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By Brendan Walsh | January 15, 1993
ED Loring, a member of the Open Door Community in Atlanta, wrote a timely parable about a "rather large hippopotamus who occupied a rather large room."The citizens agreed never to mention this hippo and never call it by name, so while the creature grew larger each day, occupying more and more space, no one ever pointed to it, and no one ever named it.A prophetess warned the people that they had better name the hippo and then do something about its insatiable appetite. If they kept avoiding the obvious, she said, soon the hippopotamus would take over, crush every citizen and destroy the room.
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NEWS
By Brendan Walsh | January 15, 1993
ED Loring, a member of the Open Door Community in Atlanta, wrote a timely parable about a "rather large hippopotamus who occupied a rather large room."The citizens agreed never to mention this hippo and never call it by name, so while the creature grew larger each day, occupying more and more space, no one ever pointed to it, and no one ever named it.A prophetess warned the people that they had better name the hippo and then do something about its insatiable appetite. If they kept avoiding the obvious, she said, soon the hippopotamus would take over, crush every citizen and destroy the room.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 12, 1991
MEHRANA, India -- It was at the entrance to this little village of mud and brick, beside an ancient shrine to Lord Shiva the destroyer, that Mehrana's star-crossed young lovers ended their lives side-by-side last week.From a sturdy limb of Mehrana's holy banyan tree, Roshni, 16, and Bijendra, 20, were hanged just after 8 a.m. for all the village to see, a symbol of order, the elders had said, of tradition and of the village's izzat -- chastity and honor.The young woman, Roshni, was a high-caste Hindu, after all, one of the Jats who owned the land, the village and the power over the likes of Bijendra and his fellow Jatavs.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 12, 1991
MEHRANA, India -- It was at the entrance to this little village of mud and brick, beside an ancient shrine to Lord Shiva the destroyer, that Mehrana's star-crossed young lovers ended their lives side-by-side last week.From a sturdy limb of Mehrana's holy banyan tree, Roshni, 16, and Bijendra, 20, were hanged just after 8 a.m. for all the village to see, a symbol of order, the elders had said, of tradition and of the village's izzat -- chastity and honor.The young woman, Roshni, was a high-caste Hindu, after all, one of the Jats who owned the land, the village and the power over the likes of Bijendra and his fellow Jatavs.
NEWS
By JO-ANN PILARDI | June 7, 2006
The immigration debates always focus on small brown bodies jumping fences and scooting through the brush of our Southwestern states (land that was Mexico about 150 years ago). Our self-righteous anger at those brown bodies is fueled by our narrow use of the word "illegal" - a term reserved only for those immigrant workers. Yet aren't there other "illegals" hiding in the American underbrush, and isn't it time to add to the American immigration lexicon a new term? But where are those other "illegals" - the illegal employers of the illegal workers?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Weinberg and By Steve Weinberg,Special to the Sun | October 24, 1999
"The Big Test: The Secret History of the American Meritocracy," by Nicholas Lemann. Farrar, Strauss and Giroux. 368 pages. $27.Nicholas Lemann started out thinking he would probably write a history of the Educational Testing Service, the organization that markets the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) to prospective university students. Somehow, he persuaded the management at the secretive organization to open its archives to him. What he found turned out to be fascinating.But alert readers will note that the title of Lemann's new book says nothing specifically about the Educational Testing Service, and fails to mention the SAT by name.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | April 8, 2010
Here's something you won't hear much about in the coming Maryland gubernatorial election: The United States has the world's highest incarceration rate and a de facto racial caste system that discriminates against hundreds of thousands of black men in the way Jim Crow laws once did. You won't hear anything close to that from Martin O'Malley, the Democrat and present governor, nor from Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., the Republican and wannabe-governor-again who,...
NEWS
March 17, 1992
THE men's movement, symbolized by Robert Bly's best-selling book, "Iron John," may not be such a good thing for women, argued Jill Johnston in a recent issue of the New York Times Book Review:"Bly, like Jung before him, is caught up in the 'archetypes' of the masculine and the feminine. Men and women are defined by a given nature, fixed and unalterable, cast as opposites . . . in a system reflecting the political status quo . . . . Bly never grasped, it seems, the core concept of feminism, that the attributes of masculinity and feminity are cultural fabrications, rooted in a caste system in which one sex serves the other.
NEWS
By Henry Chu and Henry Chu,Los Angeles Times | November 4, 2007
BAIRAGHAR, India --Plenty of women might feel they deserve an award for marrying their husbands, but Madhavi Arwar is actually getting one - from the Indian government, no less. Not that her husband, Chandrashekhar, is a bad sort. In fact, he's good-looking, holds a steady job at an insurance company and dotes on their apple-cheeked son. But he is also a Dalit, or an "untouchable," the lowest of the low under India's ancient caste system. Madhavi is not, and for marrying "down" the social ladder, she is entitled to $250 in cash, plus a certificate of appreciation.
NEWS
August 11, 1997
INDIA'S new president, who was chosen for the ceremonial role by the country's lawmakers, is a seasoned diplomat, politician and cabinet minister.But K. R. Narayanan, former ambassador in Washington, is also an "untouchable," the lowest caste in the social hierarchy of traditional Hindu culture.India is a secular state, most of whose people are Hindus, which has long outlawed discrimination against low castes. But it still flourishes.Other societies exhibit the prejudices we know as racism without differences that can be called racial.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey | March 13, 2005
We live in a modern-day financial caste system. The goal is to become better than the next person and merit perks that the rabble can't enjoy. Take the airline industry. On one major airline, I am a "premier executive," a status attained simply by flying far too much. So I get to board the plane in group one, which confidently marches onto the plane before overhead bins fill up, pillows and blankets disappear, and passengers clog the aisles. Group one is an anxious bunch, its members jockeying for position as they await being called lest someone sneak in ahead of them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 22, 1992
"Encino Man" is really about Cro-Magnon Man but, alas, it feels as if it were written by Neanderthal man.Crude and loopy, it follows as a couple of L.A. teen-agers come across a cave man trapped in the ice, free him, and haul him off to Encino High, where, they believe, his coolness will rub off on them, and as he rises through the school's vicious caste system, so will they.One big problem: the movie can't really make up its own mind who its star is. Sean Astin is the nominal headliner, but he's not very interesting and his character is conceived in such rancid, greedy, shallow terms nobody cares about him. Pauly Shore, famous from MTV as a "veejay", is a likely candidate, but the script isn't really written to showcase him either, and he too frequently feels like a passerby.
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