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By Julie Lynem and Julie Lynem,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 28, 1993
Remember the days when a dollar bought more than a candy bar and Fred and Wilma were the hottest couple on television? When life was simple and Bugs Bunny was as cool as bell-bottoms?Cartoon characters like the Flintstones, the Jetsons and Bugs were big hits with baby boomers then, and still are. That's why the Deluxe Corp. is targeting boomers with its Stars collection check package, which is available through participating financial institutions.Deluxe is banking on checks featuring cartoon and comic strip characters B. C., Bugs Bunny and Friends, the Flintstones, Ziggy, Garfield, the Jetsons and the Simpsons.
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NEWS
June 16, 2012
Your recent editorial "Doing better than 'fine'" (June 12) must be a joke. Every economic metric shows the economy is in serious trouble. Small businesses are doing much worse than anticipated almost four years after the start of the Great Recession, and there's no recovery in sight. I should know, because I am a small business owner, and I am in contact with other small business owners on a regular basis. We are not doing "fine," we and our employees are struggling to survive in a business climate that has already claimed the existence of more businesses both large and small than ever before.
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By Zap2it.com | October 7, 2003
They're not rude, antisocial, alcoholics all bickering and desperately trying to hook up with each other. They're just drawn that way. Comedy Central has given a green light to what the network describes as "television's first animated reality series." Launching in October 2004, Drawn Together will answer the question of what happens when eight completely different cartoon characters from various genres and styles live together and have their lives filmed for the entire world to see. "While very much a character driven comedy with a tendency toward melodramatic outbursts, some of the humor in Drawn Together will come from the viewers' familiarity with reality television and the show's ability to poke holes in the well-known conventions found in these shows," says Lauren Corrao, the cable network's development head.
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By Zap2it.com | October 7, 2003
They're not rude, antisocial, alcoholics all bickering and desperately trying to hook up with each other. They're just drawn that way. Comedy Central has given a green light to what the network describes as "television's first animated reality series." Launching in October 2004, Drawn Together will answer the question of what happens when eight completely different cartoon characters from various genres and styles live together and have their lives filmed for the entire world to see. "While very much a character driven comedy with a tendency toward melodramatic outbursts, some of the humor in Drawn Together will come from the viewers' familiarity with reality television and the show's ability to poke holes in the well-known conventions found in these shows," says Lauren Corrao, the cable network's development head.
FEATURES
By N.Y. Times News Service | September 20, 1990
LOS ANGELES -- The former owner of a Burbank chocolate shop has been indicted on charges stemming from the theft of $1 million in celluloid overlays depicting well-known Warner Bros. cartoon characters.Billy Carmen, 31, of suburban Studio City, was charged with three counts of transporting stolen property in connection with the 1988 theft of hundreds of film overlays, or "cels," portraying Daffy Duck, Bugs Bunny, Elmer Fudd and other cartoon stars, federal prosecutors said yesterday.Carmen is suspected of selling the cels to East Coast art dealers.
FEATURES
By Bill Hendrick and Bill Hendrick,COX NEWS SERVICE | August 19, 1997
CHICAGO -- We may have come a long way, baby, from the days of Betty Boop, but females are still portrayed as dummies in television cartoons, and this isn't good for our kids, researchers said Sunday.Male cartoon characters still outnumber female cartoon personalities by 4-1, exactly the same as in the '70s, when sexism dominated the airwaves even more than today, Drs. Mary Hudak and Cynthia Spicher of Allegheny College told participants at the 105th annual meeting of the American Psychological Association.
NEWS
June 16, 2012
Your recent editorial "Doing better than 'fine'" (June 12) must be a joke. Every economic metric shows the economy is in serious trouble. Small businesses are doing much worse than anticipated almost four years after the start of the Great Recession, and there's no recovery in sight. I should know, because I am a small business owner, and I am in contact with other small business owners on a regular basis. We are not doing "fine," we and our employees are struggling to survive in a business climate that has already claimed the existence of more businesses both large and small than ever before.
NEWS
July 6, 1994
* Alfred Harvey, 80, who brought such cartoon characters as Casper the Friendly Ghost and Richie Rich the Poor Little Rich Boy to newsstands and TV and movie screens, died Monday in Larchmont, N.Y. His company, Harvey World Famous Comics, produced comic books and cartoons featuring such characters as Wendy the Good Little Witch; Spooky the Tuff Little Ghost; Baby Huey; Little Audrey; and Little Dot. It also published "Sad Sack," the military comic strip....
NEWS
By Anita Tosti-Hendawi | August 9, 1993
I GREW up years ago, long before ice cream trucks. There was no electronic music box to be heard blocks away on a hot summer's night, no white vehicle plastered with pictures of the items for sale and cartoon characters (including the celebrity's mouth that formed the trash hole).Instead, there was a simple horse-drawn wagon driven by a stout man who rang a tinny bell just loud enough to send children in the immediate vicinity scampering. Timing was everything. He would not wait.We would scurry to our parents for a reward, a handout.
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By Doug Nye and Doug Nye,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | August 8, 1995
Boop-oop-a-doop!Whenever moviegoers of the 1930s heard that phrase, the image of a cute, curvaceous flapper with short skirt and low-cut blouse quickly came to mind.She was Betty Boop, the sexiest cartoon character to ever wiggle across the movie screen.The creation of animation pioneer Max Fleischer and his brother Dave, Betty Boop has become a legendary figure (pun intended) in the world of movie cartoons. In recent years, there has been renewed interest in her screen adventures, and today you can find her image on T-shirts, coffee cups and dozens of other items.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | September 27, 2002
A new heroine is blossoming in Annapolis. She's feminine, she's floral - and she's unforgiving about litter. Meet Lacey Anne Regina, the Queen Anne's Lace leader of a new squad of cartoon characters that could soon adorn many of the state capital's trash cans in an effort to keep streets litter-free. The campaign is the latest flower-oriented initiative of Mayor Ellen O. Moyer, who has been known to pluck weeds on her strolls around town and drive around for weeks with boxes of daffodil bulbs in her car. One of Moyer's first acts as mayor was to replace the city's Lady Justice seal with its rose and thistle flag on City Hall letterhead.
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By Roger Catlin and Roger Catlin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 30, 2002
Cartoon Network has dusted off one of Hanna-Barbera's worst-conceived superhero characters, Birdman, and given him new life, as was done for Space Ghost before him. Instead of a clueless, argumentative talk-show host, Birdman has been reincarnated as the loopy Harvey Birdman, Attorney at Law. His cases are those that cartoon fans have pondered for ages: Were Scooby-Doo and his crew stoned all the time? Is that what caused the constant hunger for snacks? What exactly was the relationship between Dr. Quest and Race Bannon on Jonny Quest?
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | September 3, 2000
Sugar. Spice. Everything nice. These are the ingredients used to create the hottest, hippest cartoon show for girls since, since -- well, since maybe ever. You can keep your Transformers, your X-Men and your Pokemon. At the Fullerton home of Chelsea and Tess Larichiuta, ages 8 and 9, the only must-watch TV show features three kindergartners with peculiarly large eyes who thwart evil-doers during recess. Namely, "The Powerpuff Girls." The show's main characters, Blossom, Buttercup and Bubbles, were created in a lab by the kind-hearted Professor Utonium in a quest to create the perfect little girls.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2000
Ever wonder where that Wascally Wabbit came from? Tomorrow night on cable's Cartoon Network, an hour's worth of rare animated shorts from Warner Bros. studios, including several not seen anywhere for decades, will air as a special episode of "ToonHeads," a weekly showcase of classic cartoons. And while much of what can be seen on "The Lost Cartoons" are only pieces of a whole, the hour is still one that animation fans shouldn't miss. When Warner decided to venture into animation in the late '20s under producer Leon Schlesinger (whose slight lisp was said to be the inspiration for Daffy Duck's voice)
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 24, 1999
Is a second Golden Age of animation upon us?In a year when "The Iron Giant" was tragically overlooked by family audiences and "Pokemon: The First Movie" was giving Japanese animation a bad name, here come two movies that prove once again how ingenious, artful and flat-out entertaining animation can be. In radically different ways, "Toy Story 2" and "Princess Mononoke" bring the art form back to its roots as a medium meant for for general audiences, not...
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 27, 1999
"When it comes to matters of the heart, or even more, matters of sex, men are cartoon characters," comments one of the two female characters in John Patrick Shanley's comedy, "Psychopathia Sexualis," which is receiving its Baltimore premiere at Fell's Point Corner Theatre.Shanley -- best known as the Academy Award-winning screenwriter of "Moonstruck" -- named his 1996 play after the classic 19th century study of sexual aberrations by German psychiatrist Krafft-Ebing. But despite its serious-sounding title, Shanley's entire comedy -- not just his male characters -- is an extended cartoon, and not an extremely funny one at that.
NEWS
By Anna Quindlen | April 14, 1992
I FEEL like one of those cartoon characters who has a little angel on one shoulder and a little devil on the other. The reporter -- the one some people would say is carrying the pitchfork -- says one thing, the human being another. There's a lot of this going around.The subject is Arthur Ashe; the news is AIDS. This week the gentleman tennis player became a reluctant symbol. He had known since 1988 that he'd been infected by a transfusion, but he and his wife and a few close friends kept the secret for an obvious reason: they feared the shunning.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | September 14, 1991
Once upon a time in children's television land, we had our cartoon characters, such as Tom & Jerry, Huckleberry Hound and Bugs Bunny. And we had real people or actors doing roles -- Lassie's boy Timmy and Rin Tin Tin's boy Rusty, and more recently the Hudson Brothers, Marshall, Will and Holly, and Pee-wee Herman.But as another fall TV season arrives, the networks are competing for pint-sized viewers in the kiddie prime-time hours of Saturday morning with a dismaying mixed-media mix of pop culture figures in depressingly uncreative, mostly animated vehicles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 31, 1999
Network television is in the midst of a major toon-up. There are already more cartoons in prime time than ever before, and the number will double by the time the season ends in May.Last week, we saw the successful launch of "Dilbert" on UPN. Tonight, after the Super Bowl in one of the great showcases of network TV, Fox will debut yet another animated series, "Family Guy." Earlier in the month, Fox premiered "The PJs" from Eddie Murphy, which quickly became one of the most-talked-about shows of the year.
FEATURES
By Gene Seymour and Gene Seymour,NEWSDAY | December 21, 1998
Jeffrey Katzenberg says it's the "most demanding, absolutely hardest job that any actor can be asked to do." He's referring to the process of making one's voice fit an animated cartoon character.At first, you're tempted to think, well, Jeffrey Katzenberg would say that. As a guiding spirit behind the explosion of full-length animated features that's resounded throughout the '90s, Katzenberg feels an understandable propriety toward the whole process of building the perfect big-screen cartoon.
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