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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 18, 1994
NEW YORK -- In one of the biggest computer errors in banking history, Chemical Bank mistakenly deducted about $15 million from more than 100,000 customers' accounts on Tuesday night, causing panic and consternation among its customers around the New York area.The problem stemmed from a single line in an updated computer program installed by Chemical on Tuesday that caused the bank to process every withdrawal and transfer at its automated teller machines twice.Thus, a person who took $100 from a cash machine had $200 deducted, although the receipt indicated a withdrawal of only $100.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
The Baltimore City Council voted unanimously Monday to ban automated kiosks that give money on the spot for used electronics - part of an effort to curb cellphone thefts. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake praised the decision. "Tonight's vote was a step in the right direction for a safer Baltimore," she said in a statement. "These machines have been known to attract criminal activity, making it harder for communities to be safe. I support this ban and additional efforts that government and private industry can make to reduce incidents of crime surrounding these machines and to improve technologies that can permanently deactivate a stolen cell phone - making the device obsolete and reducing the incentive for criminals to steal them.
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NEWS
By ANDREI CODRESCU | July 17, 1995
Las Vegas, Nevada -- A 7-year-old girl with a fat tear glistening in the corner of her eye held tight to her 14-year-old brother's hand. They were sitting on a ledge in the Arcade Mall at the MGM Grand, Las Vegas, waiting for mom and dad.The time was midnight. The Arcades were closed. A sign overhead said: ''Youth Activities Center/Cash Machine.'' The Youth Activities Center was closed. But the Cash Machine blinked happily open. Straight ahead was the (closed) entrance to the MGM Grand Adventures Park, where they had spent the day going over the Grand Canyon Rapids, watching two pirate ships fight, going deep into the Haunted Mine and Going Over the Edge on a huge slide.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | October 6, 2007
One of the bandits charged with cracking into or stealing more than 30 automatic teller machines since 2003 was sentenced yesterday to almost three years in prison. In U.S. District Court in Baltimore, Judge Catherine C. Blake sentenced Charles E. Harrison, 48, of Upper Marlboro to 33 months in prison for conspiring to commit bank larceny. The judge also ordered Harrison to pay restitution of $229,000. Harrison and five other defendants were indicted March 1, 2006, accused of stealing ATMs in Maryland and Virginia.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | October 6, 2007
One of the bandits charged with cracking into or stealing more than 30 automatic teller machines since 2003 was sentenced yesterday to almost three years in prison. In U.S. District Court in Baltimore, Judge Catherine C. Blake sentenced Charles E. Harrison, 48, of Upper Marlboro to 33 months in prison for conspiring to commit bank larceny. The judge also ordered Harrison to pay restitution of $229,000. Harrison and five other defendants were indicted March 1, 2006, accused of stealing ATMs in Maryland and Virginia.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
The Baltimore City Council voted unanimously Monday to ban automated kiosks that give money on the spot for used electronics - part of an effort to curb cellphone thefts. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake praised the decision. "Tonight's vote was a step in the right direction for a safer Baltimore," she said in a statement. "These machines have been known to attract criminal activity, making it harder for communities to be safe. I support this ban and additional efforts that government and private industry can make to reduce incidents of crime surrounding these machines and to improve technologies that can permanently deactivate a stolen cell phone - making the device obsolete and reducing the incentive for criminals to steal them.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,SUN COLUMNIST | May 2, 2006
My fellow mothers and I barely have time to read the mail, let alone an out-of-town newspaper. But word of a recent New York Times news story zinged through our ranks like word of a neighborhood divorce. Under the headline "The Bank of Mom and Dad," reporter Anna Bahney described a disturbing trend: young adults, some in their 30s, are receiving from their parents regular stipends of thousands of dollars a year. The reason? Stalled wages, skyrocketing housing prices, student loans, delayed marriage and "young people [taking]
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | February 16, 1997
Jeong H. Kim built his company on an obscure technology called ATM. No, this ATM is not an automated teller machine. But it will let him make more trips to the bank than most people could ever imagine.That's because the 36-year old former Navy submarine officer and Johns Hopkins-trained engineer took his 4-year-old company public Feb. 5 in the midst of an historic initial public offering boom. When he did, Yurie Systems Inc. of Lanham turned out to be one of the top initial public offerings of the young year.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | June 27, 1993
There's a new pictogram coming to an international airport near you. The signs are designed to direct passengers to cash machines that spew the local currency in more than 90 major airports worldwide, according to the Visa/Plus ATM network. The design shows a featureless character holding up a magnetic-stripped card in front of a cash machine.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 3, 1998
Two robbers hit a 16-year-old girl making a cash machine withdrawal in Town Center in Columbia and stole an undetermined amount of cash Tuesday night, police said.About 11 p.m., two men approached the teen-ager as she stood near an ATM in the 10000 block of Governor Warfield Parkway, police said.The men struck the girl, demanded her identification number, stole cash and fled, police said.The teen-ager was treated at Howard County General Hospital for minor injuries and released.Pub Date: 4/03/98
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,SUN COLUMNIST | May 2, 2006
My fellow mothers and I barely have time to read the mail, let alone an out-of-town newspaper. But word of a recent New York Times news story zinged through our ranks like word of a neighborhood divorce. Under the headline "The Bank of Mom and Dad," reporter Anna Bahney described a disturbing trend: young adults, some in their 30s, are receiving from their parents regular stipends of thousands of dollars a year. The reason? Stalled wages, skyrocketing housing prices, student loans, delayed marriage and "young people [taking]
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | February 16, 1997
Jeong H. Kim built his company on an obscure technology called ATM. No, this ATM is not an automated teller machine. But it will let him make more trips to the bank than most people could ever imagine.That's because the 36-year old former Navy submarine officer and Johns Hopkins-trained engineer took his 4-year-old company public Feb. 5 in the midst of an historic initial public offering boom. When he did, Yurie Systems Inc. of Lanham turned out to be one of the top initial public offerings of the young year.
NEWS
By ANDREI CODRESCU | July 17, 1995
Las Vegas, Nevada -- A 7-year-old girl with a fat tear glistening in the corner of her eye held tight to her 14-year-old brother's hand. They were sitting on a ledge in the Arcade Mall at the MGM Grand, Las Vegas, waiting for mom and dad.The time was midnight. The Arcades were closed. A sign overhead said: ''Youth Activities Center/Cash Machine.'' The Youth Activities Center was closed. But the Cash Machine blinked happily open. Straight ahead was the (closed) entrance to the MGM Grand Adventures Park, where they had spent the day going over the Grand Canyon Rapids, watching two pirate ships fight, going deep into the Haunted Mine and Going Over the Edge on a huge slide.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 18, 1994
NEW YORK -- In one of the biggest computer errors in banking history, Chemical Bank mistakenly deducted about $15 million from more than 100,000 customers' accounts on Tuesday night, causing panic and consternation among its customers around the New York area.The problem stemmed from a single line in an updated computer program installed by Chemical on Tuesday that caused the bank to process every withdrawal and transfer at its automated teller machines twice.Thus, a person who took $100 from a cash machine had $200 deducted, although the receipt indicated a withdrawal of only $100.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane and Gregory P. Kane,Sun Staff Writer | August 9, 1995
Deterring automated teller machine robberies is simple. Just think of the place a mugger would hate and stick a cash machine there.Like, say, a police station.Yesterday, Anne Arundel became the first county in the state to have ATMs in police station lobbies. The machines, run by the Anne Arundel County Employees Federal Credit Union, are open 24 hours a day, seven days a week.Capt. Michael P. Fitzgibbons, the man who came up with the idea, called it a "no-brainer." His boss, Chief Robert A. Beck, labeled it "fantastic."
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1996
A man who tried to rob an automated teller machine customer in Columbia may have stolen money from a woman at a cash machine in Ellicott City about an hour later, Howard County police said yesterday.About 5 p.m. Sunday, Clyde Mountjoy, 45, of Wheaton was driving away from a Provident bank at 10440 Little Patuxent Parkway in the Columbia's Town Center when he was approached by a man who demanded money but did not display a weapon, said Sgt. Steven Keller, a police spokesman.Mountjoy talked briefly with the man before quickly driving away, Keller said.
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