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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | October 11, 2012
Four more Marylanders have developed fungal meningitis after receiving a steriod injection for back pain as a national outbreak has grown to 170 victims in several states. In Maryland, 13 people have been diagnosed with the rare disease and 1,500 could have been exposed to it. One person in the state has died, but health officials have released no specifics about the case. The outbreak has been linked to the steroid methylprednisolone acetate that was produced and distributed by the New England Compounding Center in Framingham, Mass.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
State health officials confirmed Thursday this season's first flu case. An Eastern Shore adult was hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed influenza and later released, according to the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. The strain was A (H3), which was included in this year's flu vaccine, though officials did not say if the person was vaccinated. The first case last year was reported a week earlier, on Oct. 3. The flu season generally lasts until spring and most cases are not lab-confirmed or even reported because many people do not seek medical care.
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NEWS
November 28, 2012
My wife grew up in a large Catholic family in Locust Point, and she and her siblings attended Our Lady of Good Counsel School. They have wonderful stories of friends, relatives, co-workers and neighborhood characters, second and third generation descendants of immigrants from Germany, Poland and Ireland, who are the embodiment of American working class families who sacrificed so much to give their children a better life. In this close community, the stories about John Merzbacher and the atrocities he committed on innocent children began surfacing early on ("Calls for reform in cases of abuse," Nov. 27)
NEWS
By Justin George and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Andy Joyce drove his tow truck just after midnight to a West Baltimore service call, where he met a mother and small child waiting with their disabled vehicle. It was Nov. 1, 2010, and the 23-year-old had only worked a few weeks for Gordon Kelly's Quick Response towing company. It was the end of his shift. The mother and child got a ride from someone as Joyce lowered his truck's bed to tow the Dodge Durango near Mosher Street and Druid Hill Avenue. About two hours later, a passerby noticed the truck's door open, engine running, and Joyce slumped inside.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2012
When Timothy Scott Sherman shot and killed his mother and adoptive father while they slept, the case disturbed the normally quiet life in the small Harford County hamlet of Hickory. A quarter-century later, another family murder has rocked the county, in neighboring Bel Air. In that case, Robert C. Richardson III has confessed to killing his father, according to authorities. The state's attorney for Harford County, Joseph I. Cassilly, a gruff no-nonsense lawman, prosecuted the 1987 Sherman case in the beginning of his career and now takes the lead on the Richardson case, which has once again cast a pall over his community.
NEWS
July 2, 2010
I keep reading that one detective of the 50 who handle reports of rape is responsible for one-fifth of the reports labeled "unfounded." I'd like to know how he comes to be involved in so many cases, and just how many cases he handled. Less than 200 reports spread over a 50-man unit would be four cases per detective. We're told this one detective labeled 14 cases "unfounded." How many cases did he work? Is more than one detective involved in each report? Is a small set of detectives responsible for all rape reports?
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
Nearly a year after Maryland's highest court tossed out most of a $1.65 billion jury verdict against ExxonMobil Corp. in connection with a 2006 underground gasoline leak in northern Baltimore County, 43 families have settled their cases rather than return for new trials. Theodore M. Flerlage Jr., a lawyer for the plaintiffs, said Monday that two groups that had been scheduled for trial this past Monday and next Monday have settled their cases. They're the latest of four groups that have settled this month, leaving about 50 cases to be resolved.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2013
A Marylander has died of rabies for the first time since 1976, state health officials said Tuesday. It is not yet known how the person contracted the virus, which is found in animals across the state. Officials are exploring how and where the person was exposed to the virus and assessing the risk of rabies exposure to those who had direct contact with the individual. That risk is thought to be minor, as rabies is usually passed through a bite from an infected animal. Health officials are not releasing any further details on the individual, citing privacy reasons.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2011
GMAC Mortgage said Tuesday it is dropping about 250 Maryland foreclosure cases that were apparently "robo-signed," giving homeowners a second chance to save their properties — and raising the possibility that other lenders might follow suit. The company said it is asking Maryland courts to dismiss cases in which it submitted "potentially defective" affidavits, documents signed by an employee who didn't confirm the information's accuracy and that were improperly notarized. The practice, dubbed robo-signing, appears to have been widespread among large mortgage servicers.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
The Maryland Tax Court has frequently failed to rule on residential property assessment cases as promptly as the law requires, according to a state audit made public Thursday. The court, which hears appeals in cases involving state and local taxes, must hear and decide residential property assessment cases within 90 days. But 41 percent of the cases heard between July 2010 and mid-February took longer - as much as a year past the 90-day point, the Office of Legislative Audits said.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
As his second trial for the murder of 16-year-old Phylicia Barnes approaches, Michael Maurice Johnson took the witness stand Tuesday and testified that his former attorney told him he had to talk to police — bad advice his new lawyers say helped get him convicted. "He didn't give me an option," said Johnson, 30, his voice scratchy over the courtroom speakers. A Baltimore jury found Johnson guilty of second degree murder last year, but the verdict was overturned after a judge ruled that prosecutors withheld information about a key witness in the case.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
Officials at two Washington, D.C.-area hospitals said Friday they had isolated patients over fears of Ebola after the nation's first case of the deadly virus was confirmed in Dallas this week. But officials at one of the hospitals, Shady Grove Adventist Hospital in Rockville, determined late Friday that their patient had malaria, not Ebola, hospital officials said in a statement late Friday. Howard University Hospital quarantined a patient who had recently traveled to Nigeria out of "an abundance of caution," officials said.
NEWS
October 2, 2014
"This is not West Africa," Texas health commissioner Dr. David Lakey said Wednesday at a news conference designed to dispel Texans' (and Americans') fear of an Ebola outbreak after a man there was diagnosed with the disease. "This is a very sophisticated city, a very sophisticated hospital. " The subtext: All those gruesome photos you're seeing of people dying in the streets in West Africa — that's something that happens over there, to other people, not here, not to us. But what the events of the last few days have shown is that it's exactly that kind of hubris that puts us most at risk, and that for all the sophistication of the U.S. health system, it only takes a simple lapse to create the conditions for a broader outbreak.
NEWS
September 30, 2014
Can anybody explain why Johns Hopkins is liable for any of the reprehensible actions of Dr. Nikita Levy ( "Attorney says Hopkins was informed of improper exams before investigation," Sept. 26)? Why is Johns Hopkins Medicine agreeing to pay anything to the victims of Dr. Levy's serious transgressions? Was Johns Hopkins in any way responsible for the harm that was caused to Dr. Levy's victims? In all of the reporting on this case I have never heard one thing that would indicate Dr. Levy's actions were allowed or caused or in any way made possible by Johns Hopkins.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 27, 2014
Even as we continued to dissect the National Football League's mishandling of the Ray Rice case and millionaires associated with the matter apologized (again) for being obtuse to domestic violence, the conversation seemed to turn toward a silver lining. To wit: Maybe good will come of this ugliness. The NFL's inadequate reaction to Rice's assault unleashed strong public backlash, heightened awareness of the everyday reality of intimate-partner abuse and forced the league and the Baltimore Ravens to make big-time amends, including a six-figure donation to the House of Ruth Maryland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
An extra spark in the playing at the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's first program of the 2014-2015 subscription series a week ago made me think this would turn out to be an exceptional season. Something about the second program this weekend made me even more convinced. I know you are tired of hearing me say this, but I just want to make sure it's sinking in - the BSO is operating at a technical peak these days and demonstrating a tighter rapport than ever with music director Marin Alsop.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2011
Baltimore homicide detectives have made an arrest in one of the open murder cases cited in an internal Police Department memo that accused prosecutors of holding up cases. The killing had been among five cases that the acting commander of the city homicide unit cited in a memo to top commanders in which he said prosecutors were "stalling and hindering" detectives' ability to close cases. He concluded that the strategies of police and prosecutors were "not marrying up cohesively," The Baltimore Sun reported Wednesday.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
As an unusual strain of virus continues its march across the country — showing up most recently in Pennsylvania and Virginia — health officials in Maryland are warning doctors to be on the lookout and advising parents to prepare. Enterovirus is common, with millions in the United States sickened every year, most with mild cases. But the relatively rare strain called EV-D68 can cause severe respiratory illness in children with asthma or other health conditions, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
Police are investigating an alleged "bias incident" in Baltimore County on Thursday afternoon in which a driver allegedly shot a BB or airsoft gun in the direction of three pedestrians as he yelled "Jews, Jews, Jews" at them. The three males told police they were in the 6800 block of Old Pimlico Road about 5:30 p.m., near the intersection with Green Summit Road when the driver approached them, rolled down his window, held a weapon outside and yelled the taunt, police said. He then fired the weapon, which "appeared to be some type of BB or air gun," in their direction, police said.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Maryland health officials confirmed Wednesday the first case of enterovirus D68, a somewhat rare type of respiratory infection that has been sweeping the country and largely sickening children with asthma and underlying health conditions. Doctors in Maryland had expected cases, though most were expected to be minor, or the equivalent of a cold that would not require medical attention. Serious cases can cause breathing problems for children. The state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said the specimen was collected from a hospitalized child and sent to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for testing.
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