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May 28, 2013
Crab Casserole for 15 Gail Smith of the Woodbrook-Murray Hill Garden Club remembers her mother making this large, crab-heavy casserole when she entertained. This recipe was reprinted with permission from "The First 50 Years: a Collection of Recipes," a cookbook published by the Woodbrook-Murray Hill Garden Club. Makes 15 servings salt and pepper to taste 3 slices bread, made into fine crumbs 1 teaspoon dry mustard 3 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce 1 cup mayonnaise, plus an additional 3-4 tablespoons (optional)
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NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2013
Eighty pounds of chicken. Fifty pounds of beef. One hundred pounds of pasta. Those are a few of the ingredients layered into large rectangle tins Sunday afternoon during a marathon casserole-building frenzy. Dubbed Holy Casseroley, the event drew dozens of members of Har Sinai Congregation in Owings Mills and their friends who wanted to help a group of people most will never meet. The volunteers assembled 1,250 casseroles, enough to feed visitors to the soup kitchen at Paul's Place in Washington Village/Pigtown for a week.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman,
For The Baltimore Sun
| May 1, 2013
Stanley Levy from Baltimore was in search of the recipe for the cheesy potato casserole that he enjoyed at a Cracker Barrel restaurant in Pennsylvania. He said it reminded him of macaroni and cheese but instead of pasta it was made with potatoes. A search of the Cracker Barrel website did not yield any recipes, so I contacted the company's office of corporate communications outside Nashville. Tenn., and described the dish that Levy was seeking. They thought that in all likelihood it was the popular hash brown casserole.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2013
Mary Sloan Roby of Baltimore was looking for the recipe for the crab casserole from the old Robertson's Cafeteria in Charleston, S.C. She said it was very creamy and had cheddar cheese melted on the top. Carol Smith of Ellicott City, who said she enjoys researching recipes, thinks she has found it. It comes from an article in the Post & Courier newspaper in Charleston published in June 2006. Frank DuRoss, a manager at Robertson's, had sent in the recipe for the crab casserole from the legendary restaurant.
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 28, 2005
Peggy Snyder from Hillsdale, N.Y., was looking for a lost recipe for an easy salmon casserole. It once appeared on a box of Caesar croutons and was made using canned salmon and the croutons. Roz Goldman from Pikesville is sure that she has the recipe Peggy has lost. She says that she has made it many times and can confirm that "it's easy to prepare and enjoyed by all." s Taste section were calculated by registered dietitian Jodie Shield, except where noted.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 1, 2004
Kathy Cotugno of Woodstock, Ill., was looking for a recipe for a tuna-and-potato-chip casserole that did not contain any noodles. Many readers sent us the same recipe for this old-fashioned classic. Most have had it in their collections for many years. For some, it was one of the first dishes they learned to prepare and for all it is still a tried-and-true family favorite. It is by no means a fancy dish, but it is truly a comfort food that kids and grown-ups alike are sure to enjoy. I recommend spending the extra money and using a white albacore tuna packed in water.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | March 12, 2008
Dorothea Sibley of Manchester, Wash., was looking for a recipe for a corned-beef-and-cabbage casserole similar to the one that she had from the 1940s, taken from a label on a can of corned beef. Renee Fajgier Kucowski of Lawrenceville, N.J., sent in a recipe that her father shared with her for the casserole. She says that even though she is not a big fan of corned beef and cabbage, she loves this casserole. I must admit I had never made anything with canned corned beef before. Its appearance is a bit off-putting, but if you can get beyond that, this casserole could be a nice alternative to the traditional corned-beef-and-cabbage meal.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | April 3, 1991
Catherine Morris of Dundalk recently requested a seafoo casserole recipe using shrimp, scallops and crabmeat. Patricia Cronin Ganc of Wilmington, Del. sent us this recipe. "I catered a small dinner party for a neighbor and used this recipe as the entree. Delicious!," she writes.Casserole St. Jacques1 pound scallops1 cup dry white wine1 small sliced onion1 tablespoon chopped parsley2 teaspoons lemon juice4 tablespoons butter6 tablespoons flour1 cup light cream2 ounces shredded Gruyere cheese (Swiss can be substituted)
NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,Chicago Tribune | October 3, 2007
The products sitting on my kitchen counter the other night were all items to be tested at home: a can of cream of chicken soup, a jar of curry powder, a tin of tuna packed in water. To that lineup I added, among other things, a yellow onion and a $9 bottle of sauvignon blanc. After looking to the back of the soup can for inspiration, I found that these ingredients lent themselves to a homey casserole. The result is rather old-fashioned. This is how so many moms of my youth used to cook when they were being "creative" and enthusiasm outweighed real ability in the kitchen.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | April 18, 2007
This is a new version of the tuna casserole Mom used to make. Instead of baking the casserole for an hour, I just sauteed the vegetables, mixed them with the boiled pasta and finished the dish under the broiler to melt the cheese. It's a meal you can make in minutes without a trip to a supermarket if you keep these staples on hand: canned tuna, macaroni, canned pimentos, Worcestershire sauce, carrots, onions and frozen peas. One item I find very useful is dried mushrooms, especially wild mushrooms.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2013
B&O American Brasserie sous chef (and native Marylander) Matt Kane spends his days off getting down and dirty in his kitchen with his 4-year old daughter Addison. Together, they cook hearty breakfasts, like this simple but delicious vegetable-heavy Denver omelet casserole. "This is a great recipe to do with kids because it allows them to get a little messy, have fun and eat well without realizing it," says Kane. Kane takes a casual approach to cooking with kids, understanding that small hands aren't able to do everything perfectly.
FEATURES
May 28, 2013
Crab Casserole for 15 Gail Smith of the Woodbrook-Murray Hill Garden Club remembers her mother making this large, crab-heavy casserole when she entertained. This recipe was reprinted with permission from "The First 50 Years: a Collection of Recipes," a cookbook published by the Woodbrook-Murray Hill Garden Club. Makes 15 servings salt and pepper to taste 3 slices bread, made into fine crumbs 1 teaspoon dry mustard 3 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce 1 cup mayonnaise, plus an additional 3-4 tablespoons (optional)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman,
For The Baltimore Sun
| May 1, 2013
Stanley Levy from Baltimore was in search of the recipe for the cheesy potato casserole that he enjoyed at a Cracker Barrel restaurant in Pennsylvania. He said it reminded him of macaroni and cheese but instead of pasta it was made with potatoes. A search of the Cracker Barrel website did not yield any recipes, so I contacted the company's office of corporate communications outside Nashville. Tenn., and described the dish that Levy was seeking. They thought that in all likelihood it was the popular hash brown casserole.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
Brenda Cox from Raleigh, N.C., was looking for a recipe for making a baked spaghetti casserole like the one her mother used to make back in the 1950s. She remembers that her mother used tomato soup in her recipe. She has tried over the years to recreate the dish without success. Wilma Muir from Street saw Cox's request and sent in a recipe for the casserole that she said she found in one of her old cookbooks called "A Campbell Cookbook, Cooking with Soup," revised in 1982.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2012
Add some personality to your meals with these oven-to-table cocottes from the Martha Stewart Collection, a fun way to personalize dishes from baked puddings to casseroles. Each lidded ceramic dish holds eight ounces. Sold in pairs, choose either the green cow/blue duck combo or the red chick/yellow rabbit. The cocottes are oven-safe to 450 degrees and dishwasher-safe. Each box also has a sample recipe. Set of two, $34.99 at Macy's stores and macys.com. — John-John Williams IV , The Baltimore Sun .
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2011
Russell Brown, executive chef at O'Learys Seafood Restaurant in Annapolis, was in Today's Kitchen on Nov. 18 with Al Roker and Natalie Morales. The funniest thing happened. See, Brown is demonstrating how to make swordfish steak au poivre, and Morales notices that among the ingredients on the counter was white wine. So, Morales asks Brown about it, and then Al Roker makes it seem like Morales was interested because she wanted to DRINK the wine!!!!! You can watch this classic TV moment here . The Wall Street Journal's Speakeasy blog is running Thanksgiving Tips from the Stars -- here's a recipe for Brussels sprouts with pancetta from Chazz Palminteri, which you can try for yourself at Chazz: A Bronx Original in Baltmore's beautiful Harbor East.
NEWS
By Renee Enna | April 23, 2008
This vegetarian Italian "casserole" is mostly a stove-top preparation. Instead of making our own marinara, we're using a good-quality jarred version. (But nothing's stopping you from using your own!) Cooking the ingredients on the stove top, then popping a pan into the oven just long enough to melt the cheese and warm all the ingredients together, gives this entree the feel of a long-cooking casserole, minus the long cooking. If you want meat, add chopped pepperoni to taste when you heat the sauce and mushrooms, or just use a meat-based pasta sauce.
FEATURES
By Felicia Gressette and Felicia Gressette,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 29, 1993
In culinary defense of the casserole, I would like to point out that cuisines the world over are dotted with them. Cassoulet, the famous French baked bean dish, is a casserole. So is choucroute garni -- sauerkraut baked with sausages and other smoked meats. So are lasagna, moussaka, jambalaya and arroz con pollo.Besides, there's nothing like a ready-for-the-oven casserole to bail out a tired working cook or save the day when friends decide to stay for supper. If the dish is frozen, just pop it into the microwave for a quick defrost, then bake as usual (adding a few extra minutes)
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