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SPORTS
July 30, 1991
Tribute to The GreatestAn audience of 600, including heavyweight champion Evander Holyfield, two former champs and other VIPs, paid tribute in Miami Beach, Fla., yesterday to Muhammad Ali, who won his first title there 27 years ago."Sometimes I have to pinch myself to keep from believing all the praise," Ali, 49, said. "For years I've been telling people I was pretty good. But I've never been one to brag."On Feb. 25, 1964, at the Miami Beach Convention Center, Ali upset Sonny Liston for the first of his three heavyweight titles.
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NEWS
By Gregory Kane | January 10, 2001
READERS OF The Sun have seen several tributes to sportswriter John Steadman in the past week. I hope you will forgive me if I offer another. Louis Grasmick, a friend of Steadman's, thanked me for attending the funeral Friday. "There's no way I couldn't have," I answered. Sounds cliched, but it is nonetheless true: Steadman's death made many feel as if they had lost a dear friend or relative. I grew up reading him. I told that to Steadman when I first met him, here in the newsroom offices one afternoon shortly after I became a columnist.
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FEATURES
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1998
"King of the World," by David Remnick. Random House. 326 pages. $25.On the night of Feb. 25, 1964, in a boxing ring in Miami Beach, one of the most compelling and complicated figures of the 20th century arrived with the whomp of an uppercut.Today, of course, Muhammad Ali is mostly beloved, a heroic icon, an athletic statesman and worldwide ambassador, best remembered in recent years for lighting the torch to begin the 1996 Olympic games in Atlanta, his hands trembling from Parkinson's disease, the proud warrior refusing to let age or disease defeat him. The world cheered.
FEATURES
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1998
"King of the World," by David Remnick. Random House. 326 pages. $25.On the night of Feb. 25, 1964, in a boxing ring in Miami Beach, one of the most compelling and complicated figures of the 20th century arrived with the whomp of an uppercut.Today, of course, Muhammad Ali is mostly beloved, a heroic icon, an athletic statesman and worldwide ambassador, best remembered in recent years for lighting the torch to begin the 1996 Olympic games in Atlanta, his hands trembling from Parkinson's disease, the proud warrior refusing to let age or disease defeat him. The world cheered.
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | January 17, 1992
Muhammad Ali turns 50 today. It is very sad. They'll throw him a grand party, at which he'll desperately try to evoke the Ali of his youth and ours -- and fail. When it's over, he'll mumble his thanks and turn away, a man made old before his time. Let's just say it's a different kind of Ali shuffle now.And yet, those close to him -- there are always people who want to be close to him -- will say he's OK, that the disorder, Parkinson's syndrome, isn't as bad as it looks. But you know that it is. Or, anyway, you feel that it is, and because it's Ali, you don't see what there is to celebrate.
NEWS
By S. M. Khalid | July 28, 1991
MUHAMMAD ALI: HIS LIFE AND TIMES.Thomas Hauser.Simon & Schuster.544 pages. $24.95. During his 30 years in the public eye as perhaps the world's most famous man, Muhammad Ali has elicited the whole range of emotions of millions of people, from love to hate.He was perhaps, as he had claimed, "the Greatest" -- arguably the best heavyweight and, perhaps, the greatest boxer there ever was. Not only blessed with unusually fast hands and feet, Mr. Ali also possessed remarkable recuperative powers, an iron chin and the strongest will to win.Still, nearly 10 years since his last fight, Mr. Ali remains as much as an enigma as he did when he first achieved international prominence as the young, irrepressible loudmouth who won the world's heavyweight championship in 1964 as Cassius Clay.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | October 22, 1990
First there was David using a slingshot to bring Goliath toto his knees. Then Horatius at the Bridge (but not the Oakland Bay Bridge) and, finally, the accomplishments of the Cincinnati Reds. They all won against improbable odds. Almost the occult but not quite.The Oakland A's, considered the all-consummate team, got flattened in four straight World Series games by the underrated representatives from Cincinnati who were 30-1 underdogs. Not only did they beat them, but they also achieved a glorious sweep.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | January 10, 2001
READERS OF The Sun have seen several tributes to sportswriter John Steadman in the past week. I hope you will forgive me if I offer another. Louis Grasmick, a friend of Steadman's, thanked me for attending the funeral Friday. "There's no way I couldn't have," I answered. Sounds cliched, but it is nonetheless true: Steadman's death made many feel as if they had lost a dear friend or relative. I grew up reading him. I told that to Steadman when I first met him, here in the newsroom offices one afternoon shortly after I became a columnist.
SPORTS
December 15, 1991
Q. How old was Archie Moore when he fought Muhammad Ali, then Cassius Clay, in the 1960s?Henry WeissGary LockettBaltimoreA. Fairy tales can come true, it can happen to you, if you're young at heart -- so goes the song. Maybe Moore was young at heart when he fought Clay on Nov. 15, 1962, in Los Angeles. But, according to "The Ring Boxing Encyclopedia and Record Book," Clay had a bigger advantage; he was young, period -- 20. Moore was 48. Take that, George Foreman.
SPORTS
By New York Daily News | February 18, 1991
Former heavyweight champion Joe Frazier is writing a book. It's his autobiography and he promises it will be best-seller material.The title: "Joe Frazier, the Champ Nobody Knows.""This will be about the ordinary Joe -- who ain't so ordinary," says Frazier, with his familiar grin.The former champ gets serious when he tells you more than a few chapters will be on the man he still calls Cassius Clay."It's stuff you never read in any newspapers," says Frazier, who engaged Muhammad Ali in three of the most memorable fights ever.
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | January 17, 1992
Muhammad Ali turns 50 today. It is very sad. They'll throw him a grand party, at which he'll desperately try to evoke the Ali of his youth and ours -- and fail. When it's over, he'll mumble his thanks and turn away, a man made old before his time. Let's just say it's a different kind of Ali shuffle now.And yet, those close to him -- there are always people who want to be close to him -- will say he's OK, that the disorder, Parkinson's syndrome, isn't as bad as it looks. But you know that it is. Or, anyway, you feel that it is, and because it's Ali, you don't see what there is to celebrate.
SPORTS
July 30, 1991
Tribute to The GreatestAn audience of 600, including heavyweight champion Evander Holyfield, two former champs and other VIPs, paid tribute in Miami Beach, Fla., yesterday to Muhammad Ali, who won his first title there 27 years ago."Sometimes I have to pinch myself to keep from believing all the praise," Ali, 49, said. "For years I've been telling people I was pretty good. But I've never been one to brag."On Feb. 25, 1964, at the Miami Beach Convention Center, Ali upset Sonny Liston for the first of his three heavyweight titles.
NEWS
By S. M. Khalid | July 28, 1991
MUHAMMAD ALI: HIS LIFE AND TIMES.Thomas Hauser.Simon & Schuster.544 pages. $24.95. During his 30 years in the public eye as perhaps the world's most famous man, Muhammad Ali has elicited the whole range of emotions of millions of people, from love to hate.He was perhaps, as he had claimed, "the Greatest" -- arguably the best heavyweight and, perhaps, the greatest boxer there ever was. Not only blessed with unusually fast hands and feet, Mr. Ali also possessed remarkable recuperative powers, an iron chin and the strongest will to win.Still, nearly 10 years since his last fight, Mr. Ali remains as much as an enigma as he did when he first achieved international prominence as the young, irrepressible loudmouth who won the world's heavyweight championship in 1964 as Cassius Clay.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | October 22, 1990
First there was David using a slingshot to bring Goliath toto his knees. Then Horatius at the Bridge (but not the Oakland Bay Bridge) and, finally, the accomplishments of the Cincinnati Reds. They all won against improbable odds. Almost the occult but not quite.The Oakland A's, considered the all-consummate team, got flattened in four straight World Series games by the underrated representatives from Cincinnati who were 30-1 underdogs. Not only did they beat them, but they also achieved a glorious sweep.
SPORTS
October 12, 2008
1 Payoff time: The $390,000 winner's purse is at stake today in the final round of the Constellation Energy Senior Players Championship at Baltimore Country Club (4 p.m., ch. 11). First tee is 8:30 a.m. 2 'I shook up the world': It's Cassius Clay's last fight, sort of. He meets champ Sonny Liston in 1964 (1 p.m., ESPN Classic). The next day, Clay said he was changing his name to Muhammad Ali. 3 Raising awareness: Figure skaters, gymnasts and musical performers look to raise awareness of women's cancers in the two-hour "Frosted Pink With a Twist" (4 p.m., Ch. 2)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 26, 1996
Tonight's line-up makes one thing perfectly clear: Boy, do I miss those Muppets."Babylon 5" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WNUV, Channel 54) -- Is that really Arthur, King of the Britons, aboard ship? Guest star Michael York says so. UPN."Boy Meets World" (8: 30 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Cory (Ben Savage) finds himself back in the '50s, where he has the misfortune of running into Potsie (Anson Williams) from "Happy Days." After a few minutes with Potsie (wonder if he'll sing?), I'm sure Cory can't wait to get home.
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