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By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2002
Annapolis Police Chief Joseph S. Johnson, who joined the department 11 years ago, calls it "absolutely unprecedented." Officer Hal Dalton, a 25-year veteran, can't remember the last time it happened. The small Annapolis Police Department, which employs no homicide detectives and just eight criminal investigators, has its hands full this month with two open homicide cases and two unsolved attempted murders. In addition to the high-profile fatal carjacking in the historic district Sept.
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NEWS
By Tamieka Briscoe, Capital News Service | February 27, 2014
Judge Robert C. Wilcox of Davidsonville retired in 2010, but after two months vacationing in Florida, he traded back the beach for the bench. "I love the law, and I like what I do," said Wilcox, 70, a retired judge of the Maryland District Court in Annapolis, where he continues to try cases two days a week. "When you do what you like, it's not work. " Wilcox belongs to a group the Maryland court system refers to as retired/recalled judges. Recalled judges work part time, not to exceed 82 days per year.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 5, 1994
WASHINGTON -- A panel of federal judges is proposing new limits on access to federal courts for Social Security beneficiaries, victims of job discrimination and consumers as part of a long-range plan to cope with huge increases in the caseload.The panel of nine judges, who have a combined total of more than 160 years on the bench, was created in 1990 by the Judicial Conference of the United States, the policy-making arm of the federal judiciary.If recent trends continue, the judges said, the federal courts will be inundated with civil and criminal cases.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2012
Jim Nicholas lay in a hospital bed recovering after a heart procedure when his attorney called with life-changing news: The Social Security Administration would pay him more than $206,000 in disability benefits, bringing an end to his nine-year court battle. Ever since he began suffering from heart failure, Nicholas and his wife, Yvonne, had been trying to prove he was sick enough to get benefits from the agency, which not only administers Social Security but provides support for those too disabled to work.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1998
The Howard County District Court is one step closer to getting a fifth judge to deal with a burgeoning caseload.Yesterday, a 13-member judicial nominating committee submitted the names of four candidates to the governor: Pamila Junette Brown, counsel to the state Department of General Services since 1990; Cornielia Bright Gordon, a state administrative law judge; Constantine James Sfekas, a lawyer in Ellicott City; and Michael A. Weal, an assistant state's...
NEWS
By Mark Binker and Mark Binker,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | November 2, 1997
GREENBELT -- By the time a clerk rolls an overflowing two-tiered document cart into the courtroom, a dozen lawyers and about 50 clients are milling about - an hour and a half before visiting Judge L. Edward Friend will start hearing cases.Clients, mostly in T-shirts and jeans, sit like quiet parishioners in the court's two rows of four wooden pews while lawyers jostle about the attorneys' tables trying to settle some of the 100-plus bankruptcy cases that Friend will process before lunchtime.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2001
Baltimore and Washington lag behind the suburbs in their efforts to reduce the number of families receiving cash welfare payments, according to a new Brookings Institution study of the effects of five years of welfare reform. Baltimore's caseload declined 50 percent from January 1996 to January 2001, compared with a combined 68 percent for its three largest suburbs. The District of Columbia's caseload dropped 37 percent, compared with a drop of 72 percent in five suburban jurisdictions, the study said.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1995
John E. Kelly, a Fallston lawyer with 24 years' experience as a prosecutor, government attorney and civil litigator, has been named the fifth Circuit judge for Harford County.Mr. Kelly, 50, "was clearly the universal choice of all the various legal constituencies we spoke with in Harford County," Gov. Parris N. Glendening said in announcing the appointment Friday. He was chosen from 23 applicants."I believe a judge should treat everyone with respect," Mr. Kelly said. "I have the right temperament to be a judge.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 23, 1996
WASHINGTON -- State officials are discovering that the work requirements of the new welfare law are much less onerous than they first believed.The work requirements will be substantially reduced for any state that reduces the number of families receiving welfare, compared with the total in the 1995 fiscal year, and that number is already way down in most states. Thus a state can comply with the law by putting some people to work and by simply removing others from the rolls, regardless of whether they find jobs.
NEWS
March 12, 2006
An editorial Friday should have stated that Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy is committed to a caseload study of her office, but will not submit to a management audit.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2012
State health officials are seeking the public's advice on how to deal with new federal guidelines expanding the number of young children deemed at risk of harm from low-level lead exposure. The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene is considering whether to have local health departments follow all young children testing positive for low levels of toxic lead in their bloodstream, or to leave the least exposed youngsters to doctors and other health care providers to track. Earlier this year, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention effectively halved its long-standing threshold for acting on low-level lead exposure in young children.
NEWS
October 27, 2011
If you believe your house is haunted, or want to try some investigating yourself, the online directory paranormalsocieties.com lists some 30 groups in Maryland that offer their services, usually free of charge. Here are a few operating out of the Baltimore area. Group: Greater Maryland Paranormal Society Founded: 2006 Investigators: 13 Location: Curtis Bay Website: greater-maryland-paranormal-society.com Caseload: 16-25 investigations a year "I grew up in a house in Brooklyn that had paranormal activity," says founder and lead investigator Bill Hartley.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun reporter | February 28, 2008
A typical day at Dr. Daniel Levy's pediatrics practice in Owings Mills provides a snapshot of the current flu epidemic, as five to 10 youngsters show up with the telltale fever, aches, cough and other miseries that mark the seasonal disease. "This year has been a bear," said Levy, who might see almost as many flu patients in a single day now as he saw during the entire 2006-2007 season. Across the country, doctors are reporting far heavier flu caseloads than they did in the previous two years, which saw a decline in the cyclical illness.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,[sun reporter] | March 4, 2007
After jurors filed into a room behind the third-floor courtroom Thursday to begin deliberations in an assault case, Judge William C. Mulford II took his books and headed down a back staircase to his chambers one flight down. As the 11th judge in a 10-courtroom courthouse, he is a nomad of sorts, navigating the rabbit warren of hidden corridors and stairwells in the Anne Arundel County Courthouse, hearing cases wherever a courtroom is available. Since his job was created 14 months ago, Mulford has joined the other sitting judges and a parade of retired judges in a game of musical courtrooms that has sometimes forced hearings to be delayed for lack of a place to hold them.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | November 22, 2006
NAIROBI, Kenya -- The number of people across the globe living with HIV infections has increased over the past two years, but the African countries hit hardest by AIDS are making progress in fighting the disease, United Nations experts said yesterday. The worldwide increase in HIV cases - to 39.5 million this year from 36.9 million two years ago - is due partly to people living longer thanks to greater access to life-saving anti-retroviral drugs, the U.N. AIDS agency and the World Health Organization said in their annual report on the epidemic.
NEWS
March 12, 2006
An editorial Friday should have stated that Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy is committed to a caseload study of her office, but will not submit to a management audit.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Evening Sun Staff | February 14, 1991
After a year and the use of University of Baltimore's expertise, the Department of Human Resources has identified the reason welfare cases began increasing while the Maryland economy still was healthy.A thick report of research and graphs released today basically reaches one simple conclusion: The Maryland economy wasn't as healthy as statistics suggested it was.The increase in the welfare caseload, once thought to be a final indicator of hard times, proved to be the first symptom of the state's economic downturn, the report says.
NEWS
October 27, 2011
If you believe your house is haunted, or want to try some investigating yourself, the online directory paranormalsocieties.com lists some 30 groups in Maryland that offer their services, usually free of charge. Here are a few operating out of the Baltimore area. Group: Greater Maryland Paranormal Society Founded: 2006 Investigators: 13 Location: Curtis Bay Website: greater-maryland-paranormal-society.com Caseload: 16-25 investigations a year "I grew up in a house in Brooklyn that had paranormal activity," says founder and lead investigator Bill Hartley.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2005
Tucked away in a corner of the Social Security Administration's sprawling Woodlawn campus is a building employees have long called "The Plantation," a nickname reflecting decades of real and perceived discrimination. Workers in the Security West building process paperwork for millions of retired and disabled Americans. The pay is low, the job is monotonous, and the work is performed mostly by women and minorities. Some agency employees - particularly blacks - see Security West and its nickname as indicative of discrimination against support staff members throughout the Woodlawn complex passed over for promotions despite years of experience.
NEWS
April 11, 2005
MARYLANDERS didn't need a whistleblower to point out critical fissures in the state's child welfare system. For the Ehrlich administration to spend all its energy protesting the actions of an erstwhile ally, whose recently released e-mail exchanges with top department staff point out glaring safety issues in Baltimore and elsewhere, while not denying the substance of her messages, misses the point. Better to spend the time attacking the problem - that way, things might improve. For example, the city's Department of Social Services and the plaintiffs in a consent decree have disagreed for more than 16 years on the actual number of caseworkers serving the city's 7,000 children in foster care each year.
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