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By SUZANNE WOOTON | December 20, 1992
Tucked away in one of the state's most thoughtful, yet remarkably untimely reports, is a two-paragraph admonishment about the inherent dangers of the state's sacred cash cow -- the Maryland lottery.''Its role as a state revenue source should be allowed to diminish, and its social impacts should be studied,'' warned the Maryland Commission on State Taxes and Tax Structure two years ago in its sweeping recommendations about reforming the way the state raises its money.Predictably, that advice was ignored along with most of the commission's other recommendations.
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NEWS
November 29, 2012
Much attention has been given to the speed camera issue as reported by The Sun. Readers have become enlightened about both the positive and negative regarding their use or misuse and the revenue stream that begins with ticket issuance. One of the pro-camera items is their use as a deterrent toward speeding in school zones. A writer asked about when schools are not in session and the camera still clicks away, such as in summer months. Another pro-camera argument is that it frees up police forces from sitting idly in their patrol cars with their radar devices.
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SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | November 25, 1990
The National Football League is a fat, arrogant cash cow that is convinced nothing can go wrong - not unlike Rome before the fall. The NFL certainly isn't going to fall any time soon, if ever. But it could stand to stop strutting and crowing and take stock. There are more than a few problems inside the house.Outward appearances are all sweet peaches and buttermilk. The demand for tickets has never been greater. Television ratings shame those for other sports. Cities, such as ours, are down on their knees clamoring for teams.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2012
Federal prosecutors in August 2012 announced that two men, Bryan Eammon Williams and Lawrence Lee Hayes, had been sentenced to 11 years and 15 years respectively for their roles in a cocaine distribution conspiracy. The details of the case are rather fascinating if you keep reading, and even moreso if you start connecting dots.  The press release about Hayes' and Williams' sentences includes a canned quote from Ava Cooper-Davis, the special agent in charge of the Drug Enforcement Administration's Washington field office, calling the case "drug interdiction at its best.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and By Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 20, 2001
BEIJING - At first glance, there's little to distinguish the house of Liu Xiulan from the thousands of brick and stone farmhouses that dot the parched mountainsides north of China's capital. Study the walls more closely, though, and some of the bricks stand out - the ones engraved with Chinese characters and dated 1578. Before they supported Liu's gray tile roof, these bricks belonged to the Great Wall. Liu lives a two-hour drive north of Beijing and a short walk from a section of the Great Wall that dates to the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644)
BUSINESS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | May 7, 2006
When Maurine Davis was planning a vacation to England and Italy from her home in Des Moines, Iowa, earlier this year, she found that trading the uncomfortable squeeze of the economy cabin for a nicer seat upfront on the airplane would cost her $6,600. She chose instead to hop a Northwest Airlines plane to Washington Dulles International Airport, where she boarded an upstart discount carrier called MAXjet Airways that promised creature comforts and a sale price under $1,000. "My son was looking online for me, and when he said MAXjet, I said who?"
EXPLORE
December 22, 2011
Editor: I am not surprised to see that the Harford County Teachers Union is stopping their members from getting a much deserved bonus. Once again they show that the union leadership is only interested in how they can get and control the money. I was glad to see that the non-member teachers were awarded their bonuses. When will union members realize that the union leaders are only interested in being a cash cow for the Democratic Party and President Odrama. The teachers would be much better off to resign their membership, keep the money they waste on union dues and get the bonus they deserve.
NEWS
November 29, 2012
Much attention has been given to the speed camera issue as reported by The Sun. Readers have become enlightened about both the positive and negative regarding their use or misuse and the revenue stream that begins with ticket issuance. One of the pro-camera items is their use as a deterrent toward speeding in school zones. A writer asked about when schools are not in session and the camera still clicks away, such as in summer months. Another pro-camera argument is that it frees up police forces from sitting idly in their patrol cars with their radar devices.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff Writer | November 22, 1995
Dundalk won't have Brian Wilson to kick it around anymore.The acerbic morning deejay, whose persistent Dundalk-bashing infuriated residents of the blue-collar Baltimore suburb, is off the air.Ardie Gregory, vice president and general manager of WOCT-FM (104.3), confirmed yesterday that Mr. Wilson no longer works for her station. She declined any further comment, citing "unresolved contractual issues."Mr. Wilson was hired just three months ago, after abruptly giving up his talk-radio slot on WCBM.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2012
Federal prosecutors in August 2012 announced that two men, Bryan Eammon Williams and Lawrence Lee Hayes, had been sentenced to 11 years and 15 years respectively for their roles in a cocaine distribution conspiracy. The details of the case are rather fascinating if you keep reading, and even moreso if you start connecting dots.  The press release about Hayes' and Williams' sentences includes a canned quote from Ava Cooper-Davis, the special agent in charge of the Drug Enforcement Administration's Washington field office, calling the case "drug interdiction at its best.
EXPLORE
December 22, 2011
Editor: I am not surprised to see that the Harford County Teachers Union is stopping their members from getting a much deserved bonus. Once again they show that the union leadership is only interested in how they can get and control the money. I was glad to see that the non-member teachers were awarded their bonuses. When will union members realize that the union leaders are only interested in being a cash cow for the Democratic Party and President Odrama. The teachers would be much better off to resign their membership, keep the money they waste on union dues and get the bonus they deserve.
NEWS
December 15, 2010
In the tony village of Potomac, one of Montgomery County's most exclusive enclaves, the average home sells for about $1 million, but it's not hard to find properties that list for a great deal more money. People living there generally earn more than those who live elsewhere in the county, but they also pay much more in taxes, too. Yet when Montgomery County was struggling to pay for government services during the recession that hit eight years ago and raised property taxes at a rate higher than that of inflation (where it's normally capped by the county's charter)
NEWS
By David Zurawik and Chris Kaltenbach and David Zurawik and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN REPORTERS | April 3, 2008
For decades, local TV stations in cities like Baltimore were cash cows for the companies that owned them. Even though one or two stations with the most popular anchors often came to dominate each market, everybody made money. Local TV was that surefire a business - even for last-place and poorly managed stations. But not today. More and more, the dominant story line for local TV news is one filled with talk of cutbacks, layoffs, lowered expectations and an urgent need to find new ways of doing business and winning viewers.
NEWS
By Bay Fang and Bay Fang,Chicago Tribune | March 11, 2007
WASHINGTON --The United Nations Development Programme office in Pyongyang, North Korea, sits in a Soviet-style compound. Like clockwork, a North Korean official wearing a standard-issue dark windbreaker and slacks would come to the door each business day. He would take a manila envelope stuffed with cash -- a healthy portion of the U.N.'s disbursements for aid projects in the country -- and leave without ever providing receipts. According to sources at the U.N., this went on for years, resulting in the transfer of up to $150 million in hard foreign currency to the Kim Jong Il government at a time when the United States was trying to keep the North Korean government from receiving hard currency as part of its sanctions against the Kim regime.
BUSINESS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | May 7, 2006
When Maurine Davis was planning a vacation to England and Italy from her home in Des Moines, Iowa, earlier this year, she found that trading the uncomfortable squeeze of the economy cabin for a nicer seat upfront on the airplane would cost her $6,600. She chose instead to hop a Northwest Airlines plane to Washington Dulles International Airport, where she boarded an upstart discount carrier called MAXjet Airways that promised creature comforts and a sale price under $1,000. "My son was looking online for me, and when he said MAXjet, I said who?"
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2005
Over the past two weeks, the 180 children in Leith Walk Elementary School's summer program have learned a lot about crabs. Six-year-old Taylor Snead learned that "crabs have `pinchers,' and they might pinch really, really, really hard." Tania Jones, 5, now knows that "some of them live in the ocean, and some of them live in their homes on the land." Along the way, there has been another lesson for these children: That their summer program - which provides four hours of academics in the morning and four hours of recreation in the afternoon - is not to be taken for granted.
FEATURES
By VIDA ROBERTS and VIDA ROBERTS,SUN FASHION EDITOR | August 24, 1997
Small pleasuresMen's skivvies are the cash cow -- bull if you will -- for many top designer labels. Calvin Klein, Versace and now Ralph Lauren package sex and buff boy toys in their ad campaigns.So how is a company like Fruit of the Loom, with its flabby, old fruit-guy spokesmodels, going to get attention? The top producer of men's and boys' briefs miniaturized basic whities to one-twelfth their normal size and inserted 1.25 million of them into four-page ads that will run in the Sept. 4 issue of Rolling Stone magazine.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | October 13, 1998
Camden Yards is the envy of cities across America. Its sports teams should be, too.The baseball stadium is a cash cow. The football stadium is a cash cow. The Orioles and Ravens possess the resources to compete at the highest levels.Indeed, fans in Baltimore should be among the most satisfied in the country, luxuriating in spectacular facilities, cheering for perennial contenders.Yet, many are frustrated, alienated, even angry.The fans do their part, supporting the Orioles and Ravens in record numbers.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2005
The cows came home last night. In commercials on the four major broadcast networks, a band of bovines broke into a house, trashed the place, climbed the stairs and tipped a poor fellow out of his bed. And then the mastermind behind the stealth campaign that has mystified Marylanders for the last month was revealed: It's, as suspected, the Maryland Lottery. What, you were expecting McDonald's? The lottery's advertising agency, Eisner Communications of Baltimore, created the BovineUnite.
NEWS
August 11, 2002
IT'S EASY TO understand why the troubled Port Discovery children's museum would want to move to a more visible location near the National Aquarium. But should it then be allowed to hold on to its current home - which it leases from the city for $1 a year - and make a huge profit by leasing it to some other user? A fierce controversy has erupted over this question. The children's museum's boosters argue that this would resolve its long-term financial problems. Critics contend that such an arrangement would amount to a gargantuan taxpayer subsidy over the 96 remaining years of the lease.
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