro illness-and-succession saga gripping Cuba? At a recent forum on the island's future, specialists suggested that - contrary to some hopes after the Cuban dictator first took ill - essentially no possibility presently exists for a post-Castro collapse. That is, unless a perfect storm develops. Now, I have to admit that I would be very pleased if Mr. Castro would wither away and a freer Cuba would emerge. For too long, the island's people have been denied self-determination and subjected to the whims of a crusty communist who refuses to accept that the "best" days of his movement and philosophy lie behind him. But so many questions swirled around Mr. Castro's health crisis at its onset that it was impossible to determine if he was actually indisposed.
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NEWS
By Mark Silva and Mark Silva,Tribune Washington Bureau | April 14, 2009
WASHINGTON -President Barack Obama is permitting unlimited travel and transfer of money by Cuban-Americans to their relatives in Cuba and sponsoring greater telecommunications with the island, while keeping a long-standing U.S. embargo against trade with Cuba in place. The State, Treasury and Commerce departments will lift "all restrictions" on the visits of family members to Cuba and remittances of money, White House press secretary Robert Gibbs said Monday. This "series of steps ... to reach out to the Cuban people" is intended to "help bridge the gap between divided Cuban families," Gibbs said, and in turn promote greater freedom and human rights in the communist nation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Linda Kleindienst and Linda Kleindienst,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | September 4, 2003
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -- Born in the Soviet Union, Katia Tchourioukanova was raised on the romantic ideas of communism and the Cuban Revolution. Now, at age 30, she is helping to tell the story of 75 political dissidents who were arrested, convicted and imprisoned by the Cuban government last spring as Fidel Castro launched one of his toughest crackdowns on critics. "No ideas should sacrifice basic human rights," said the mother of three, who came to the United States six years ago and is studying to become a special education teacher.
NEWS
By John C. Bersia | January 31, 2007
ORLANDO, Fla. -- Would a "perfect storm" help resolve the tedious Fidel Castro illness-and-succession saga gripping Cuba? At a recent forum on the island's future, specialists suggested that - contrary to some hopes after the Cuban dictator first took ill - essentially no possibility presently exists for a post-Castro collapse. That is, unless a perfect storm develops. Now, I have to admit that I would be very pleased if Mr. Castro would wither away and a freer Cuba would emerge. For too long, the island's people have been denied self-determination and subjected to the whims of a crusty communist who refuses to accept that the "best" days of his movement and philosophy lie behind him. But so many questions swirled around Mr. Castro's health crisis at its onset that it was impossible to determine if he was actually indisposed.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 25, 2000
Given the current "All Elian, All the Time" universe, the Maryland Film Festival appears downright prescient, since it programmed three films this year having to do with Cuba. One, "La Esquina Caliente," looks back to last year when the Baltimore Orioles and the Cuban National Team played historic games at each other's home stadiums. Another, "This Is Cuba," is Chris Hume's critical look at the Castro regime, in which he interviews several Cuban citizens in rare, uncensored conversations.
NEWS
March 1, 1996
WITH HELP FROM the likes of Fidel Castro and Pat Buchanan, American xenophobia is reaching fever pitch as the election year unfolds. Two current examples are the latest Cuba confrontation and the drive by this nation of immigrants to get tough on immigrants.Cuba: Because Mr. Castro sent his jets to shoot down two unarmed civilian aircraft, there is no stopping passage of a bill in Congress that tramples all over U.S. commitments in the field of international investment. President Clinton originally opposed this measure, which contravenes the very rules his administration is seeking in Paris negotiations.
NEWS
December 3, 1993
One measure of what's happening in Cuba is the relentless proclamation of moderating and liberalizing policies to dilute communism and reduce hostility with the United States. Fidel Castro's government has welcomed foreign investment, legitimized the holding of foreign currency by Cuban nationals and offered to negotiate reparations to Americans for properties confiscated in the 1960s.A second measure is the number of Cubans who flee their island at the slightest opportunity. Two air force pilots landed their MiGs at U.S. bases in September.
NEWS
October 29, 1993
It will be no surprise if President Jean-Bertrand Aristide does not return to Haiti tomorrow. It is not news that Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras, army commander and real ruler, has welshed on his promise of July 3 to step down tomorrow. If the popularly elected president returned to take power while the general held it, the president would probably be killed.General Cedras is defying the U.S. and the U.N. He is terrorizing the people of the country. He lied before and will probably lie again. He is no doubt inspired by General Mohamed Farah Aidid's defiance of the U.S. and the U.N. in Somalia.
NEWS
May 10, 1999
Embargo on Cuba hurts people, health, not Castro's regime The anti-Castro protesters who gathered at Camden Yards May 3 before the Orioles-Cuba game did not seem to acknowledge that one can oppose the U.S. embargo on trade with Cuba without being a supporter of the Castro regime. One can feel for those who have suffered since the revolution but object to inflicting further suffering through the embargo and related restrictive policies. For who, in fact, is the embargo hurting?
SPORTS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 5, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Cuba has agreed to an exhibition game in Havana on March 28 between a Cuban national team and the Orioles, according to sources close to the discussions.But no deal has been struck yet on a second game at Camden Yards in early April, and some sources cautioned that the whole package might still fall apart.The Orioles were reported to be pleased with Cuba's agreement to one game, but still want to schedule the second game in Baltimore.The progress on at least one game was reported yesterday by several sources in Washington and Baltimore, including a government official, as time was running out to schedule the exhibition games before Opening Day, April 5.The complicated negotiations require agreement from not only the Orioles and the Cuban government, but also Major League Baseball, the players' union and the Clinton administration, which must approve a license for the Orioles to travel to Cuba.
NEWS
By THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS | January 24, 2005
HAVANA - As George W. Bush begins his second term calling for an end to tyranny, Cuban officials are bracing for four more years of bruising economic sanctions from an American president they call "The Emperor." "For more than 40 years, all we've gotten from the United States is hostility and aggression," said Miguel Alvarez, an official with the National Assembly, Cuba's lawmaking body. "U.S. officials don't believe that their victory in the Cold War will be complete without the fall of the Cuban government."
TOPIC
By G. Jefferson Price III and G. Jefferson Price III,PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | July 11, 2004
Recently, I heard that John Kerry is described by associates in Congress as a ponderer and a panderer, both presumably bad things. But only one is bad. What America needs is a president who spends a little more time pondering the issues and crises facing the nation and the world, instead of running us headlong into disaster. Panderer is certainly a harsh insult. But on some issues it applies to practically every American politician who seeks the presidency or even lesser political office.
NEWS
By Stephen Johnson | July 7, 2004
WASHINGTON -- While immigration reform is the acknowledged "third rail" of American politics -- touch it and you immediately anger some constituency -- U.S. policy toward Cuba comes a close second. There are two distinct arguments on how to treat this pesky dictatorship 90 miles from our coast, and proponents of either position pillory anyone who deviates. Hence the Bush administration has gotten a drubbing from traditional supporters in the Cuban-American community and from anti-embargo advocates for suggesting more nuanced, targeted sanctions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Linda Kleindienst and Linda Kleindienst,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | September 4, 2003
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -- Born in the Soviet Union, Katia Tchourioukanova was raised on the romantic ideas of communism and the Cuban Revolution. Now, at age 30, she is helping to tell the story of 75 political dissidents who were arrested, convicted and imprisoned by the Cuban government last spring as Fidel Castro launched one of his toughest crackdowns on critics. "No ideas should sacrifice basic human rights," said the mother of three, who came to the United States six years ago and is studying to become a special education teacher.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | April 11, 2003
WASHINGTON - I admit it. I've committed the same crime that Raul Rivero has allegedly committed. I have criticized the Cuban government. I have done it in print, too. But hardly anyone in Cuba read it, except perhaps the state police. Political literature that criticizes Fidel Castro is technically illegal. A lot of things are technically illegal in Cuba. In countries like Cuba, the safest word for you to remember is, "Don't!" Nor was anyone in Cuba legally allowed to read Mr. Rivero's critiques of the regime.
NEWS
January 12, 2002
Instead of open trade, help Cubans throw off failed Castro regime In his argument for the unilateral lifting of U.S. economic sanctions against the Castro regime, Brian Alexander grossly misjudges the economic opportunities for U.S. businesses in Cuba ("Lift restrictions on trade with Cuba," Opinion Commentary, Jan. 2). The same International Trade Commission report he cites concludes that, in the absence of sanctions, U.S. exports to Cuba would be "less than 0.5 percent of total U.S. exports."
NEWS
August 24, 1994
Want to know the cruelest action the United States could take against the Cuban rafters? Withdraw the two-dozen Navy and Coast Guard ships on patrol in the Florida Straits and let the sharks have at them! That would slow the exodus, and quick. According to some reports, such an approach actually was broached at the White House last week before President Clinton decided on the far more humane course of taking thousands of asylum-seekers to Guantanamo for safe-keeping as the Cuban crisis moves in unpredictable ways.
NEWS
June 10, 1995
Cuba's detention of accused swindler and cocaine trafficker Robert Vesco as a possible prelude to extraditing him to the United States raises intriguing questions about relations between Washington and Havana. For the Castro regime to consider such a move is an unmistakable bid for reconciliation, especially since it comes after the Clinton administration's decision to send would-be Cuban refugees back to their homeland rather than accept them as legal immigrants.If Vesco returns, he will bring with him a life story so smacking of salable fiction that he has tried to give his children legal ownership of its details.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 25, 2000
Given the current "All Elian, All the Time" universe, the Maryland Film Festival appears downright prescient, since it programmed three films this year having to do with Cuba. One, "La Esquina Caliente," looks back to last year when the Baltimore Orioles and the Cuban National Team played historic games at each other's home stadiums. Another, "This Is Cuba," is Chris Hume's critical look at the Castro regime, in which he interviews several Cuban citizens in rare, uncensored conversations.
TOPIC
By Lauren Goodsmith | August 1, 1999
FOUR A.M. at Miami International Airport. I'm surrounded by people with enormous black duffel bags stuffed with clothing, gifts and medicines. Their carry-ons are filled with over-the-counter supplies: aspirin, Tylenol, Imodium and Citrucel.I'm on my way to Havana to take part in a public-health study tour organized by the Center for Cuban Studies in New York. Most of the other people on my flight are going to visit family members in "extreme humanitarian need," one of the few circumstances under which the U.S. government allows its citizens to travel to Cuba.
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