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Cash Flow

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BUSINESS
By Maria Mallory and Maria Mallory,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 4, 1991
WASHINGTON -- For the next several years, Marriott Corp. will focus on virtually one thing: generating much-needed cash to cover its mountainous $3.5 billion debt load.Chairman and President J. W. Marriott Jr. told the more than 2,000 shareholders who crowded yesterday's annual meeting in Washington, "We are changing the financial focus of Marriott Corp. to put greater emphasis on cash flow and more productive use of capital."For more than two hours, Mr. Marriott's focus shifted from issues of minority hiring and board representation, to the time and location of the annual meeting as he answered shareholder's queries.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2014
One day after emerging from bankruptcy, W.R. Grace & Co. announced that it may repurchase up to $500 million in stock over the next one to two years. The Columbia-based chemical maker ended a 13-year bankruptcy reorganization Monday, paying off all its debts and setting aside more than $4 billion in trusts to cover its asbestos liabilities. "This program demonstrates our commitment to increasing long-term shareholder value," said Fred Festa, Grace's chairman and CEO. "Our strong balance sheet and cash flow provide the financial flexibility both to invest in growth and return capital to shareholders.
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BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1998
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. shares fell 5.2 percent yesterday after the company said a weak advertising market and expensive programming will cause a decline in its third-quarter cash flow.The Baltimore company's disclosure came as it reported a second-quarter increase of 31.8 percent in broadcast cash flow, the industry's key earnings measure."The second quarter was fine," said William Meyers, a New York-based analyst with BancAmerica Robertson Stephens. "The issue relates more to the third-quarter outlook."
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2014
T. Rowe Price closed two funds focused on smaller companies to new investors Thursday, a move the firm said was designed to protect the traditionally risky funds from their own success. The assets of the roughly $15.5 billion New Horizons Fund, which has investments in tech firms including Twitter, Netflix and Chinese video site Youku.com, have risen by almost $11 billion since 2002, according to the company. Returns rose 49 percent in 2013. The assets of the roughly $10.2 billion Small-Cap Stock Fund, which has investments in Jack in the Box and pharmaceutical company Incyte Corp.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | July 30, 1994
Host Marriott Corp. said its cash flow rose 9 percent during the second quarter, and it earned twice as much as it needed to pay interest on the heavy debt load it assumed in the controversial breakup of Marriott Corp. last October.Host Marriott, which took over Marriott's company-owned hotels and its airport and toll-road concession business, said it earned $99 million before interest, taxes and depreciation during the 12 weeks that ended June 17, up from $91 million a year ago.The company's net income stayed at the break-even mark Host Marriott would have posted in the second quarter of 1993 had the breakup of Marriott occurred by then.
BUSINESS
By Stephen L. Rosenstein | June 8, 2008
Monitoring cash flow is vital to the well-being of your business. Minor "hiccups" can be expected, but they also can be an early warning of larger problems ahead, especially if other indicators such as sales seem positive. Though critically important, monitoring and predicting cash flow is a matter of consistently following some common-sense financial management practices. The object is to make certain that more cash enters your business than exits. First, you need to translate sales into real money as quickly as possible.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1996
Business doesn't get much better than what Host Marriott Corp. has these days: hot products, low costs and limited competition.Its key profit gauge soared 58 percent last quarter, the Bethesda-based company said yesterday, pleasing industry analysts and sending its stock to another high.The results were "better than good," said Jack Kasprzak, who follows Host Marriott for Davenport & Co., a Richmond, Va.-based investment firm. "They surprised everyone, myself included. I didn't think the hotel business would be as strong as it is after three really good years.
BUSINESS
By Tami Luhby and Tami Luhby,Newsday | July 15, 2007
Until now Rachel Rohrs hasn't had to worry too much about money. A member of the Adelphi University class of 2007, Rohrs lived at home with her parents in South Hempstead, N.Y., while in college. Her tuition costs were covered by a scholarship and contributions from her parents. She paid her credit-card bills with earnings from a part-time job. Soon, though, Rohrs will start a crash course in managing money. She is moving to Baltimore in August, after she marries Kyle Petrowski, a graduate student at the Johns Hopkins University.
BUSINESS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2000
Comcast Corp., the nation's third-largest cable television operator, reported that its second-quarter profit dropped 77 percent but that its operating cash flow improved 32 percent. The company posted a net profit of $180.1 million, or 19 cents a diluted share, compared with $816.4 million, or $1.01 a share, in the second quarter of 1999. Comcast's operating cash flow rose to $602.8 million, a 32 percent increase from $457.3 million in the second quarter of 1999. Operating cash flow is the most important factor in assessing cable companies' performance, because swaps and acquisitions cause actual income to fluctuate so much.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1999
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. reported yesterday that its revenue and broadcast cash flow were up in the second quarter, attributing the increases in part to an acquisition campaign that has had the side effect of plunging the company deeply into debt.After charges and dividends paid to preferred shareholders, Baltimore-based Sinclair, one of the largest television-station operators in the nation, had a net loss of $1.3 million, or 1 cent per share.In last year's second quarter, the company had a post-dividend net loss of $3.5 million, or 4 cents per share.
EXPLORE
August 22, 2011
Shannon Ward, owner of Sazor Financial Solutions, of Fallston, has expanded her business to include payroll. Sazor Financial Solutions was established in 2010 with the goal of helping small businesses better manage their financial records. As a student of the Universal Accounting Center's Professional Bookkeeper Program, and a Certified Quickbooks ProAdvisor, Ward is excited to be offering additional services to the business community. Ward's main focus is in helping businesses evaluate their financial standing and improve their returns.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2011
The city-owned Hilton Baltimore Convention Center Hotel performed better in its second full year of operation than in its first, but officials warned that the slow economic recovery means several more years could pass before it turns a profit. In terms of cash flow, the 757-room hotel on Pratt Street ended 2010 "slightly above break-even," with $9.7 million on hand at the end of the year, compared with $8.4 million at the beginning, according to a financial statement provided this month to the city's Board of Estimates.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2011
Numbers and art typically don't mix, but both were on exhibit at the American Visionary Art Museum Monday. The Baltimore museum hosted a one-day seminar with PNC Bank on what artists need to know to survive and thrive on the business side of their craft. About 35 painters, musicians, writers and other artists attended the free crash course on budgeting and cash flow. Aspiring writer Carita Ellis-Espola was among them, driving an hour and a half from Harrisburg, Pa., to pick up financial tips.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller | nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | April 8, 2010
Annapolis Mayor Joshua J. Cohen said Thursday the city plans to pursue a $10 million line of credit in order to make payroll and other expenses for the next few months as it struggles with a significant drop in revenues and a record budget deficit. Calling the move a "temporary measure to ease our short-term cash flow crunch," the proposed line of credit would allow the city to offset shortfalls until it receives property tax revenues in October. The three members of the city council's finance committee are co-sponsoring a resolution that they plan to introduce Monday night that would authorize the credit line, which the city last sought a quarter of a century ago. "The need for a line of credit underscores how tight money is," said Cohen, a Democrat.
BUSINESS
By Stephen L. Rosenstein | June 8, 2008
Monitoring cash flow is vital to the well-being of your business. Minor "hiccups" can be expected, but they also can be an early warning of larger problems ahead, especially if other indicators such as sales seem positive. Though critically important, monitoring and predicting cash flow is a matter of consistently following some common-sense financial management practices. The object is to make certain that more cash enters your business than exits. First, you need to translate sales into real money as quickly as possible.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | May 4, 2008
An employee buyout can lead to the best of times or the worst of times. The worst: A client of certified financial planner David Berman who accepted a buyout from a pharmaceutical company at 56 is struggling. He expected to land another job in six months, but a year and a half later still hasn't found one. He burned through his severance and the only money left is his retirement account. The best: "I've often seen a buyout provide a real kick in the pants for someone to make a career change they'd been contemplating anyway, or to relocate to another city they'd been considering before," said Berman, a principal of Berman McAleer Inc. in Timonium.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2011
The city-owned Hilton Baltimore Convention Center Hotel performed better in its second full year of operation than in its first, but officials warned that the slow economic recovery means several more years could pass before it turns a profit. In terms of cash flow, the 757-room hotel on Pratt Street ended 2010 "slightly above break-even," with $9.7 million on hand at the end of the year, compared with $8.4 million at the beginning, according to a financial statement provided this month to the city's Board of Estimates.
BUSINESS
By Stephen L. Rosenstein | December 2, 2007
Without a steady cash flow to cover expenses, your company can stumble quickly. The object is to make certain more cash enters your business than exits your bank account. You need to translate sales into real money as quickly as possible. Slow or nonpaying customers and unexpected expenses are your worst cash-flow problems. One way to shift cash your way is to ask for all or a portion of payment up front. Accepting credit-card payments can also be helpful. You should manage "receivables" closely.
BUSINESS
By STEPHEN L. ROSENSTEIN | March 9, 2008
Leasing equipment, vehicles or furniture is an attractive option for many small businesses because it can provide more benefits than outright purchase. It depends on the type of equipment, your expected needs and the lease arrangement. Equipment lease payments may be lower than the monthly costs to pay for the assets. But over the life of the lease, you will generally end up spending more than the equipment's purchase price. The result can help improve the cash flow of a business. One drawback in leasing is the loss of the tax benefits that accrue from the capital depreciation of major items such as buildings, major equipment, computers and vehicles.
BUSINESS
By Stephen L. Rosenstein | December 2, 2007
Without a steady cash flow to cover expenses, your company can stumble quickly. The object is to make certain more cash enters your business than exits your bank account. You need to translate sales into real money as quickly as possible. Slow or nonpaying customers and unexpected expenses are your worst cash-flow problems. One way to shift cash your way is to ask for all or a portion of payment up front. Accepting credit-card payments can also be helpful. You should manage "receivables" closely.
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