Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCases
IN THE NEWS

Cases

NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | April 3, 2014
TV host Glenn Beck and other stalwarts of the Christian right have attacked the recent blockbuster "Noah" as being "pro-animal" and unfaithful to the Bible. Well, yes and no. The film is both pro-animal and faithful to the Bible, at least to the Book of Genesis, our only source for the story of Noah. After all, Genesis 1:29 admonishes "Behold, I have given you every herb yielding seed which is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree that has seed-yielding fruit -- to you it shall be for food.
Advertisement
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
As the prime minster of Tunisia visits the White House on Friday to discuss his nation's move toward democracy, Maryland officials are pressing him to resolve an international kidnapping case they say speaks directly to whether the country will honor the rule of law. On Thursday, Maryland lawmakers called on Prime Minister Mehdi Jomaa - as well as President Barack Obama - to help two Prince George's County children caught in legal limbo in the...
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
After serving nearly 40 years in prison for a fatal shooting, Walter Lomax was released in 2006 amid questions about his trial. On Wednesday, he celebrated another milestone in his case, as prosecutors formally dropped the charges against him. Lomax, now 67, was sent to prison after being found guilty in the 1968 death of Robert L. Brewer, a night manager of a Brooklyn food market. A judge commuted his sentence eight years ago, citing problems with the evidence that led to his conviction.
NEWS
April 1, 2014
TV host Glenn Beck and other stalwarts of the Christian right have attacked the recent blockbuster "Noah" as being "pro-animal" and unfaithful to the Bible. Well, yes and no. The film is both pro-animal and faithful to the Bible, at least to the Book of Genesis, our only source for the story of Noah. After all, Genesis 1:29 admonishes "Behold, I have given you every herb yielding seed which is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree that has seed-yielding fruit - to you it shall be for food.
HEALTH
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2014
Lawyers have reached settlements in two pending class action cases alleging that former cardiologist Mark G. Midei performed unnecessary stent procedures at St. Joseph Medical Center, according to the hospital's former owner. Michael Romano, a spokesman for Catholic Health Initiatives, which used to own the Towson medical center, said the agreements will resolve the cases. "The parties executed the settlement to avoid the uncertainties and costs of continued litigation, and the settlement does not include any admission of liability," Romano said in a statement.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | March 30, 2014
Your right to swing your fist ends where my nose begins. That bit of live and let live wisdom, usually attributed -- some say misattributed -- to Oliver Wendell Holmes, provides a useful framework for considering a high profile case argued before the Supreme Court last week. The Affordable Care Act requires businesses, if they provide health insurance for their employees, to include contraceptive care in that coverage. Hobby Lobby, a chain of arts and crafts stores, and Conestoga Wood Specialties, a cabinet maker, say doing so would require them to violate their religious beliefs.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2014
A day after he was indicted on charges of third-degree aggravated assault for allegedly knocking his fiancée unconscious, Ravens running back Ray Rice and Janay Palmer got married. Ravens wide receiver Torrey Smith said today that he visited Rice and Palmer after Friday's ceremony and they are "in a good place. " "Everyone knows that we're tight. I'm tight with Ray, I'm tight with Janay. He is like a brother to me and she's like a sister to me and my wife as well," Smith said at his charity basketball game.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | March 28, 2014
The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments last week about the Affordable Care Act's requirement that employers of a certain size provide health care plans that pay for birth control for women. One of the plaintiffs, Hobby Lobby, a chain of craft stores in the South owned by a religious family, does not object to providing all forms of birth control. The family objects only to the IUD and two drugs commonly known as "the morning after pill" and "the week after pill" because, they believe, this device and these drugs would prevent a fertilized egg from attaching to a woman's uterus.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
COLLEGE PARK - A National Labor Relations Board official's decision that Northwestern's scholarship football players can vote to unionize is likely to accelerate the pace of NCAA reforms and "change the landscape" of college athletics, Maryland coach Randy Edsall said Thursday. "I think there are issues that we do have that need to be addressed," Edsall told reporters after practice. "With that ruling, I would think there are going to be some things that would change in terms of the structure.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
A Maryland school superintendent wouldn't ordinarily give local systems a pass on the requirement that public school students go to school for 180 days a year. But these have not been ordinary times. The seemingly endless winter, with its unusual number of snow days, has raised the specter of students going to school into the last week of June. On Tuesday, the State Board of Education offered a way out. As light snow fell outside their meeting room, board members voted to give Superintendent Lillian Lowery the authority to waive up to five days of school this year for public schools and two days for private schools.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.