Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCasey Foundation
IN THE NEWS

Casey Foundation

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2012
About 30 foster children in Baltimore stand to lose their social workers — for some the one constant in lives prone to turmoil — as the Annie E. Casey Foundation begins a new mission intended to extend its reach. The Baltimore-based foundation will close its Casey Family Services, a 36-year-old program that oversees the care of 400 foster children in seven states. Casey says the move will free up $18 million to $20 million a year to help increase adoptions and help other organizations that assist foster children.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 22, 2014
The Baltimore-based Annie E. Casey Foundation is out with its 25th Kids Count data book, measuring the wellbeing of children nationwide across a variety of health, economic, educational and community measures. In some ways, kids are much better off than they were in 1990, when the first book was published, and in some ways they are faring worse. For the good, we can credit a number of wise public policy efforts over the last generation, and for the ill, we can blame macroeconomic and social changes for which we have been unable - or unwilling - to mount a policy response.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 19, 1994
When the Annie E. Casey Foundation moved to Baltimore late last month, it instantly became the city's largest charity with its $1 billion asset base and $67 million in grants this year. There was little fanfare, yet the foundation has made a grand entrance by doing a spectacular modernization of its new headquarters building at Mount Vernon Place.The $2.2 million modernization is now complete. A nondescript 29-year-old building at St. Paul and Monument streets has been reborn as a light-filled structure.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Hall of Famer Brooks Robinson has been through a lot over the past several years, but he clearly hasn't lost his sense of humor. During a question-and-answer session before joining NBC Sports broadcaster Bob Costas for a fundraiser at Caves Valley Golf Club in Owings Mills to benefit the Casey Cares Foundation on Friday night, the legendary third baseman was asked whether there was one play during his career that he wished had been subject to...
NEWS
July 23, 2012
When your life is already in chaos, more chaos is likely to follow. But theAnnie E. Casey Foundationsays it won't let that happen to the children affected by its decision to close Casey Family Services this year ("Casey foundation ends foster care program," July 16). Given the foundation's outstanding record of serving the most vulnerable children over the last 36 years, I trust it will do everything possible to maintain stability for the kids in its program Casey's decision to remain committed to increasing adoption through increased awareness, education and technical assistance is laudable.
FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2013
Unimpressed with the elementary school in her Baltimore neighborhood, Bobbi Macdonald set out to create her own. She founded the City Neighborhoods Foundation in 2003, the year her oldest daughter started kindergarten and the state of Maryland began allowing charter schools. Ten years later, the nonprofit is running three schools: City Neighbors Charter School, City Neighbors Hamilton and City Neighbors High School. All are known for student engagement and attendance rates that top 90 percent.
NEWS
May 8, 1999
The Annie E. Casey Foundation is seeking applications for a fifth round of annual grants to support direct services to disadvantaged children and families in Baltimore City.The new grants, to range from $2,000 to $20,000 over one year, may be used for services such as health care, job training, violence prevention and education. The foundation expects to award 20 to 30 grants, with priority given to nonprofit organizations that have not previously received support from the direct services grant program.
NEWS
By Kalman R. Hettleman | September 18, 1995
THE BILLION-dollar Annie E. Casey Foundation, which located in Baltimore last year, has gone far out on a limb, for admirable reasons. Casey has put all its eggs in two high-risk baskets. First, it spends all its money on disadvantaged children. Second, it strives to achieve what it calls ''long-term comprehensive reform.''''We're not in the business,'' its executive director Doug Nelson says, ''of funding isolated programs. We're looking to change institutions, systems and environments.''Unfortunately, this courageous strategy has been flawed in its implementation and has so far produced disappointing results.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Sun Staff Writer | May 12, 1995
The Annie E. Casey Foundation is launching a $400,000 grants program today intended to make life a little better for Baltimore's disadvantaged children.The money will be disbursed to public agencies and nonprofit community organizations that provide health care, counseling, education, recreation or cultural enrichment to the city's deprived children."We are trying to have as an immediate impact as we can in improving outcomes for disadvantaged children and families in Baltimore," said Warren Simmons, director of Baltimore relations the foundation.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2001
The Annie E. Casey Foundation, a national organization that moved to Baltimore from Greenwich, Conn., in 1994, has compiled its first "Baltimore report" on the impact it has on the city. Although the group's officials call the report an internal document, they say the $3 billion foundation, the 13th-largest in the country, plans to distribute $7 million in Baltimore this year and expects its staff and operations to generate an additional $4.5 million for the city's economy. The organization has a national focus, but the man in charge of Baltimore grants says the city benefits by having the Casey Foundation here.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | March 5, 2014
How can Baltimoreans "strive for environmental justice for all citizens, particularly in the face of climate change?" That's one of the central questions to be tackled Thursday evening at a forum put on by the Friends of Maryland's Olmsted Parks & Landscapes .  A panel of three speakers will address "the Olmsted Challenge: Fostering Environmental Justice for a More Humane City. " Scheduled speakers are: Scot Spencer of the Annie E. Casey Foundation; Kristin Baja of the city's Office of Sustainability and Morgan Grove, a research scientist with the U.S. Forest Service.
NEWS
By Greg Couturier | January 1, 2014
The public outcry against the proposed construction of a $70-million juvenile jail in Baltimore City over the past several years - and the subsequent halting of that plan - sent a strong message to the governor, as well as juvenile services personnel statewide, that throwing money at the problem of juvenile crime just isn't going to cut it any more. Study after study has shown that incarcerating youth is not only incredibly costly - running about $80,000 per child per year, according to one estimate - but is actually detrimental to the rehabilitation of delinquent youth.
NEWS
November 6, 2013
Baltimore City Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's plan to use $10,000 in private foundation grants to fund a program designed to help low-income families stretch their food stamp benefits undoubtedly will help many of those struggling to make ends meet in the wake of this month's cuts to the federal Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program, also known as food stamps. Under the mayor's proposal, food stamp recipients will be able to get up to $10 extra a week if they use their EBT (electronic benefits transfer)
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2013
Maryland, which has seen improvements in childhood education and health in recent years, ranks No. 10 in the country for overall child well-being, according to a report released today by the Baltimore-based Annie E. Casey Foundation. Despite the high ranking for the second year in a row - Maryland was also 10th last year - children in the state have lost ground in some measures, including a growing number of them living in poverty since the recession, the foundation said. "We're a big believer in going to where the data takes you," said Patrick T. McCarthy, the foundation's president and CEO. "What the data shows on the economic well-being of children since 2005, Maryland and other states have slipped.
NEWS
June 11, 2013
The Casey Cares Foundation, http://www.caseycares.org , which provides uplifting and ongoing programs to critically ill children and their families, will host a Soccer Camp for a Cause June 21 from 7 to 9 p.m. at Ripken Stadium in Aberdeen. U.S. National Team Soccer Player Sergio Flores will host a two-hour soccer camp with all proceeds benefiting Casey Cares. The camp includes training and refreshments with the evening culminating in a kids versus parents game. The registration fee is $30 and participants can register at http://www.sergiossoccertraining.com .
FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2013
Unimpressed with the elementary school in her Baltimore neighborhood, Bobbi Macdonald set out to create her own. She founded the City Neighborhoods Foundation in 2003, the year her oldest daughter started kindergarten and the state of Maryland began allowing charter schools. Ten years later, the nonprofit is running three schools: City Neighbors Charter School, City Neighbors Hamilton and City Neighbors High School. All are known for student engagement and attendance rates that top 90 percent.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 23, 2004
The Annie E. Casey Foundation has a national reputation for helping disadvantaged families, but this year the Baltimore-based organization decided to award some of its most lucrative grants to nonprofit groups in its back yard. The Casey Foundation announced yesterday $3.5 million in grants to seven Maryland nonprofits that help low-income families. The groups, which will receive $500,000 each, can use the money as they wish over the next five years. "We like to say that children do well when families do well, and families do well when they are in supportive environments," said Miriam Shark, a senior associate who coordinates the program, known as Families Count.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | November 11, 1999
It took the Annie E. Casey Foundation half a century to reach $1.8 billion in assets. It took just one day to double that.The Baltimore philanthropy was a major benefactor of United Parcel Service Inc.'s initial public offering yesterday, the largest ever by a U.S. company. As investors rushed to snatch up shares, they drove up the value of the foundation's 41.6 million UPS shares by $1.75 billion."I didn't even work very hard today," joked Douglas W. Nelson, the foundation's president, during the first day of UPS trading on Wall Street.
NEWS
Lionel Foster | March 28, 2013
Five years ago, I thought I might have to leave Baltimore. Not because I wanted to but because I thought I needed to. It was 2008. Like many employers, Urbanite magazine, where I worked, was feeling the effects of the Great Recession, so I would soon have only half a job. The cut gave me a chance to rethink a few things. Just a few years earlier, I was at the London School of Economics sharing hallways with one of then-Libyan leader Muammar Gadhafi's sons and the crown prince of Norway.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2013
The rate of youth confinement in Maryland declined by nearly half over a 13-year period, outpacing the national average amid a "sea change" in the approach toward dealing with young people who break the law, according to a report released by a national youth advocacy group. From 1997 to 2010, the rate of youth incarceration dropped 37 percent, according to the Baltimore-based Annie E. Casey Foundation. The group noted that the United States leads the industrialized world in locking up young people, and said that the majority of incarcerated youths are held for nonviolent offenses such as truancy and low-level property crime.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.