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Dan Rodricks | August 9, 2014
Nobody asked me, but … the fans who gave Ray Rice a standing ovation before Thursday's preseason game apparently have not read the Ravens' fan behavior policy - specifically, the part that says: "Fans help shape the Ravens' image. " They also missed this: "Have fun, root hard, show respect for the fans around you, but don't be a jerk!" The policy obviously needs to be revised. Along with cowbells and coolers, it ought to prohibit mass displays of obtuseness about domestic violence.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Over the past decade, American casino-goers have come to expect more than just free drinks at the poker table. They want great food, too. Big-name chefs and strong culinary skills have become de rigeur at casinos, and even non-gamblers recognize that casino-adjacent restaurants might be worth a try. At Hanover's Maryland Live! Casino, the newest culinary outpost, Luk Fu, is a pan-Asian restaurant located right on the casino floor. While the food at Luk Fu is likable, service is slower than it should be, especially in an action-packed casino.
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NEWS
June 15, 2011
It is time to recycle this once proud and true Baltimore landmark, Harborplace ("Phillips leaving Harborplace," June11). It has served its purpose well, and with Jim Rouse's and Mayor Schaefer' vision took a once languishing passing through town and made it a destination city, attracting in some years even more people than Disney World. Now our great city is again on the decline, it is aging, and but for the Grand Prix, it is boring. So it is time once again to leverage our unique harbor assets to bring Baltimore out of the desert to soar once again.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
About 10,000 gamblers, well-connected guests and curious local residents are expected to come to the city a week from tonight for the grand opening of the Horseshoe Casino Baltimore, launching what city officials hope will be a powerful economic engine. The debut will be a test for city officials and business leaders, who face a stack of logistical hurdles in the casino's first week. Opening night of Maryland's fifth and most urban casino overlaps with an Orioles game at Oriole Park at Camden Yards . There are six more home games the first week - including on Saturday, when the Navy football team also will be in town to play Ohio State at M&T Bank Stadium.
NEWS
February 22, 2012
 Sen. Anthony Muse, who represents the district that includes National Harbor, testified in a Senate hearing Wednesday against Prince George's ExecutiveRushern L. Baker III's plan to locate a high-end casino there. Muse said he objected to the way Baker excluded him and other local representatives from consultation over the county's choice -- calling it a breach of legislative courtesy. He asked senators to delay any decision -- which could push a required referendum into 2014.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2010
More than 1,500 people came to the Perryville Outlet Center to apply for jobs at the Hollywood Casino Perryville Thursday, according to a spokesman. The Cecil Co. casino, one of the first gaming facilities scheduled to open in Maryland after slots were approved, is expected to open in late fall. About 350 people are expected to be hired in positions such as gaming, food and beverage, security and accounting as well as human resources. Hollywood representatives met with candidates during the job fair to offer more information about available positions.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2012
The Washington Redskins football team endorsed a yes vote in the ultra-expensive gambling expansion referendum heading for the Maryland ballot this fall, contending the measure will bring thousands of jobs to Prince George's County. The NFL team, which trains in Northern Virginia but plays its home games in Prince George's, said it was joining a coalition of businesses that support Question 7, which would permit a casino in the county and allow table games at Maryland's current and planned slots parlors.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2012
As spending on Maryland's gambling expansion nears the $50 million mark, The Sun is introducing a new feature to its Maryland Politics page: the Casino Spend-o-Meter. The interactive graphic will allow devotees of Maryland political excess to track at a glance the amount of money being shoveled out the door by the ballot committees on either side of Question 7, which would allow a new Prince George's County casino and permit table games there and at other Maryland casinos. The referendum pits two casino-backed groups against each other: FOR Maryland Jobs and Schools vs. Get the Facts: Vote No on 7. The "for" side is financed mostly by MGM Resorts International, the prospective operator of a "destination resort" casino at National Harbor.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | July 20, 2012
On Wednesday, Gov. Martin O'Malley said it was his "hope" to share a draft casino expansion bill with the Baltimore city House delegation by today. It appears those hopes have been dashed. O'Malley spokeswoman Raquel Guillory said putting the bill together is proving "complicated" and a draft would not be released after all. She did not give a new date. She also downplayed rumors that a date for the special session has been determined. "First we need a bill, then we can set a date," Guillory said.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | September 11, 2012
Developer Milt Peterson will put $400,000 into an effort to expand gambling in Maryland, the first non-casino interest to write a check. Peterson hopes to partner with gambling giant MGM Resorts International to build a resort-casino on the Potomac River. But first Maryland voters need to approve a referendum question in November that would authorize a sixth casino and table games all gambling locations. "We believe Peterson's investment in Vote for 7 is particularly important given their first hand experience with the job growth and economic development that a project of this magnitude can bring to the region," said Kristin Hawn, a spokeswoman for Vote for 7, a committee supporting more gambling in the state.  MGM has already put $5.4 million behind and effort to convince Marylanders to vote yes. Penn National Gaming is funding an effort to oppose the ballot measure.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Baltimore officials plan to divert $3 million in anticipated casino revenue that had been earmarked for community improvements to replace a major artery in the city's underground steam pipe system. The proposal has drawn criticism from local elected officials and community leaders who say it is a misuse of the funds to be generated by the new Horseshoe Casino Baltimore. They want the money to be used for neighborhood-oriented projects, such as walking trails or efforts to connect unemployed residents with jobs.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
A siren sounded loudly Friday inside the Horseshoe Casino Baltimore, jolting reporters getting a first peek at the vast, $442 million development featuring more than 100 table games and 2,500 slot machines, including machines on outside terraces to accommodate smokers. After the Aug. 26 opening, a shrieking alert might indicate a jackpot. This one was part of a fire-alarm test at the casino, Maryland's fifth. "The joys of building and testing," said general manager Chad Barnhill with a smile as the siren continued to wail.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Maryland Lottery sales dropped again for a second year in a row as they compete with the state's casinos for the gambler's dollar, the state agency reported Monday. The drop of 1.7 percent for the fiscal year ending on June 30 follows a drop of 2.2 percent the prior year, which was the first time in 15 years that sales had not grown, said Stephen Martino, director of the Maryland Lottery and Gaming Control Agency. The first drop came in the year after the opening of Maryland Live in Arundel Mills, the state's largest casino.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 9, 2014
Nobody asked me, but … the fans who gave Ray Rice a standing ovation before Thursday's preseason game apparently have not read the Ravens' fan behavior policy - specifically, the part that says: "Fans help shape the Ravens' image. " They also missed this: "Have fun, root hard, show respect for the fans around you, but don't be a jerk!" The policy obviously needs to be revised. Along with cowbells and coolers, it ought to prohibit mass displays of obtuseness about domestic violence.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Joan Mainhart had wrapped up a moderately successful day playing the slots at Maryland Live - walking in with $100, stepping out with $150 - but standing outside the casino in the afternoon sun Friday she considered whether she would take a shot at a million-dollar jackpot for $500 a spin. The retired IRS paralegal from Linthicum thought a moment and came to a definite maybe: "Only if I hit the lottery, then I might splurge. " Otherwise, she said, "there's just no way. " From the regular folks like Mainhart who play the quarter and dollar machines to the high-rollers who think nothing of pumping a few grand into a slot machine, people will have their chance soon enough at the state's biggest slots jackpot as Maryland Live unveils a new $1 million machine at 11 p.m. Saturday.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
Maryland's four casinos brought in $75.9 million in July, a jump of nearly 10 percent from the same month a year earlier, with the bulk of the increase coming from the state's largest casino, Maryland Live, the state lottery agency reported Tuesday. The total for slot machines and table game revenues was up 9.7 percent, or $6.7 million, from July 2013. Most of that increase came at Maryland Live in Arundel Mills where revenue jumped 11 percent year-over-year to $58.2 million in July.
NEWS
July 9, 2013
The Sun's recent headlines about rising gambling revenues neglect to note the fact that the companies' profits, or course, represent money lost by the players ("Casino take soars in June," July 6). Add this to the increases in the gasoline tax and bridge and highway tolls, and one would think that the state of Maryland and Baltimore would have no more need of additional taxes. Dream on. What if it doesn't rain? No runoff taxes. What happens if we drink less water? Headline: "Water tax collection drops - people breaking into fire hydrants.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2012
Gwyn Eppard of Baltimore said the tip-off that something was fishy came when the woman caller purporting to represent the campaign of Del. Sandy Rosenberg didn't know the lawmaker's party but launched into a pitch for a casino in Prince George's County. "That made me kind of suspicious," she said.  Rosenberg, a Northwest Baltimore Democrat, said the call did not come from his campaign. "I certainly did not authorize anybody to call on my behalf," he said. "I certainly don't pay money to solicitors to pay people.
NEWS
August 5, 2014
Last week, the Maryland Democratic Party took a swipe at Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan for his decision to use public campaign financing during the primary and general elections, noting in a news release that Mr. Hogan, "who often claims to be the only candidate who will protect tax dollars, received over $320,000 in taxpayer funds for the Republican primary and nearly $2.6 million for the general election. " But a story today in the Washington Post about the free flow of campaign contributions from the owner of one of Maryland's casino licenses to the coffers of the Democratic gubernatorial candidate, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, and his running mate, Howard County Executive Ken Ulman, offers a reminder of just how wise an investment public campaign financing is. The Democratic party is trying to make hay out of the idea that some of those taxpayer funds (donated willingly, incidentally, through a check-off box on state income tax returns)
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
By the time police arrived at the Maryland Live casino parking garage, Mary McGinnis had been sitting in the passenger seat of the red Ford pickup truck for about five hours, waiting as her son played blackjack inside. The 98-year-old woman, who uses a wheelchair to get around, appeared to be confused about where she was but not physically harmed. Returning to the garage after police called him, Dwight R. McGinnis, her 67-year-old son, was arrested and charged with abuse or neglect of a vulnerable adult, a misdemeanor, according to the police report.
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