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NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley sharply criticized Monday's U.S. Supreme Court ruling that certain corporations can cite religious grounds in refusing to pay for employee's contraception coverage.  The ruling, spurred by a lawsuit from Hobby Lobby, picks at one of the mandates of the Affordable Care Act. "No woman should have her health care decisions made by her boss. Period. This decision is wrong and a setback for women's health," the governor said in a tweet from his official account.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Four investigators from agencies outside Baltimore are working to determine who left a dead rat on the car windshield of an officer who was cooperating with prosecutors on a police brutality case. "We're going to go wherever that information takes us," Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts told a City Council committee last week. But an attorney for the whistle-blower officer, Detective Joseph Crystal, believes the efforts are "way too little, way too late" and said the investigation has taken so long that any officers implicated could not be disciplined because the statute of limitations has run out. In a rare move, the investigators working the case were pulled from outside of the city, according to Crystal's attorney, Nick Panteleakis.
HEALTH
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
The U.S. Supreme Court delivered a setback to the Obama administration Monday by ruling that the owners of private companies may refuse on religious grounds to offer employees insurance coverage for birth control. In a 5-4 ruling, the court's conservatives found that the requirement for contraceptive coverage tied to Obama's signature health care law ran afoul of a 1993 law expanding religious freedom. The decision, written by Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr., could have implications not only for secular companies but also religious organizations that are seeking a more complete exemption from the same requirement, including the Little Sisters of the Poor, a Catonsville-based Catholic charity.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
Baltimore City homicide detectives are looking for information about a shooting that was reported late Saturday in the Pigtown section of southwest Baltimore. About 11:45 p.m., police found a man with gunshot wounds to his chest and stomach. The victim was taken to an area hospital where he died of his injuries. Police did not identify the victim or provide any details about a motive or a suspect. Anyone with information is asked to call detectives at 410-396-2100. meredith.cohn@baltsun.com
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
Carroll County has agreed to pay a $40,000 penalty after a federally led inspection found the county had failed to properly protect its streams and waterways from polluted stormwater runoff. The Environmental Protection Agency announced earlier this week it had reached a settlement with the county, in which local officials agreed to pay the fine and correct federal water pollution violations found more than two years ago. The agency accused the county of failing to identify all the outfalls where stormwater runs into streams and rivers, not inspecting construction sites often enough, failing to check all county facilities for runoff controls and not providing a hotline for residents to report illegal discharges into storm drains.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
Baltimore's police civilian review board has concerns that a new effort to garner input from the board is not meaningful, an official told a City Council committee on Wednesday night.  After years of neglect, the department has been making strides to make the board more relevant, and recently announced that it would refer major use of force investigations, such as police-involved shootings and in-custody deaths, to the board after they were completed....
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
A lawsuit that accuses Creig Northrop Team, Long & Foster and several mortgage firms — including Long & Foster's Prosperity Mortgage Co. — of perpetrating mortgage fraud to ease home buying and selling could go before a jury, after the Maryland Court of Special Appeals reversed a lower court decision that found the statute of limitations had expired in the case. Creig Northrop Team sold more homes than any other real estate group in the state last year and was one of the top five in the country, according to a ranking by RealTrend.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
When Brian Stewart accused a local fraternity chapter at Morgan State University of discriminating against him for being gay late last year, the university stressed its commitment to diversity and began investigating. The two results, Stewart said this week, were that the Alpha Iota chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi was placed on probation for breaking university discrimination policies, and Stewart became an even bigger target of harassment  on the school's Baltimore campus. "I had figures - hidden by the shadows of a campus residence hall and the night sky -- yell threats to me intentionally calling me a [gay slur]
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Hip dysplasia may not be obvious in newborns, but the disorder may already be affecting babies' development. And the sooner parents and caregivers get an evaluation and treatment, the easier the fix, according to Dr. Andrew Abramowitz, a board-certified orthopedic surgeon at MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center who trained in pediatric orthopedics. What is pediatric hip dysplasia and how common is it? Hip dysplasia (developmental dysplasia of the hip or DDH) is a spectrum of abnormalities of the ball and socket joint of the hip. It occurs in one in every 1,000 live births.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
A Baltimore County police cadet stole drugs with a street value of more than $125,000 from the evidence vault at the department's headquarters and sold the drugs to two cousins, according to charging documents and police officials. Nicholas Michael Ishmael, 20, stole evidence related to at least 15 cases, including Oxycodone tablets, cocaine, morphine and other drugs, according to documents filed in District Court. After a "very lengthy investigation," Chief James W. Johnson said, the department is in the process of reviewing "every piece of evidence in our property evidence unit, and we intend to review all policies and procedures, and technologies and other techniques we can use to prevent this from happening in the future.
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