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By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | November 2, 1994
Q: Why do the brand new cast iron skillets I see in the store look so different in color from my grandmother's?A: The shiny new metal in a cast iron skillet has not had the years of seasoning that darkens used skillets to an even black color. The new pan can be seasoned by first washing with soap, rinsing and drying. Then slowly melt a small amount shortening (preferably vegetable) in the pan. Using a soft cloth, rub the shortening thoroughly over the inside and outside of the pan. Lids should also be seasoned in this manner.
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NEWS
BALTIMORE SUN MEDIA GROUP | February 11, 2013
Bills that would allow a surcharge of up to $2 per month on residential natural gas bills to pay for new pipelines and other distribution system upgrades passed both houses of the Maryland General Assembly last week, as most Harford County legislators gave the bills their support. The exception was in the House of Delegates, where Harford Dels. Glen Glass and Pat McDonough were among 18 votes cast against HB-89, which received 119 yeas, including from Harford Dels. Mary-Dulany James, Susan McComas, Wayne Norman, Donna Stifler and Kathy Szeliga.
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NEWS
By SCOTT CARLSON and SCOTT CARLSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 15, 2006
The shelves in my kitchen are heavy with expensive new cookware like All-Clad, Calphalon and Le Creuset, but the most useful pan in the house wasn't purchased at a fancy kitchen store. Several years ago, I bought my antique cast-iron skillet -- caked in grime, with a little rust -- at a thrift shop in Hampden for $10. I knew that with some cleaning and careful seasoning, I would have a treasure on my hands. Griswold, a long-defunct Pennsylvania ironworks, made my skillet in the late 1800s, when Griswold's foundries were turning out high-quality cookware.
NEWS
By Kate Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2010
Despite weighing more than 100 pounds, manhole covers are worth less than $10 to Baltimore scrap metal dealers — if they are even willing to take them. Even so, the city discovered 17 of them missing Tuesday in Baltimore's largest manhole-cover theft in four years, the Department of Public Works said. Kurt Kocher, the department's spokesman, suspected that whoever took them was looking to sell them as scrap. "What else could you do with it?" Kocher said. The cast-iron covers were stolen from patches of grass on East Lombard Street near an industrial area.
FEATURES
By Annie Linskey | December 24, 2003
Editor's note: Today, Merry Xcess says farewell for the season. You can find all 12 of our odd yet true shopping tips online at www.Sunspot.net. Search for "Merry Xcess." Hey, there's still one shopping day left! Happy holidays. It may seem peculiar, but nothing can offer a warmer welcome to your holiday guests than cold cast iron. At least, according to Connecticut's White Flower Farm, as it offers a new 20-pound cast-iron doormat. Old-fashioned types might think cast iron only belongs in the kitchen.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun architecture critic | May 18, 2008
A rare example of Baltimore's architectural history was nearly lost several years ago when an 1871 firehouse on West Mulberry Street was torn down to make way for redevelopment. It was the only firehouse in Baltimore -- and one of the last surviving buildings in the city -- whose first-floor front facade was made of cast iron, a popular local building material in the 1800s, but not in use today. A quick thinking preservationist saw the demolition work under way and managed to salvage the largest cast-iron pieces before they were carted off for scrap metal.
NEWS
By Milwaukee Journal Sentinel | December 2, 2001
Mara Reid Rogers, author of "Cooking in Cast Iron," gives these tips on how to care for cast-iron cookware. She says although these pieces need little care other than seasoning, cooks who are not familiar with the process may believe that it is a difficult and / or time consuming task. Seasoning. "All new cast-iron cookware must be seasoned prior to use. And periodically, you may want to re-season it. First, peel off and discard any labels. Wash thoroughly with mild dishwashing liquid, rinse with hot water and dry thoroughly with a kitchen towel.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | November 10, 1996
THE BIGGIST headache in remodeling a bathroom -- literally and figuratively -- is the tub.It's a big brute of a thing that may be quaint (claw feet), ugly (no charm, no feet) or merely outdated (pink). But whatever it is now, it was installed to stay.Randy and a client have been wrestling with the problem in a bath remodel: Do you keep the old tub, if you sort of like it, or do you replace it? And what about having it recoated -- is that effective?By coincidence, an e-mail correspondent from Ellicott City dealing with the same issues wrote for advice:"I'm about to remodel our bathroom, doing all the work myself.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 2, 1992
Theatre Project presents satires on modern life"Stealth!!!," a one-woman show by New York experimental theater artist Margo Lee Sherman, opens Wednesday at the Theatre Project, 45 W. Preston St. A satirical double bill, the evening begins with the title work, in which Sherman utilizes three stuffed dummies to tell the story of four modern New Yorkers. In the second half, "If Your Husband Wants a Dog," Sherman presents a biting analysis of marriage and gender wars.A founding member of Bread & Puppet Theater, Sherman has created 18 solo performance pieces that have been performed widely in Europe as well as New York.
NEWS
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | October 8, 2000
Kitchen color is back -- in cabinets, cookware, appliances and surfaces. Those who remember a frightening experience with an avocado fridge, a harvest gold dishwasher or a pretty-in-pink sink -- don't run away screaming. This time, fashion, not engineering, is driving the color. This time the colors are subtle or bright neutrals that invite mixing and matching, and lend themselves to an endless array of decorating styles. No one ever made a bilious green refrigerator disappear in a design scheme, but today's colors, drawn from the subtler earth tones, are meant to be at ease in their settings.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun architecture critic | May 18, 2008
A rare example of Baltimore's architectural history was nearly lost several years ago when an 1871 firehouse on West Mulberry Street was torn down to make way for redevelopment. It was the only firehouse in Baltimore -- and one of the last surviving buildings in the city -- whose first-floor front facade was made of cast iron, a popular local building material in the 1800s, but not in use today. A quick thinking preservationist saw the demolition work under way and managed to salvage the largest cast-iron pieces before they were carted off for scrap metal.
NEWS
By SCOTT CARLSON and SCOTT CARLSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 15, 2006
The shelves in my kitchen are heavy with expensive new cookware like All-Clad, Calphalon and Le Creuset, but the most useful pan in the house wasn't purchased at a fancy kitchen store. Several years ago, I bought my antique cast-iron skillet -- caked in grime, with a little rust -- at a thrift shop in Hampden for $10. I knew that with some cleaning and careful seasoning, I would have a treasure on my hands. Griswold, a long-defunct Pennsylvania ironworks, made my skillet in the late 1800s, when Griswold's foundries were turning out high-quality cookware.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 28, 2005
I DON'T HAVE the bank account of Bill Gates or the art collection of Alice Walton, but I am rich with radiators. I have them in spades, or I should say in cast iron. In addition to the radiators that heat every floor of our four-story rowhouse, I also have a few extras, unattached hot-water radiators. I have kept them in my basement in the belief that you never know when you might need a spare, three-quarter-century-old piece of cast iron. I started collecting radiators about 10 years ago, when a new baseboard unit replaced a standing bathroom radiator.
FEATURES
By Annie Linskey | December 24, 2003
Editor's note: Today, Merry Xcess says farewell for the season. You can find all 12 of our odd yet true shopping tips online at www.Sunspot.net. Search for "Merry Xcess." Hey, there's still one shopping day left! Happy holidays. It may seem peculiar, but nothing can offer a warmer welcome to your holiday guests than cold cast iron. At least, according to Connecticut's White Flower Farm, as it offers a new 20-pound cast-iron doormat. Old-fashioned types might think cast iron only belongs in the kitchen.
NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2003
With both ends of the Howard Street Tunnel blocked by thick, blinding smoke from an underground train derailment two years ago, a downtown manhole became firefighters' most direct access to the burning rail cars. That day - July 18, 2001 - was one of the city's greatest emergencies, and now a new, specially designed cast-iron cover for the manhole at Howard and Lombard streets, to be dedicated at 3 p.m. today, will ensure that it is remembered. "I think for a long time people will remember that event," Mayor Martin O'Malley said yesterday.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan and Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | July 13, 2003
I just bought a cast-iron skillet, and everyone says I need to season it before I use it. what does that mean?, believe it or not, when you "season" a skillet, it has nothing to do with salt and pepper or even garlic powder. and it also doesn't mean that you keep it in the attic and bring it down during skillet season, or take it out for practice until it becomes a seasoned player. No, seasoning a cast-iron skillet means getting it ready to spend its lifetime as a great cooking tool. It's a technique that smoothes out the microscopic roughness on the surface of a new pan. There are a lot of opinions about the proper way to season a new cast-iron skillet, so I'm just going to narrow it down to the best one -- mine.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen | October 18, 1992
New dealers and specialty auctions harvesting vintage garden ornaments are raking it in all year long, and, surprisingly, much of the business is done in the heart of New York City and its environs. The topiaries of the English gentry, Grecian urns, woodland nymphs, Roman columns, elaborate benches, architectural bird baths, pedestal sundials, and menageries of carved fanciful beasts are landing in American houses and gardens. The prospects are so strong for weathered cast iron and stone furnishings and creatures that plastic pink flamingos face extinction and leaden jockeys are a dying breed.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 28, 2005
I DON'T HAVE the bank account of Bill Gates or the art collection of Alice Walton, but I am rich with radiators. I have them in spades, or I should say in cast iron. In addition to the radiators that heat every floor of our four-story rowhouse, I also have a few extras, unattached hot-water radiators. I have kept them in my basement in the belief that you never know when you might need a spare, three-quarter-century-old piece of cast iron. I started collecting radiators about 10 years ago, when a new baseboard unit replaced a standing bathroom radiator.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2003
A French, cast-iron cannon thought to date from 200 years ago -- during the Napoleonic Wars -- was presented to the Maryland Historical Trust yesterday by the Baltimore marine contracting company that recently discovered it under the water off Fells Point. The cannon was raised late last month by workers doing bulkhead restoration for the Fells Landing project near Bond and Caroline streets. "It's the first time I've physically seen a French cannon with a fleur-de-lis from that era before," said Scott S. Sheads, a National Park Service historic weapons officer based at Fort McHenry.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,SUN COLUMNIST | April 13, 2003
Fountains, statuary, columns, and ornate settees once graced only the lawns and gardens of the rich and famous. The rest of us were consigned to the nondescript birdbath or the plain-Jane terra-cotta pot. But no more. The knowledge and sophistication of the weekend gardener has grown, and so has the appetite for ornamentation. Gardeners have moved far beyond the little cement bunny rabbit or the "Mom's Garden" tablet. Manufacturers and retail garden centers have responded with water features, furniture, sculpture and containers that are just the right size, price -- and weight -- for the suburban gardener.
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