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By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
A Baltimore jury failed to reach a verdict Tuesday in a high-profile murder case, leading a city judge to declare a mistrial in city prosecutors' first battle with what they say is a murderous group within the Black Guerrilla Family gang. A juror who declined to give her name said a majority on the panel had been leaning toward acquitting David Hunter, an alleged BGF member who was charged with murder in the broad-daylight killing of heroin dealer Henry Mills on Greenmount Avenue three years ago. At its heart, Hunter's case was a simple matter: The jury was asked to weigh the credibility of eyewitnesses to Mills' June 2011 death.
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NEWS
July 8, 2014
For Anthony Brown, the Hobby-Lobby decision seemed like manna from Heaven ( "Corporations trump people," June 30). Unable to run on Maryland's economy, jobs growth, tax rates, the health exchange rollout, his competence as an executive or the other issues central to this election, Mr. Brown and his special interest defenders are instead trying to frighten women for his own political gain. In his calculation, this is easier than, say, addressing the tens of thousands of women who have lost their jobs during his administration and, along with it, their employer-sponsored health insurance and the family planning and women's health services it covered.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
A week after a Baltimore County police cadet was accused of stealing drugs from the department's evidence room, prosecutors said they had dropped charges against a defendant in a case in which some of the drugs were seized. The trial of 50-year-old Joseph Thorn was scheduled to begin Thursday in Baltimore County District Court. But with the case seven years old and the drugs now missing, State's Attorney Scott D. Shellenberger said, "we decided the most reasonable thing to do was to dismiss the case.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
The U.S. Department of Education has opened an investigation into Morgan State University's handling of a reported sexual assault, as the number of colleges nationwide facing scrutiny for their response to sexual violence allegations grows. The investigation into Morgan State was opened June 26, according to a list made public Wednesday that now includes 66 other colleges nationwide. University spokesman Clint Coleman said the investigation involves the alleged sexual assault of a female student Feb. 28, an incident that she reported to the university on March 20. "We look forward to this investigation, and all we seek is justice," Coleman said.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Four investigators from agencies outside Baltimore are working to determine who left a dead rat on the car windshield of an officer who was cooperating with prosecutors on a police brutality case. "We're going to go wherever that information takes us," Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts told a City Council committee last week. But an attorney for the whistle-blower officer, Detective Joseph Crystal, believes the efforts are "way too little, way too late" and said the investigation has taken so long that any officers implicated could not be disciplined because the statute of limitations has run out. In a rare move, the investigators working the case were pulled from outside of the city, according to Crystal's attorney, Nick Panteleakis.
HEALTH
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
The U.S. Supreme Court delivered a setback to the Obama administration Monday by ruling that the owners of private companies may refuse on religious grounds to offer employees insurance coverage for birth control. In a 5-4 ruling, the court's conservatives found that the requirement for contraceptive coverage tied to Obama's signature health care law ran afoul of a 1993 law expanding religious freedom. The decision, written by Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr., could have implications not only for secular companies but also religious organizations that are seeking a more complete exemption from the same requirement, including the Little Sisters of the Poor, a Catonsville-based Catholic charity.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley sharply criticized Monday's U.S. Supreme Court ruling that certain corporations can cite religious grounds in refusing to pay for employee's contraception coverage.  The ruling, spurred by a lawsuit from Hobby Lobby, picks at one of the mandates of the Affordable Care Act. "No woman should have her health care decisions made by her boss. Period. This decision is wrong and a setback for women's health," the governor said in a tweet from his official account.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
Baltimore City homicide detectives are looking for information about a shooting that was reported late Saturday in the Pigtown section of southwest Baltimore. About 11:45 p.m., police found a man with gunshot wounds to his chest and stomach. The victim was taken to an area hospital where he died of his injuries. Police did not identify the victim or provide any details about a motive or a suspect. Anyone with information is asked to call detectives at 410-396-2100. meredith.cohn@baltsun.com
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
Carroll County has agreed to pay a $40,000 penalty after a federally led inspection found the county had failed to properly protect its streams and waterways from polluted stormwater runoff. The Environmental Protection Agency announced earlier this week it had reached a settlement with the county, in which local officials agreed to pay the fine and correct federal water pollution violations found more than two years ago. The agency accused the county of failing to identify all the outfalls where stormwater runs into streams and rivers, not inspecting construction sites often enough, failing to check all county facilities for runoff controls and not providing a hotline for residents to report illegal discharges into storm drains.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
Baltimore's police civilian review board has concerns that a new effort to garner input from the board is not meaningful, an official told a City Council committee on Wednesday night.  After years of neglect, the department has been making strides to make the board more relevant, and recently announced that it would refer major use of force investigations, such as police-involved shootings and in-custody deaths, to the board after they were completed....
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