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Cases Of Aids

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NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | October 23, 1994
A recent spurt in reporting has pushed the cumulative total of AIDS cases diagnosed in Maryland past the 10,000 mark.The total leaped by more than 1,100 cases -- a 13 percent increase -- between July 1 and Sept. 30, according to figures released by the state this month.The new data show that 10,140 cases of AIDS -- up from 8,976 in June -- have been diagnosed in Maryland since the start of the epidemic in 1981. Of those 10,140 people, 5,637 have died.The recent three-month increase in reported cases -- about equal to the number of new cases for all of 1990 -- stemmed mainly from a backlog that had gone unrecorded by the Baltimore City Health Department in early 1994, said state health officials.
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NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1999
Pledging to highlight the persistent epidemic of AIDS among African-Americans, the NAACP and several corporations will release a series of videos today on the disease's causes, preventions and treatments, NAACP officials said yesterday.The announcement of the release, which is expected at a news conference in Washington this morning, comes as the Baltimore-based National Association for the Advancement of Colored People begins its regularly scheduled quarterly board meeting at a Baltimore County hotel.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1995
Although the number of new AIDS cases in the United States dipped last year, the epidemic has shown no signs of abating in Baltimore and Maryland.With 2,951 people diagnosed in the state last fiscal year, Maryland had the fourth-highest rate of new cases in the nation, trailing New York, Florida and New Jersey, according to figures released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Two years ago, the state ranked eighth.In the fiscal year that ended June 30, about 59 new cases were diagnosed for every 100,000 people living in the state, compared with 45 per 100,000 a year earlier.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1998
They were single and unemployed, urban men and women who used drugs but didn't use condoms, people whose actions put them at higher risk for getting HIV than anyone else in America.Now the largest study of its kind has found that something as simple as talking can save their lives.They attended seven two-hour sessions that taught them how to correctly use condoms and how to talk with their partners.The participants also learned to understand what might be driving their risky sexual behavior and, in some cases, changed it.The results, reported in today's issue of the journal Science, offer encouragement for anyone who ever tried to teach safe sex.For up to a year after the sessions, the study's participants, including 700 Baltimore residents, doubled their regular use of condoms and posted lower rates of symptoms from sexually transmitted diseases, or STDs.
NEWS
By The Los Angeles Times | December 5, 1990
THE HOPE that the dreaded spread of acquired immune deficiency syndrome would be tightly contained has long gone by the boards.The authoritative Centers for Disease Control, in a new statement, reports that diagnosed cases of AIDS this year increased 29 percent for women as compared to 18 percent among men.That trend line is particularly alarming because one case of AIDS in a woman these days can have a double whammy: the AIDS baby. That growth curve of AIDS-born infants has sprung across the land.
NEWS
September 30, 1991
For the most part, when government mulls over the possibility of a needle-exchange program for controlling the spread of AIDS, the idea is almost immediately followed by the word "study," which has the effect of stopping any forward movement dead in its tracks.Although a steady stream of evidence now points to the conclusion that such programs do, in fact, reduce the transmission of the deadly HIV virus, a number of misperceptions still exist -- chief among them that giving addicts clean needles condones drug use, and that drug users deserve whatever happen to them as a consequence of their addiction.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | January 25, 1991
AIDS cases among Maryland women are rising steadily, particularly among intravenous drug users, according to preliminary figures from the state AIDS Administration.Overall, 655 AIDS cases were reported in Maryland during 1990. But Dr. Audrey Rogers, chief epidemiologist for the state AIDS Administration, said the final figure probably will match orexceed last year's total of 761 when doctors finish reporting.Women accounted for 19 percent of the 1990 cases. Since th government began keeping AIDS records in 1981, 459 women have been diagnosed with acquired immune deficiency syndrome in Maryland.
NEWS
By Bill Ingram | September 12, 1994
IN EARLY June, Associated Press reporter Ron Word chronicled the tragedy of Tashia Shipley, who had just died at 11 of AIDS, eight years after Florida authorities were first told that her mother's boyfriends were molesting her.In 1989, at age 6, the Jackson ville, Fla. girl was diagnosed with herpes and gonorrhea and Florida's health department finally concluded she was a victim of sexual abuse.Later, she was found to have syphilis.She was never tested for HIV, the virus that causes AIDS; the girl developed AIDS in 1992, the same year she was placed in the foster care of Carl and Arlene Shipley.
NEWS
By Deborah Toich and Deborah Toich,Staff writer | January 30, 1991
MacArthur Middle School students recently could be heard filling thehallways with the positive rap message, "Up with hope, down with dope, and protect yourself against AIDS."The message was an outgrowth of the Baltimore Care Connection's Jan. 25 production of "A Time for Life, We're Protecting Ourselves Against AIDS."This original musical dance-rap production, written by Morgan State University graduate Bryant B. Bolling, was developed primarily foraudiences of preteens and teen-agers, but is also appropriate for older audiences.
NEWS
By H. B. Johnson Jr | October 18, 1994
YOU HAVE worked with Janice for several years. She sits facing you, her desk flush with yours. Not only have your years together been mutually rewarding professionally, but also out of this good working relationship has grown a friendship.That is why you are somewhat concerned over a change in her appearance. Recently, Janice's skin seems dark and dry, her face is getting thin, and she appears to be taking a lot of pills. Your inquiries about her health have been met by silence, a blank far off stare, and ultimately a not so convincing, "Nothing.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1995
Although the number of new AIDS cases in the United States dipped last year, the epidemic has shown no signs of abating in Baltimore and Maryland.With 2,951 people diagnosed in the state last fiscal year, Maryland had the fourth-highest rate of new cases in the nation, trailing New York, Florida and New Jersey, according to figures released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Two years ago, the state ranked eighth.In the fiscal year that ended June 30, about 59 new cases were diagnosed for every 100,000 people living in the state, compared with 45 per 100,000 a year earlier.
NEWS
By JOHN A. MORRIS and JOHN A. MORRIS,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1995
An aide to former Anne Arundel County Executive Robert R. Neall will receive a lucrative pension when she retires despite an opinion from Maryland Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr., a county spokeswoman said Friday.Mr. Curran released a legal opinion Thursday suggesting county officials incorrectly credited Louise Hayman, who was Mr. Neall's press secretary, with four years she had worked for former Gov. William Donald Schaefer.State Del. John R. Leopold, who requested Mr. Curran's opinion in July, called it a "public rebuke" of county officials, particularly County Attorney Phillip F. Scheibe.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | October 23, 1994
A recent spurt in reporting has pushed the cumulative total of AIDS cases diagnosed in Maryland past the 10,000 mark.The total leaped by more than 1,100 cases -- a 13 percent increase -- between July 1 and Sept. 30, according to figures released by the state this month.The new data show that 10,140 cases of AIDS -- up from 8,976 in June -- have been diagnosed in Maryland since the start of the epidemic in 1981. Of those 10,140 people, 5,637 have died.The recent three-month increase in reported cases -- about equal to the number of new cases for all of 1990 -- stemmed mainly from a backlog that had gone unrecorded by the Baltimore City Health Department in early 1994, said state health officials.
NEWS
By H. B. Johnson Jr | October 18, 1994
YOU HAVE worked with Janice for several years. She sits facing you, her desk flush with yours. Not only have your years together been mutually rewarding professionally, but also out of this good working relationship has grown a friendship.That is why you are somewhat concerned over a change in her appearance. Recently, Janice's skin seems dark and dry, her face is getting thin, and she appears to be taking a lot of pills. Your inquiries about her health have been met by silence, a blank far off stare, and ultimately a not so convincing, "Nothing.
NEWS
By Bill Ingram | September 12, 1994
IN EARLY June, Associated Press reporter Ron Word chronicled the tragedy of Tashia Shipley, who had just died at 11 of AIDS, eight years after Florida authorities were first told that her mother's boyfriends were molesting her.In 1989, at age 6, the Jackson ville, Fla. girl was diagnosed with herpes and gonorrhea and Florida's health department finally concluded she was a victim of sexual abuse.Later, she was found to have syphilis.She was never tested for HIV, the virus that causes AIDS; the girl developed AIDS in 1992, the same year she was placed in the foster care of Carl and Arlene Shipley.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing Writer/United Feature Syndicate | February 9, 1993
Did you know that you can actually train yourself to run faster as you approach the finish line?Your muscles have a natural buffering system than can help to neutralize the lactic acid as it accumulates, preventing the pain and the need to slow down. You can enhance this buffering capacity by intensely training once a week.Once a week, competitive runners train to improve their ability to sprint at the end of a race by running as fast and hard as they can for 30 seconds, followed by a 30-second recovery period.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer The New York Times contributed to this story | July 28, 1992
Hoping to unravel a mystery that baffled scientists at a world AIDS conference last week, federal health officials plan to ask the nation's doctors to report any cases of patients who have acquired immune deficiency syndrome but lack the virus usually linked to the disease.Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of AIDS research for the National Institutes of Health, said yesterday that the federal Centers for Disease Control and the NIH would put out the call in an attempt to learn whether the phenomenon was widespread and if a new virus was at work.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing Writer/United Feature Syndicate | February 9, 1993
Did you know that you can actually train yourself to run faster as you approach the finish line?Your muscles have a natural buffering system than can help to neutralize the lactic acid as it accumulates, preventing the pain and the need to slow down. You can enhance this buffering capacity by intensely training once a week.Once a week, competitive runners train to improve their ability to sprint at the end of a race by running as fast and hard as they can for 30 seconds, followed by a 30-second recovery period.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer The New York Times contributed to this story | July 28, 1992
Hoping to unravel a mystery that baffled scientists at a world AIDS conference last week, federal health officials plan to ask the nation's doctors to report any cases of patients who have acquired immune deficiency syndrome but lack the virus usually linked to the disease.Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of AIDS research for the National Institutes of Health, said yesterday that the federal Centers for Disease Control and the NIH would put out the call in an attempt to learn whether the phenomenon was widespread and if a new virus was at work.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff writer | April 1, 1992
From 1981 until last August, the Carroll County Health Department recorded 24 cases of AIDS, with half of those people now deceased.In the past seven months since Linda Stromberg, a registered nurse, became the county's AIDS caseworker, that list has grown by at least six more countians."
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