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By Luke Broadwater | May 7, 2011
Everyone knows there will be a movie made about the death of Osama bin Laden. But who will play whom? Conan O'Brien has the answers:  (Spoiler alert: Joe Biden will be played by Bob Barker.)   
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
After winning five Washington Area Theatre Community Honors awards and a Ruby Griffith Award for production excellence last season, the 2nd Star theater troupe is opening its 20th season with a production of Stephen Schwartz's biblical musical "Children of Eden. " Although its January 1991 London premiere received mixed reviews and closed after three months, "Children of Eden," with book and libretto by John Caird, has become such a popular offering in community theater circles that its initial struggles are a faded memory.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2012
Cast members from 1993's "A Bronx Tale" will reunite with Chazz Palminteri at Chazz: A Bronx Original on Monday night for a special fundraising happy hour. "A Bronx Tale" was the movie adaptation of Palminteri's one-man stage show of the same name. Almost 20 years later, Palminteri's love affair with his native borough would in part inspire the Inner Harbor restaurant that bears his name. Guests at Monday's happy hour will meet cast members from the movie, along with other Baltimore celebrities and sports figures who are helping the restaurant launch a new charitable fundraising campaign for the Cal Ripken, Sr. Foundation.
NEWS
September 29, 2014
What a breath of fresh air was the letter from Rachel McClellan ( "I'm keeping my Ray Rice jersey," Sept. 24). I don't own a Rice jersey. If I did, I would not only keep it, I would wear it in public. It is always amazing to me how the self-righteous among us can act as if they have the right to "cast the first stone. " To be sure, domestic violence is wrong. In my opinion, all violence is wrong. However, there are always two sides to every incident no matter how egregious it appears.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 24, 1992
Tommy Tune and his fellow cast members from "Bye Bye Birdie" will present a benefit for the Chase-Brexton Clinic and Equity Fights AIDS at 11:30 p.m. Friday at Center Stage, 700 N. Calvert St.Titled "Backstage at Bye Bye Birdie," the benefit is an informal revue of Broadway show tunes that has been performed to sold-out audiences in Washington, Boston, Philadelphia and Tampa, raising a total of more than $50,000.Mr. Tune, a nine-time Tony Award winner, is the headliner in the touring production of "Bye Bye Birdie," currently playing at the Lyric Opera House.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | December 5, 1991
Whoever named Baltimore the nickel city got it wrong. We should have been called the cast-iron town.In the 19th century, Baltimore's iron foundries issued buildings, aquariums, cuspidors, stairs, fences and lawn furniture. We've even got an iron neighborhood.The city's very heavy history has been gathered into a new book, "Baltimore's Cast-Iron Buildings and Architectural Ironwork." From the lovely porch rails of Butchers Hill to Union Square's circular park rotunda, through Mount Vernon Place and Franklin Square, there's iron-clad evidence of Baltimore's casting excellence.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 13, 2006
Children's Theatre of Annapolis will continue this weekend to bring Dr. Seuss' whimsical characters to life in an enchanting production of Seussical the Musical, playing at Anne Arundel Community College's Pascal Center for the Performing Arts. The local version illustrates the Seussical success phenomenon that followed the somewhat disappointing 2001 Broadway run of the Stephen Flaherty/Lynn Ahrens' musical. In Children's Theatre's production, favorite Seuss characters thrive in a lively, innocent environment created by a mostly teenage cast.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | February 3, 2008
Thursday was a good day to go fishing. OK, maybe not like a day in April. Or May. But squeezing in a couple of hours between Wednesday's blow and Friday's wet snow beat sitting around the mothership all day. An ultralight rod and a beat-up old Ugly Stick practically dance into the back seat. A fanny pack filled with lures and other musts join them. Johnny Cash in the dash completes the preparations. First up, a little spot not far from home on Northwest Branch. The trail that runs along the water's edge east and west of Route 29 is part of the Rachel Carson Greenway that will someday stretch 23 miles from upper Montgomery County into Prince George's.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 23, 2004
A very Crozier's Eat the Runt is a play with a gimmick: At each performance, the audience decides which actor plays which role. Here's the way it works at the Audrey Herman Spotlighters Theatre. An actor - Tony Viglione at the performance I attended - comes out and identifies himself as the human resources coordinator at an art museum. After the rest of the cast joins him, he explains that, one by one, he will name a character and ask each actor to speak one of that character's lines. The audience votes, by applauding, on who gives the best line reading and wins the role.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 26, 1992
Tommy Tune and his fellow cast members from "Bye Bye Birdie" will present a benefit for the Chase-Brexton Clinic and Equity Fights AIDS at 11:30 p.m. Friday at Center Stage, 700 N. Calvert St.Titled "Backstage at Bye Bye Birdie," the benefit is an informal revue of Broadway show tunes that has been performed to sold-out audiences in Washington, Boston, Philadelphia and Tampa, raising a total of more than $50,000.Mr. Tune, a nine-time Tony Award winner, is the headliner in the touring production of "Bye Bye Birdie," currently playing at the Lyric Opera House.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
The state attorney general's office is appealing a federal judge's ruling ordering Maryland to use an absentee ballot-marking technology for the disabled that the Board of Elections had refused to certify as secure. The state will ask the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va., to throw out District Judge Richard D. Bennett's decision this month. Bennett found that the election board's refusal to implement the program violated the federal Americans with Disabilities Act. The attorney general's office filed a notice of intent to appeal Monday but did not spell out its objections to the ruling.
NEWS
By Marc B. Terrill | September 22, 2014
Jews around the globe will gather in synagogues Wednesday to mark the start of Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. There is a change in the air as fall approaches; schools are back in session, temperatures begin to drop and there is a general atmosphere of renewal. Jewish tradition encourages us to gather together, reflect on the year that has passed and pray for peace and sustenance in the coming year. The collective strength and spirit felt during this time of year typically energizes all to look ahead with optimism.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
Just seven days ago, Baltimore's sports fans, the faithful clad in orange and purple, were brimming with optimism. The Ravens were set to open what they hoped would be a bounce-back season with star running back Ray Rice due to return at the end of the week from a two-game suspension for a domestic violence incident - a penalty roundly criticized as too light. The Orioles, meanwhile, were rolling toward a division title, leading their nearest rivals by a margin they hadn't enjoyed in decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
I can't remember the last time real-life events recontextualized a work of fiction for me the way Israel's incursion into Gaza has done with "The Honorable Woman" this month. When I first started watching the BBC-made mini-series that starts at 10 p.m. Thursday on the Sundance Channel, I liked almost everything about it -- except Maggie Gyllenhaal. And that was a big problem, because she is the star, playing an Anglo-Israeli businesswoman, Nessa Stein, heavily involved in Middle East philanthropy and politics.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2014
Sen. John McCain of Arizona, a classmate of Charles R. Larson at the U.S. Naval Academy, says the four-star admiral and former academy superintendent was a "dear friend" and "great man" who, like McCain's father and grandfather, cast a large shadow. Admiral Larson, 77, died early Saturday at his home in Annapolis after a long illness. "As the son and grandson of four-star admirals, I have long been accustomed to living in the large shadows cast by great men," McCain said in a statement Sunday afternoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2014
A couple of times during "Sincerely, Me," an ambitious production presented by ArtsCentric, the audience is asked to imagine how poorer our world would be without the legacy of African American women who raised their voices in song. For the bulk of the show's two-and-a-half hours or so, the all-female cast offers a high-octane reminder of that legacy. About 40 covers of songs originally performed by the likes of Aretha Franklin, Patti LaBelle, the Shirelles, and the Supremes are packed into this work, all delivered with intense commitment and energy.
NEWS
By Debra Taylor Young and Debra Taylor Young,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 5, 2002
THE TRADITIONAL fall play has been replaced this year at Liberty and Century high schools by productions that enable the schools to showcase more student actors. Both Eldersburg schools continue to include students in all facets of the production, from sound, lighting, props and set design, but the productions also will feature a large cast of actors. Century's production consists of four one-act plays, two of which are directed by students. Each grade level will perform a production.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2000
Preservationists are scrambling to save one of Baltimore's last buildings with a cast-iron storefront after a fire extensively damaged the historic structure yesterday. In its 121-year history, the five-story building at 423 W. Baltimore St. housed one of the city's largest beer-bottling plants, one of the world's largest umbrella makers and a clothing factory. Today, the building, listed on the National Register of Historic Places for being one of 20 Baltimore structures with a cast-iron storefront, houses a Clark's Express coffee shop, artists' studios and storage space.
NEWS
July 1, 2014
Voting has always been a big deal in my family. I remember being led into the polling booth by my mother during every election for as long as I remember. I've watched her vote for presidents, governors, mayors and everything on down. She is one reason why I was so eager to register to vote once I turned 18. Now that I'm turning 20 and have had the opportunity to vote, I understand the value of our democratic responsibility and try to instill that in others, especially in my peers. I recently read an article about the Afghani presidential election and how the Taliban was chopping off the hands and fingers of those who voted.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
More than 46,500 ballots were cast in the first three days of early voting in the Maryland gubernatorial primary, according to the State Board of Elections. The bulk of those came in the first two days, on Thursday and Friday, when 20,382 ballots and 17,115 ballots were cast, respectively, according to board data. There were 9,024 ballots cast Saturday. The total of 46,521 represents about 1.4 percent of eligible, active voters on precinct registries. Maryland started offering early voting in 2010.
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