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NEWS
By SCOTT MILLS | February 22, 1998
In 1990, Congress passed the Americans with Disabilities Act. The ADA was intended to create a level playing field for people with disabilities by ensuring them equal opportunity in employment and equal access to places of public accommodation.The recent decision by an Oregon federal court to exempt disabled golfer Casey Martin from the Professional Golfers Association's no-cart rule has stretched the application of the ADA far beyond the original intent of Congress. Far from ensuring a level playing field, the court has given Martin a free ride over the same courses on which other PGA players must walk.
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SPORTS
By THOMAS BONK and THOMAS BONK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 8, 2005
At least he will have more time to follow college football now, mainly the Oregon Ducks in his hometown of Eugene, or Stanford, where he went to school and earned a degree in economics 10 years ago. What Casey Martin is leaving out of his life is playing the pro golf tour, which is really all he ever wanted to do, withered leg and all, through drawn-out legal battles, a faceoff with golf's establishment, unwanted appearances in the court of public opinion...
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 17, 1998
SAN FRANCISCO -- King Martin can still remember the afternoons when his two sons, Cameron and Casey, would go out to the backyard of the family's home in Oregon and set up a miniature golf course using cut-down clubs and Whiffle balls."
TOPIC
By Beth A. Haller | June 10, 2001
THE REAL STORY is about a man, who happens to have a disability, trying to pursue his profession. But much of that has been pushed aside by our national obsession with sports. It's simple: Casey Martin, a person with a disability, is receiving the accommodation he needs, a golf cart, to participate in a public event, PGA competition. The Supreme Court decision of May 29 has garnered much media attention, but some of the stories and columns gloss over the true news in the decision - maintaining the legal rights of all Americans with disabilities.
TOPIC
By Beth A. Haller | June 10, 2001
THE REAL STORY is about a man, who happens to have a disability, trying to pursue his profession. But much of that has been pushed aside by our national obsession with sports. It's simple: Casey Martin, a person with a disability, is receiving the accommodation he needs, a golf cart, to participate in a public event, PGA competition. The Supreme Court decision of May 29 has garnered much media attention, but some of the stories and columns gloss over the true news in the decision - maintaining the legal rights of all Americans with disabilities.
SPORTS
By THOMAS BONK and THOMAS BONK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 8, 2005
At least he will have more time to follow college football now, mainly the Oregon Ducks in his hometown of Eugene, or Stanford, where he went to school and earned a degree in economics 10 years ago. What Casey Martin is leaving out of his life is playing the pro golf tour, which is really all he ever wanted to do, withered leg and all, through drawn-out legal battles, a faceoff with golf's establishment, unwanted appearances in the court of public opinion...
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | June 18, 1998
In most years, the story of the U.S. Open is told on television as a parable of a man against an unforgiving golf course, but the first two rounds of this year's tournament may very well be a man and his cart against a course and tradition.After he challenged the PGA Tour in court for the right to ride in a cart around a course as he competed, then qualified for the U.S. Open, you had to figure that Casey Martin would become a centerpiece of coverage.You won't be disappointed."We'll cover his opening shot [today]
NEWS
By DON MARKUS and DON MARKUS,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1998
One month after winning his first professional golf tournament, Casey Martin scored the biggest victory of his career - the right to use a golf cart during competition.After deliberating for only three hours, U.S. Magistrate Thomas Coffin ruled in favor of Martin, a 25-year-old golfer who suffers from a degenerative circulatory condition in his right leg, in his lawsuit against the PGA Tour. This was apparently the first case invoking federal disabilities laws to compete in a major sport.
NEWS
By Larry Atkins | April 18, 2001
PHILADELPHIA -- No doubt about it: Tiger Woods' feat of winning four straight major golf tournaments was a great achievement. But many commentators have compared the "Tiger Slam" to other great sports feats such as Joe DiMaggio's 56-game hitting streak, Wilt Chamberlain scoring 100 points in one game and Carl Lewis' Olympic triumphs. Many writers have said that Tiger Woods should be considered among the greatest athletes of all time, along with Muhammad Ali, Babe Ruth and Michael Jordan.
SPORTS
By Steven Kivinski and Don Markus | June 8, 1998
POTOMAC -- Stuart Appleby was standing outside the interview tent at the TPC at Avenel yesterday evening, signing hats, programs, balls and anything else his fans would extend to him, when he nearly mistook Scott Hoch as an autograph-seeker."
NEWS
By Larry Atkins | April 18, 2001
PHILADELPHIA -- No doubt about it: Tiger Woods' feat of winning four straight major golf tournaments was a great achievement. But many commentators have compared the "Tiger Slam" to other great sports feats such as Joe DiMaggio's 56-game hitting streak, Wilt Chamberlain scoring 100 points in one game and Carl Lewis' Olympic triumphs. Many writers have said that Tiger Woods should be considered among the greatest athletes of all time, along with Muhammad Ali, Babe Ruth and Michael Jordan.
SPORTS
By Sam Borden and Sam Borden,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2000
POTOMAC - Casey Martin weaved in and out of a gridlocked group of leaders yesterday at the Kemper Insurance Open, maneuvering through the third round with a 4-under-par 67. Martin, who uses a cart because of a painful leg condition, enters the fourth round at 6-under 206, four shots off the steady pace of Steve Lowery, who has led after all three rounds. There are 17 players within five shots of the lead, including Franklin Langham and Paul Stankowski at 203, Justin Leonard and Tom Scherrer at 204, and Tim Herron and Stewart Cink at 206. Martin began his third round just 16 hours after he finished his rain-delayed second one. The former teammate of Tiger Woods couldn't sleep off all of the disappointment of a back-nine 40 Friday night, though, and came out slowly, double-bogeying the par-4 fourth hole.
SPORTS
By Sam Borden and Sam Borden,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2000
POTOMAC - Leading up to the first round of the Kemper Insurance Open, the talk among the players was of the rain that soaked the course last weekend. The TPC at Avenel seemed to be playing longer than its 7,005-yard length, and players were hitting shots during practice rounds that "were going nowhere," as Steve Elkington put it. The consensus was that players who hit the ball long and high - like Ernie Els, John Daly and Hank Kuehne - would be favored because their shots wouldn't be hampered by the sopping fairways.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | March 14, 2000
Opinion: A Final Four prediction (with eyes closed, as always): Temple, Michigan State, Stanford and St. John's. That's right, Temple over Duke in the East Regional final. And Michigan State over Stanford in the championship game. Fact: This makes it three years in a row that one of Baltimore's five Division I teams hasn't reached the NCAA tournament. Opinion: If the seedings hold in the Maryland Terrapins' draw, UCLA would make a much, much tougher second-round opponent than Creighton was last year, but Iowa State, though obviously tough, is a Johnny-come-lately and thus the kind of high seed you want to play in the Sweet 16. Fact: After former Maryland star Steve Francis lost a tooth in an on-court collision in an NBA game last week, a fan found the tooth and put it up for auction on an Internet site.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | June 18, 1998
In most years, the story of the U.S. Open is told on television as a parable of a man against an unforgiving golf course, but the first two rounds of this year's tournament may very well be a man and his cart against a course and tradition.After he challenged the PGA Tour in court for the right to ride in a cart around a course as he competed, then qualified for the U.S. Open, you had to figure that Casey Martin would become a centerpiece of coverage.You won't be disappointed."We'll cover his opening shot [today]
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 17, 1998
SAN FRANCISCO -- King Martin can still remember the afternoons when his two sons, Cameron and Casey, would go out to the backyard of the family's home in Oregon and set up a miniature golf course using cut-down clubs and Whiffle balls."
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | March 14, 2000
Opinion: A Final Four prediction (with eyes closed, as always): Temple, Michigan State, Stanford and St. John's. That's right, Temple over Duke in the East Regional final. And Michigan State over Stanford in the championship game. Fact: This makes it three years in a row that one of Baltimore's five Division I teams hasn't reached the NCAA tournament. Opinion: If the seedings hold in the Maryland Terrapins' draw, UCLA would make a much, much tougher second-round opponent than Creighton was last year, but Iowa State, though obviously tough, is a Johnny-come-lately and thus the kind of high seed you want to play in the Sweet 16. Fact: After former Maryland star Steve Francis lost a tooth in an on-court collision in an NBA game last week, a fan found the tooth and put it up for auction on an Internet site.
SPORTS
By Sam Borden and Sam Borden,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2000
POTOMAC - Casey Martin weaved in and out of a gridlocked group of leaders yesterday at the Kemper Insurance Open, maneuvering through the third round with a 4-under-par 67. Martin, who uses a cart because of a painful leg condition, enters the fourth round at 6-under 206, four shots off the steady pace of Steve Lowery, who has led after all three rounds. There are 17 players within five shots of the lead, including Franklin Langham and Paul Stankowski at 203, Justin Leonard and Tom Scherrer at 204, and Tim Herron and Stewart Cink at 206. Martin began his third round just 16 hours after he finished his rain-delayed second one. The former teammate of Tiger Woods couldn't sleep off all of the disappointment of a back-nine 40 Friday night, though, and came out slowly, double-bogeying the par-4 fourth hole.
SPORTS
By Steven Kivinski and Don Markus | June 8, 1998
POTOMAC -- Stuart Appleby was standing outside the interview tent at the TPC at Avenel yesterday evening, signing hats, programs, balls and anything else his fans would extend to him, when he nearly mistook Scott Hoch as an autograph-seeker."
NEWS
By SCOTT MILLS | February 22, 1998
In 1990, Congress passed the Americans with Disabilities Act. The ADA was intended to create a level playing field for people with disabilities by ensuring them equal opportunity in employment and equal access to places of public accommodation.The recent decision by an Oregon federal court to exempt disabled golfer Casey Martin from the Professional Golfers Association's no-cart rule has stretched the application of the ADA far beyond the original intent of Congress. Far from ensuring a level playing field, the court has given Martin a free ride over the same courses on which other PGA players must walk.
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