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By Chicago Tribune | December 1, 1990
CHICAGO -- U.S. farmers could be cultivating a lucrative cash crop for oils, clothes, rope and paper, if only the U.S. government would legalize it, according to a physicist at Argonne National Laboratory.And if other Americans want to smoke what's left, that's fine with Mike Rosing too.The crop, hemp, the plant from which marijuana is derived, has been outlawed in the United States since 1937. But in these times of recession talk, Mr. Rosing said with a smile, no source of income should be overlooked.
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NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | November 11, 2005
With 40 acres of ginseng sprouting on his Garrett County farm, Larry Harding has learned to wait and worry. Rodents and deer can eat his crop. Fungal diseases can attack it. The plants take eight years to produce the twisted, gnarly roots that Harding considers the right size and shape. Although thefts are infrequent, Harding still worries constantly that a rustler will sneak into his fields at night and steal his herbs. "You've got to sleep sometime, and they don't sleep when they're thieving," said Harding, Maryland's leading ginseng producer.
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NEWS
By Cox News Service | September 2, 1999
GREENVILLE, N.C. -- Ephraigm Smith is a bear of a man, with big, meaty hands worn rough, dirt on them that no amount of soap will remove.The farmer's hands are his tools, and they show their use.He comes from a long line of men and women who drew their living from the land. His ancestors have been in Pitt County since the mid-1700s, first tapping vast tracts of pine trees for their valuable turpentine, then cultivating row crops such as cotton and corn and soybeans on the many acres in the Chicod community.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2004
Anne Arundel County should target its agricultural preservation efforts at land owned by longtime farming families and give those families more options for using the land once it is preserved, a panel of farmers and farm experts recommended last week. Such measures would help the county preserve its farming industry, instead of just preserving open land, said Jeff Opel, the chairman of the panel. "We've done a very good job of preserving our land base, but it's equally important to preserve the farmer," said Opel, who is also director of the county's soil conservation district.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | October 2, 1992
Never again! Except in Cambodia, and Kurdistan, an Somalia, and Bosnia.Ross Perot is the running gag of this show.So many industries have left Baltimore or downsized here that nobody knows what makes the region run. We are all selling each other jeans and hamburgers.The state of Maryland still uses Blue Cross/Shield, so it must be OK.Marijuana is a cash crop in depressed Western Maryland, but state experts prefer an economy out there based on golf and white water rafting.
NEWS
July 16, 1992
With some of the state's most productive corn and hay crops, and a beautiful topiary garden that draws tourists from out of state, Harford County is home to many residents skilled at coaxing things from the earth. Some of these green-thumbs, however, would rather you didn't know their identities. They're growing marijuana.Harford County is the state leader in this cash crop -- an ignominious honor, for sure. "We have sat back and scratched our heads for years over that one. Why Harford County?"
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | November 11, 2005
With 40 acres of ginseng sprouting on his Garrett County farm, Larry Harding has learned to wait and worry. Rodents and deer can eat his crop. Fungal diseases can attack it. The plants take eight years to produce the twisted, gnarly roots that Harding considers the right size and shape. Although thefts are infrequent, Harding still worries constantly that a rustler will sneak into his fields at night and steal his herbs. "You've got to sleep sometime, and they don't sleep when they're thieving," said Harding, Maryland's leading ginseng producer.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2004
Anne Arundel County should target its agricultural preservation efforts at land owned by longtime farming families and give those families more options for using the land once it is preserved, a panel of farmers and farm experts recommended last week. Such measures would help the county preserve its farming industry, instead of just preserving open land, said Jeff Opel, the chairman of the panel. "We've done a very good job of preserving our land base, but it's equally important to preserve the farmer," said Opel, who is also director of the county's soil conservation district.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2004
Anne Arundel County should target its agricultural preservation efforts at land owned by longtime farming families and give those families more options for using the land once it is preserved, a panel of farmers and farm experts recommended last week. Such measures would help the county preserve its farming industry instead of just preserving open land, said Jeff Opel, chairman of the panel. "We've done a very good job of preserving our land base, but it's equally important to preserve the farmer," said Opel, director of the county's soil conservation district.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | February 24, 1991
One of the anomalies of the county's financial crunch is that while more than 200 employees may have to be laid off soon, the county has millions to spend on farmland preservation.By law, the $13 million the county has saved to acquire the development rights for rural land can be used only for that purpose.In the last 16 months, the success of the preservation program led some council members to the uneasy perception that it is creating millionaires in a time of recession and potential layoffs.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2004
Anne Arundel County should target its agricultural preservation efforts at land owned by longtime farming families and give those families more options for using the land once it is preserved, a panel of farmers and farm experts recommended last week. Such measures would help the county preserve its farming industry instead of just preserving open land, said Jeff Opel, chairman of the panel. "We've done a very good job of preserving our land base, but it's equally important to preserve the farmer," said Opel, director of the county's soil conservation district.
NEWS
By Ewart Rouse and Ewart Rouse,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 10, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - Standing on the edge of his expansive garden, Umberto Bifulco bent over, curled his long fingers around a cluster of broad-leaved, deep-rooted dandelions, and pulled. "Look at it," he said excitedly, holding up the vegetable. "Look how beautiful it is. I want you to taste it. I'm going to eat it, too. Don't be afraid." Bifulco sliced off the roots with a pocketknife, brushed off the dirt, handed over a stalk, and bit into another. "Now, isn't that good?" Bifulco prompted.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 3, 2001
SAN JOSE, Calif. - A steady hum floats through the locked, windowless door in this city's sleek but sleepy downtown. Uniformed guards abound, and bulletproof glass shields employees who hold the key. It's a security setup befitting a bank, and in many ways the climate-controlled expanse at AboveNet Communications Inc. is a vault. Inside, hundreds of buzzing, power-thirsty computer servers connect the buying public to the Web sites of online auction house eBay and its e-commerce brethren.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2000
It was 1987, and the beloved patriarch of the Iager farming family had died. His body still lay in a Howard County funeral home awaiting burial when his sons got a call from a stranger - the first of dozens to come. Eugene Iager can recite the usual script: Hello, Mr. Iager. Could we talk? Could we have an hour of your time, maybe meet so you can tell us about your plans for your land? For a decade, Iager gave the same two-word response to these eager builders and developers: "Not interested."
NEWS
By Cox News Service | September 2, 1999
GREENVILLE, N.C. -- Ephraigm Smith is a bear of a man, with big, meaty hands worn rough, dirt on them that no amount of soap will remove.The farmer's hands are his tools, and they show their use.He comes from a long line of men and women who drew their living from the land. His ancestors have been in Pitt County since the mid-1700s, first tapping vast tracts of pine trees for their valuable turpentine, then cultivating row crops such as cotton and corn and soybeans on the many acres in the Chicod community.
NEWS
By Kirk Semple and Kirk Semple,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 26, 1998
PITAYO, Colombia -- Eight people were murdered last year in this small mountain village of Paez Indians; at least six of the deaths are blamed on a flower.Townspeople also tell of the advent of prostitution and the rape of more than a dozen girls, all in the past few years. Same cause: "la flor."So it has gone since the beginning of the decade when this reservation of 5,200 residents, wedged high in the Andes of southwest Colombia, saw the arrival of the opium poppy -- the source of heroin -- and with it the disintegration of a community.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 23, 1994
TILLSONBURG, Ontario -- Joe Strobel dreams marijuana dreams.It's not what you think.In Mr. Strobel's dream, the tobacco fields sloping up from the north shore of Lake Erie -- his fields and those of his neighbors -- are patched with dense stands of cannabis sativa ruffling in the wind. And it's all legal.The Canadian government is poised to make Mr. Strobel's dream come true, perhaps as early as this summer.For Mr. Strobel's marijuana -- or hemp, as he prefers to call it -- would be so low in tetrahydrocanna binol, or THC, the active ingredient in pot, that no one could get high smoking it. Instead, Mr. Strobel and the 11 other Ontario farmers in his consortium plan to sell their hemp fiber for processing into paper, rope, building materials and maybe even shirts and caps.
SPORTS
By Tom Keegan and Tom Keegan,Sun Staff Writer | May 18, 1994
For some reason, many of the same people who have no problem with Madonna's earning $60 million in one year for personifying an image not quite in line with that you would hope your daughter projects get bent way out of shape when major-league baseball players are paid in the millions.The thinking is that only Ivy League graduates, CEOs and movie stars are entitled to the riches. Never mind that the free market dictates player salaries, baseball is a game, the thinking goes, and games should be played only for fun.For those who can't stop feeling bitter about ballplayers striking it rich, ask yourself one question and see if that doesn't work.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | June 25, 1997
HUGHESVILLE -- Steven Walter's father and uncles were only boys in those years when they began chopping the trees, pulling out the stumps with horses and hoes, and sawing the timber into boards and beams.Then they tilled the cleared land, built barns and settled into the arduous annual cycle of planting, cutting, hanging, curing and stripping the aromatic four-foot leaves that slowly turn from green to gold.Thus was a tobacco farm built from a forest in the 1930s; and at the age of 36, Walter now keeps the cycle going as he awaits the arrival of the next generation -- his first child, due on the Fourth of July.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 23, 1994
TILLSONBURG, Ontario -- Joe Strobel dreams marijuana dreams.It's not what you think.In Mr. Strobel's dream, the tobacco fields sloping up from the north shore of Lake Erie -- his fields and those of his neighbors -- are patched with dense stands of cannabis sativa ruffling in the wind. And it's all legal.The Canadian government is poised to make Mr. Strobel's dream come true, perhaps as early as this summer.For Mr. Strobel's marijuana -- or hemp, as he prefers to call it -- would be so low in tetrahydrocanna binol, or THC, the active ingredient in pot, that no one could get high smoking it. Instead, Mr. Strobel and the 11 other Ontario farmers in his consortium plan to sell their hemp fiber for processing into paper, rope, building materials and maybe even shirts and caps.
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