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Cary Grant

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By Paul Moore and Paul Moore,SUN STAFF | February 23, 1997
"Cary Grant: A Class Apart," by Graham McCann. Columbia University Press. 352 pages. $24.95.The most familiar screen image of Cary Grant is masculine glamor and sophistication, formed by characters in "The Philadelphia Story," "To Catch a Thief" and "North by Northwest." A less familiar image came from "None But the Lonely Heart," in which Grant played a restless Cockney drifter living in London's East End.But as Graham McCann's engrossing and serious biography proves, the second image is essential to understanding how the movie star Cary Grant emerged from Archie Leach, the product of an English working-class environment.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow , michael.sragow@baltsun.com | December 4, 2009
During one of the satirical cocktail conversations in Alfred Hitchcock's "Rope" (1948), two women debate the virtues of James Mason ("so attractively sinister!") and Cary Grant. So it was perhaps a fulfillment of a directorial dream when, 50 years ago, Hitchcock pitted these two stars against each other in his most glorious adventure fantasy, "North by Northwest." "North by Northwest" reminds you of how magical and emotionally satisfying movie escapism can be, especially in the current era of "Transformers."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | January 18, 2004
Cary Grant was born 100 years ago today in Bristol, England. The fantasy life of England, America, and all of planet Earth would never be the same. In his 34-year big-screen career, he epitomized -- and for many, defined -- the man of the world. When Frank Sinatra presented an honorary Oscar in 1970 to Grant "for his unique mastery of the art of screen acting," Sinatra said, with legend-to-legend sympathy, that he earned it "for being Cary Grant." Actually, he earned it for acting Cary Grant: the urban cavalier with a quick tongue and cunning moves.
FEATURES
By JOHN ANDERSON and JOHN ANDERSON,NEWSDAY | February 10, 2006
Los Angeles-- --Everyone wants to be Cary Grant," an actor named Cary Grant once said. "Even I want to be Cary Grant." Does anyone want to be Harrison Ford? You'd think. The 36 movies he's made since 1967 have grossed more than $3 billion. He's starred in some of the most popular films of all time (Star Wars, Raiders of the Lost Ark), received an Academy Award nomination (Witness) and several for Golden Globes (Sabrina, The Fugitive, The Mosquito Coast). He was named Box Office Star of the Century by America movie theater owners at the 1994 Sho-West convention.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | December 6, 1991
When the Towson Commons opens in the spring, it will include an eight-screen cinema complex, thanks to General Cinema, the corporation that owns the Perring Plaza Cinemas and the York Road Cinemas.When the Commons cineplex opens, however, the Perring Plazas will disappear. They will be replaced by an economy food mart.The General Cinema Corp. is apparently not planning to shut down the York Road Cinemas, at present.*''Race the Wind,'' a 39-minute film on the history of sailing, will replace The Rolling Stones movie at the Imax Theater at the Maryland Science Center on Dec. 13. ''Race the Wind'' will continue there through May 8. The film includes sail footage from 1929 to the present.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | August 5, 1997
Getting the girl. Getting the laugh. Getting the upper hand. Regardless of what he was after, Cary Grant always made getting it look so easy.TCM kicks off a 22-film Cary Grant retrospective tonight with two films he made with the master, Alfred Hitchcock: "North By Northwest" (8 p.m.), in which he gets famously strafed by an airplane, and "To Catch a Thief" (10: 30 p.m.), in which he gets Grace Kelly (lucky guy).Hitchcock no doubt took pleasure in taking a popular favorite like Grant and putting him in peril or making him a little unsavory.
NEWS
July 1, 2003
A WONDERFUL ASPECT of modern life is that a group of people sitting around, say, a lunchroom table yesterday could energetically and argumentatively hash over the films of Katharine Hepburn. It doesn't matter that The African Queen was made 52 years ago, or The Philadelphia Story 11 years before that. Thanks to cable TV and the VCR, she was as much a part of our world as she was that of our parents or grandparents - perhaps even more so. When the news came Sunday that Miss Hepburn had died, at the age of 96, it summoned up a montage of movie images that have worked their way into national memory.
NEWS
June 1, 2002
COULD REALITY TV get any more absurd than the menu already dished up by television executives: make-believe safaris, a search for the perfect wife, bedding down with a bunch of rats, the furry kind? The answer, sadly, is yes. Here's the latest prime-time chatter from Hollywood: The featured performers in the next wave of reality TV programming won't be wanna-bes like Survivor's Richard Hatch, Big Brother's Will Kirby or Temptation Island's Billy Cleary and Mandy Lauderdale, but real-life stars who wanna-have their own reality TV shows.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | October 4, 1997
Day 2 of AMC's fifth annual Film Preservation Festival devotes itself to the films of Alfred Hitchcock, so you know plenty of good stuff is in store.The day's highlight is the TV debut of the restored version of "Vertigo" (8 p.m.-10: 15 p.m.), with James Stewart as a police investigator obsessed with a woman he's been asked to investigate. Kim Novak plays the mysterious woman he loses and then finds? The film is a masterpiece, and the $1 million restoration was worth every penny, restoring both the film's vivid colors and its wide-screen glory.
FEATURES
By JOHN ANDERSON and JOHN ANDERSON,NEWSDAY | February 10, 2006
Los Angeles-- --Everyone wants to be Cary Grant," an actor named Cary Grant once said. "Even I want to be Cary Grant." Does anyone want to be Harrison Ford? You'd think. The 36 movies he's made since 1967 have grossed more than $3 billion. He's starred in some of the most popular films of all time (Star Wars, Raiders of the Lost Ark), received an Academy Award nomination (Witness) and several for Golden Globes (Sabrina, The Fugitive, The Mosquito Coast). He was named Box Office Star of the Century by America movie theater owners at the 1994 Sho-West convention.
NEWS
By STEPHEN KIEHL and STEPHEN KIEHL,SUN REPORTER | February 4, 2006
If this were a telegram, we'd say: TLGRM DED. But this is a newspaper, so we'll say this: Western Union sent its final telegram last week, bringing to a close 150 years of shooting messages around the world, of those square message cards, of messenger boys (and later girls) on bikes and in radio cars fanning out across the country to announce births, deaths and everything in between. Western Union was making little money sending telegrams - $500,000 in revenue last year on 20,000 telegrams delivered - and will focus on the more lucrative money transfer business, with revenue of $4 billion annually.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | January 18, 2004
Cary Grant was born 100 years ago today in Bristol, England. The fantasy life of England, America, and all of planet Earth would never be the same. In his 34-year big-screen career, he epitomized -- and for many, defined -- the man of the world. When Frank Sinatra presented an honorary Oscar in 1970 to Grant "for his unique mastery of the art of screen acting," Sinatra said, with legend-to-legend sympathy, that he earned it "for being Cary Grant." Actually, he earned it for acting Cary Grant: the urban cavalier with a quick tongue and cunning moves.
FEATURES
By Hal Boedeker and Hal Boedeker,ORLANDO SENTINEL | January 12, 2004
They never shared a marquee in life, but they're linked in death as coming attractions from Turner Classic Movies. Cary Grant, Charlie Chaplin and director Cecil B. DeMille will be profiled in major documentaries during the next six months. Charlie: The Life and Art of Charles Chaplin appears in March, along with 11 of the actor-director's films and 36 of his short films. Time critic Richard Schickel directed and wrote Charlie and conducted interviews with Woody Allen, Martin Scorsese, Johnny Depp, Marcel Marceau, Claire Bloom and Robert Downey Jr. Schickel also worked extensively with actress Geraldine Chaplin, his subject's daughter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 14, 2003
Americans and newspeople, and maybe most of all American newspeople, love marking "an end of an era" as much as they love declaring "the end of innocence." The deaths of some of the major movie figures who passed away this year did mark the ends of eras: Katharine Hepburn of the first wave of American sound-film stars, Gregory Peck of the second wave that came in during World War II. As a movie personality, Bob Hope crested in the 1940s on his own innovation of bringing rapid-fire radio-style patter into big-screen comedy in a style so breezy it seemed improvised.
NEWS
July 1, 2003
A WONDERFUL ASPECT of modern life is that a group of people sitting around, say, a lunchroom table yesterday could energetically and argumentatively hash over the films of Katharine Hepburn. It doesn't matter that The African Queen was made 52 years ago, or The Philadelphia Story 11 years before that. Thanks to cable TV and the VCR, she was as much a part of our world as she was that of our parents or grandparents - perhaps even more so. When the news came Sunday that Miss Hepburn had died, at the age of 96, it summoned up a montage of movie images that have worked their way into national memory.
NEWS
December 7, 2002
THE MODERN jet-powered passenger plane, a child of the 1950s, has made the ideal of speed on land or at sea largely beside the point. That's why American trains are slower than they were a generation ago, and why the record for a trans-Atlantic crossing by a passenger liner, once a highly contested distinction, has stood unchallenged now for 50 years. It was in 1952 - a golden half-century ago - that the SS United States pulled away from her pier on the west side of Manhattan, set her course at the Ambrose Lightship standing guard outside New York Harbor, and, three days, 10 hours and 40 minutes later, carried her 1,660 passengers past Bishop's Rock in the English Channel.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | February 11, 1991
Back in 1896, tinkering with his idea for making pictures tha moved, Thomas Alva Edison filmed a little scene in his New Jersey laboratories. Perhaps the first titled movie ever, "The Kiss" merely featured a mustachioed gent planting an elaborate kiss on his shy belle."
NEWS
By Maureen Conners | August 5, 2001
MY SOCKS are destined to chase away deer. I'm not talking about new socks or freshly laundered socks that went through the dryer with a fabric softener. No, these are socks that my mother might joke could walk away on their own. Old socks. Worn socks. Sweaty socks. Ones that used to be headed for the trash can. These are the socks that repel deer. As a resident of a Baltimore suburb - where deer are plentiful and a common traffic hazard - I understand that I am closer to nature. I grew up on a farm and was very aware of the destruction deer caused in our cornfield and vegetable garden.
NEWS
June 1, 2002
COULD REALITY TV get any more absurd than the menu already dished up by television executives: make-believe safaris, a search for the perfect wife, bedding down with a bunch of rats, the furry kind? The answer, sadly, is yes. Here's the latest prime-time chatter from Hollywood: The featured performers in the next wave of reality TV programming won't be wanna-bes like Survivor's Richard Hatch, Big Brother's Will Kirby or Temptation Island's Billy Cleary and Mandy Lauderdale, but real-life stars who wanna-have their own reality TV shows.
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