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NEWS
October 4, 2002
Gertrude Murphy, a schoolteacher who became the last resident in the town of Lester, near Stampede Pass in Washington's Cascade Range, died of cancer Sunday. She was 99.
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SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley , jamison.hensley@baltsun.com | December 9, 2009
Even after their unsightly 27-14 loss to the Green Bay Packers on Monday night, the Ravens still have a shot at the playoffs because they don't face a team with a winning record the rest of the way. The Ravens' biggest opponent over the final four weeks of the regular season might be themselves - or the officials, depending on your perspective. Penalties have dogged the Ravens throughout the season and have cost them a chance to keep pace in the AFC wild-card race. The Ravens' 12 penalties at Lambeau Field were the most in the 31-game John Harbaugh era. Their five pass-interference penalties (four of which were on the defense)
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BUSINESS
By David Altaner and David Altaner,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel The New York Time News Service contributed to this report | November 21, 1991
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- The multimillionaire chairman of a publicly traded Florida company has disappeared, and it appears he may have left investors holding the bag.Cascade International Inc., a retail and perfume company, announced yesterday that for the last two days it has been unable to locate Victor G. Incendy, who is chairman, chief executive officer, principal shareholder and company founder.In an emergency board meeting, the Boca Raton-based company named attorney Aaron Karp temporary chairman and fired Mr. Incendy.
NEWS
By Tim Wheeler and Tim Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | October 13, 2009
Some of us have a hard time looking beyond today. But when it comes to thinking about growth and development - perennial hot topics virtually everywhere - what if we took a longer view? What do we want our communities to look like? Not next year, or 10 or even 20 years from now. A century from now. That's what nearly 100 businesses, civic and environmental groups, government agencies and hundreds of citizens have done in the region bordering Washington's Puget Sound. Starting four years ago, the participants hammered out the "Cascade Agenda," a call to conserve working forests, farmlands, shorelines, parks and natural areas while also making cities and towns attractive places to live, work and raise families.
NEWS
July 31, 2006
Emory P. Stancliff, a retired Army sergeant who served in the Korean and Vietnam wars, died of pneumonia Tuesday at Waynesboro Hospital in Pennsylvania. He was 74 and had lived in Cascade. He grew up in Essex and graduated from Kenwood High School in 1949. Upon graduation he joined the Army, where he became a master sergeant and served until 1978. Family members say he was stationed all over the world, including Korea, Vietnam and Alaska. After retiring from the Army he worked as a correctional officer at the Maryland Correctional Institution in Hagerstown and for Valley Mall Security.
NEWS
By Diane Mullaly from the files of the Howard County Historical Society's library | January 19, 1997
25 years ago (week of Jan. 16-22, 1972):Padraic Kennedy was named as the first full-time president of the Columbia Association. He left a position at Boise Cascade Urban Development Corporation to accept the CA post. Prior to that, Mr. Kennedy had served as the director of Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA).50 years ago (week of Jan. 12-18, 1947):The Howard County Commissioners appointed Charles Linthicum as night policeman for Ellicott City. Mr. Linthicum's prior experience included Military Police duty in the Maryland State Guard, as well as security work at the Doughnut Corp.
NEWS
By Tim Wheeler and Tim Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | October 13, 2009
Some of us have a hard time looking beyond today. But when it comes to thinking about growth and development - perennial hot topics virtually everywhere - what if we took a longer view? What do we want our communities to look like? Not next year, or 10 or even 20 years from now. A century from now. That's what nearly 100 businesses, civic and environmental groups, government agencies and hundreds of citizens have done in the region bordering Washington's Puget Sound. Starting four years ago, the participants hammered out the "Cascade Agenda," a call to conserve working forests, farmlands, shorelines, parks and natural areas while also making cities and towns attractive places to live, work and raise families.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | June 25, 1995
It took only three minutes and 45 seconds for the Base Closure and Realignment Commission to change the rest of Ginger Baylor's life."No one knows what to do. There's no future here," said Mrs. Baylor, 26, sipping a beer at the American Legion Hall in the town of Cascade, in the shadow of one of the Army bases selected for closing by the commission Friday."
BUSINESS
By Opinions on stocks offered by investment experts. Compiled by Steve Halpen for Knight Ridder | April 24, 1991
Pepsico"PepsiCo (PEP, NYSE, around $32) was one of the best growth stocks of the 1980s, and its outstanding profit prospects suggest the 1990s will be a repeat performance," says Dow Theory Forecasts of Hammond, Ind."PepsiCo's top-notch marketing skills have parlayed powerful brand names into steady earnings growth."Steady growth of the U.S. soft drink market and foreign expansion opportunities point to sustained double-digit gains for the soft drink sector. The stock offers superior capital-gains potential.
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,Sun Staff | February 22, 2004
We cannot tell a lie. It's George Washington's birthday today. In honor of the father of our country and his prized Mount Vernon, Va., estate, York Wallcoverings has created a home collection of wallpapers and borders and an art accent mural window. The designs are based on original historic documents from the Mount Vernon archives, including Washington's journals and books. Designs include Chairs With Writing (pictured above), featuring neoclassical chairs against a background of Washington's handwriting; Mount Vernon Scenic Toile (right)
NEWS
September 18, 2008
The Federal Reserve's last-minute rescue of insurance giant American International Group has put taxpayers on the hook for big bucks again, but not intervening would have posed even greater financial risks here and abroad. The U.S. economy would have taken a terribly costly hit if AIG slid into bankruptcy, and the pain would have radiated through all sectors. Instead, the Fed agreed to loan AIG $85 billion to meet its obligations in a decision that two days ago seemed unthinkable for Fed Chairman Ben S. Bernanke and U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry M. Paulson Jr. They had said as much.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | December 13, 2006
Ralph Hill, a regular customer at Sweet Cascades in historic Ellicott City, likes to buy ice cream, chocolate-covered pretzels and other treats at the little chocolate shop. But on a particularly cold day last week, he just wanted a cup of coffee. No such luck. Sweet Cascades doesn't sell anything as mundane as coffee, so owner Sue Whary talked him into a cup of decadent sipping chocolate instead. It's made with chocolate, heavy cream and whole milk, she said. Hill asked if it could be made with skim milk.
NEWS
July 31, 2006
Emory P. Stancliff, a retired Army sergeant who served in the Korean and Vietnam wars, died of pneumonia Tuesday at Waynesboro Hospital in Pennsylvania. He was 74 and had lived in Cascade. He grew up in Essex and graduated from Kenwood High School in 1949. Upon graduation he joined the Army, where he became a master sergeant and served until 1978. Family members say he was stationed all over the world, including Korea, Vietnam and Alaska. After retiring from the Army he worked as a correctional officer at the Maryland Correctional Institution in Hagerstown and for Valley Mall Security.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2004
CASCADE - The former Fort Ritchie Army post in Washington County will be retooled into something new - what, though, isn't clear - by a Columbia developer of suburban offices filled with federal government agencies and their contractors. PenMar Development Corp., the redevelopment authority for the post, signed a sales agreement with Corporate Office Properties Trust yesterday, though both sides have 90 days to reconsider. Corporate Office Properties would not publicly reveal its plans for the site, about 600 acres in the Western Maryland mountaintop community of Cascade.
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,Sun Staff | February 22, 2004
We cannot tell a lie. It's George Washington's birthday today. In honor of the father of our country and his prized Mount Vernon, Va., estate, York Wallcoverings has created a home collection of wallpapers and borders and an art accent mural window. The designs are based on original historic documents from the Mount Vernon archives, including Washington's journals and books. Designs include Chairs With Writing (pictured above), featuring neoclassical chairs against a background of Washington's handwriting; Mount Vernon Scenic Toile (right)
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2004
CASCADE - When the Army cleared out of Fort Ritchie in 1998, local officials envisioned a high-tech business park springing up in its place and restoring hundreds of well-paying jobs to these remote mountains in Western Maryland. But six years later, the former base looks much as it did when the soldiers left: a ghost town of darkened buildings, rutted roads and drooping weeds. To be sure, base closures are never tidy. Environmental ills, complex regulations and quarrels among developers, local officials and the military often combine to stall their rebirth.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2004
CASCADE - The former Fort Ritchie Army post in Washington County will be retooled into something new - what, though, isn't clear - by a Columbia developer of suburban offices filled with federal government agencies and their contractors. PenMar Development Corp., the redevelopment authority for the post, signed a sales agreement with Corporate Office Properties Trust yesterday, though both sides have 90 days to reconsider. Corporate Office Properties would not publicly reveal its plans for the site, about 600 acres in the Western Maryland mountaintop community of Cascade.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | July 18, 1998
CASCADE -- After more than 70 years as a military post, Fort Ritchie symbolically closed a chapter on Army life yesterday evening with a formal ceremony in which the U.S. Garrison flag was rolled up for the final time.Armed with deck chairs and blankets, cameras and coolers, thousands of people staked out places on a field in a center of the fort to watch the 5 p.m. inactivation of the small, cozy military post in picturesque Cascade, which those who live in the area say has grown on them over the years.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2003
Sometime around 4 p.m. yesterday, a power disruption along the U.S.-Canadian border near Lake Erie cut electrical service across the region, blacking out cities spread as far as Canada, New Jersey, Vermont, Ohio and Michigan. That startlingly rapid chain reaction was caused by interconnections along the same electric grid that usually keeps power flowing smoothly from the Eastern Seaboard to the Great Plains. The grid - a complex web of interconnected high-voltage lines and power plants - moves electricity from region to region, wherever demand arises.
NEWS
By Geoff Boucher and Geoff Boucher,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 11, 2003
LOS ANGELES - Candid friends of Phil Spector admit that the bodyguards who prowled the night with the famed record producer were really in the business of protecting him from one dangerous person - himself. So it's telling that, five months ago, Spector apparently decided that the wild life was so far behind him that he didn't need a shadow. He came to that decision at a shining, hopeful moment in his life. His friends say he had been sober for three years and far removed from the old days when he was notorious as a raging, erratic genius with a penchant for guns.
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