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NEWS
April 16, 2010
"Kirikou and the Sorceress" (1998) Michel Ocelot's splendid animated feature tells a sensual, guilt-free fairy tale — a West African fable about the power of original innocence. A tiny baby boy named Kirikou pushes himself out of his mother at birth and rarely stops moving until he defeats the sorceress Karaba, who has laid waste to his village. Most of Kirikou's powers are simple, not super: the bravery of someone who doesn't know his limits, the forceful logic of untainted intelligence, a knack for healing rather than for revenge.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2014
Lewis C. Strudwick, a former partner in the Baltimore law firm of Ober/Kaler who had a penchant for drawing whimsical cartoons and a taste for culinary oddities, died Jan. 22 of complications from Parkinson's disease at Heron Point retirement community in Chestertown. He was 82. "Lewis was the consummate transactional lawyer, with an innate business sense and attention to detail," said Alan J. Mogol, a principal with Ober/Kaler who co-chairs the firm's finance group. "He was a counselor and not just a draftsman, making his client aware of the issues and consequences so they could make an informed decision.
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FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 17, 2003
The promoters of the flip, zesty, 94-minute anthology known only as The Animation Show promise, in their ads, "additional films and surprises." That might be a sure-fire marketing tool in a town overflowing with cartoon geeks, but in most cities they'd be better off letting their sleekest, blackest cat out of the bag. Tim Burton's oft-celebrated, rarely seen 1982 short Vincent is this show's chief "surprise." Though it runs a mere six minutes, it's enough to restore faith in Burton's talents after his herky-jerky Planet of the Apes.
NEWS
August 5, 2013
It is outrageous and offensive for cartoonist Kevin Kallaugher to picture the terrorist group Hamas as the equivalent of Israeli settlers in a recent cartoon accompanying your editorial about the upcoming peace talks ("Israeli-Palestinian talks merit guarded pessimism," July 31). Hamas' declared goal is the complete destruction of the Jewish state of Israel, and the group has bombed Israeli civilian populations since Israel evacuated Gaza in 2005. The settlers have built their communities on disputed lands that were captured from Jordan after a defensive war in 1967.
NEWS
September 4, 1991
From: Roy ShattGlen BurnieI have been an avid fan of Rob Snyder's cartoons for some time now and would like to commend him on his outstanding work.Every Sunday morning, I flip to the center of the Anne Arundel County Sun first, to see who or what is the subject of his satire.His cartoons are not only humorous but insightful, giving a unique perspective to the current events of our county. They have lent themselves to discussions with our neighbors, family and friends on the current affairs ofAnne Arundel County, as almost never a Sunday goes by without someone saying, "Did you see Snyder's cartoon this morning?"
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | December 26, 1996
One of the best things about Cibo Matto's debut album, "Viva! La Woman," is the way it conjures a whole world of people and emotions through its inventive use of sound.Working with a small group of musicians and a whole lot of technology, the duo -- singer Miho Hatori and keyboardist Yuka Honda -- have created one of the coziest and most entertaining havens to be found on disc. From wispy puffs of synthesizer to clanking electronic percussion to whispered trumpet obbligati, the instruments combine in every way imaginable, turning the album into a sort of aural smorgasbord.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | October 29, 1990
LOS ANGELES -- Marvel Productions will produce cartoons for movie theaters that will be shown prior to Twentieth Century Fox releases, the two companies said.The studio said that the cartoons, to be called "Fox Toons," should be ready for Fox summer movies in 1991.The studio's deal with Marvel follows a similar effort by Walt Disney Co., which has packaged Roger Rabbit cartoons with "Honey, I Shrunk the Kids" and "Dick Tracy."The company did not say how many cartoons Marvel will produce. Terms of the deal were not disclosed, but Fox said that it will retain rights to the cartoons after Marvel delivers them.
NEWS
By MAYA M. BERRY | February 9, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Americans are thoroughly comfortable with what we know well, such as in thinking that the enlightened West basks in the doctrine of free speech while pious Muslims condemn hate-filled cartoons with violent demonstrations. In our post-9/11 world, all is well. But something is amiss. As a person of faith, I found the cartoons published by the Danish daily Jyllands-Posten to be racist, base and grossly offensive. I was again distressed by the level to which anti-Islamic dogma has grown, and kept asking myself the same questions: Why did this paper publish these vile cartoons, and why did some Muslims respond with disturbing violence?
NEWS
February 2, 2006
PARIS -- French and German newspapers republished caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad yesterday in what they called a defense of freedom of expression, sparking fresh anger among Muslims. The drawings have divided opinion within Europe and the Middle East since a Danish newspaper first printed them in September. Islamic tradition bars any depiction of the prophet to prevent idolatry. The cartoons include an image of Muhammad wearing a turban shaped as a bomb and another portraying him holding a sword.
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | February 7, 2006
PHILADELPHIA -- The uproar in the Islamic world over Danish cartoons lampooning the prophet Mohammed reminds us that much of that world misunderstands what democracy means. A Danish newspaper published the 12 cartoons in September. One showed the prophet with a turban made of explosives; in another, he greets a line of suicide bombers in heaven with the words, "Stop, stop, we have run out of virgins." The drawings have inspired protests from Muslim presidents, Arab boycotts of Danish goods, Pakistani demonstrations that torched the Danish flag and calls by Gaza imams to sever the hands of the artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Adam Gutekunst and Dustin Levy and For The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
Hundreds of "My Little Pony" collectibles cover Steve Lucia's bedroom - plush toys, comic books, trading cards and T-shirts. It is a sea of pink and purple, a shrine to a TV show originally intended for young girls. But Lucia is a 25-year-old man, an electrician who lives in a Pasadena duplex and has what he calls a "healthy obsession. " "Being in the construction industry, there are guys who sit around and talk about women all day long," Lucia said. "I go home and wrap myself in ponies.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | July 16, 2013
Editor: Rev. Donte' L. Hickman's recent criticisms of your editorial cartoon were totally unfounded. No one here is hiding behind children or exploiting them for a more "pervasive" agenda. To come into this community and accuse us of racism and exploiting children is not how you win friends and influence people. These kids started this Save Our Pool campaign on their own. They wanted their pool opened so they decided to contact our local Council Representative and ask him to help the County find a way to purchase the property or open the pool.
NEWS
June 25, 2013
As a Marine Corps veteran of World War II, I want a piece of Kevin Kallaugher for his insulting characterization of the U.S. role in Afghanistan ("Chasing the Taliban," June 23). The audacity of KAL to view the operation in Afghanistan as a defeat by an enemy who didn't wear a uniform to identify themselves from the general population is unforgivable. Jim Levendusky, Phoenix
NEWS
April 22, 2013
We are appalled at the KAL cartoon published in The Sun on Sunday, April 14. Dr. Ben Carson is a man to be admired, not criticized. He apologized to the gay community for his unfortunate remarks. We need more men like Dr. Carson in this world. He'd definitely have our votes, should he decide to run for any political office. Ronald and Vivian Fortner
EXPLORE
April 8, 2013
The March 28 edition of the Howard County Times had an editorial concerning the General Assembly's increase in the gas tax. It was noted that the Transportation Trust Fund's "lockbox" isn't very securely locked. The accompanying editorial cartoon indicated that the Times believes that diversion of funds from the lockbox is a question of "when," not "if. " One wonders how long it will before elected officials propose non-transportation use of the funds. Let's see - that would be immediately after passing the bill.
EXPLORE
February 4, 2013
The editorial cartoon in the Jan. 24 editor of the Columbia Flier, "Tuning up Symphony Woods," makes no clear statement, except one against its quality. The being pictured "tuning up" a music note lacks any features identifying as a creature of this planet. Its face lacks a mouth, eye or nose. It seems to be the end result of a gorilla-rat love affair. The unidentified species seems to be using a tuning fork to tune the contents of a musical note. This does not portray any coherent message at all. Is the Arts District trying to make all trees in Symphony Woods be in tune?
NEWS
By ALBERT R. WYNN | February 13, 2006
WASHINGTON -- All of us are quick to deplore the recent violence in the Middle East, Afghanistan and Asia that occurred in response to published cartoons of the prophet Muhammad in a Danish newspaper. These cartoons were subsequently reprinted in French, Spanish and German newspapers, allegedly in defense of free speech. However, if Americans are serious about improving their relationship with Arab countries and the Muslim community, we should be quick to condemn the deliberately irresponsible, outrageous and hateful journalistic lampooning of the Muslim world's prophet.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | October 31, 2012
A daddy blogger wrote this month that the Halloween video "It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown" should be retired from viewing by this generation of kids because its title character is bullied and harassed throughout. Charlie Brown's friends call him a blockhead, and even the adults are mean to him - while the other kids get candy in their treat bags, Charlie Brown gets rocks. "My boys are 5 and 2. Young kids," said Buzz Bishop, the writer behind DadCamp on Babble.com . "They're at the age where words like "stupid" and "dumb" are as bad as a four letter word that rhymes with fire truck.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2012
Cortly "C.D. " Witherspoon, a Baltimore minister and activist, has been scoping out convenience stores that sell products such as "Scooby Snax. " The glossy package features a picture of a dazed-looking cartoon character, Scooby Doo. A sticker advises that the contents have a blueberry flavor, though the package contains dried herbs, not candy. The minister's mission has been to get such products out of the hands of Baltimore's youth, who are smoking the stuff in hopes of getting high.
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