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By Los Angeles Times | May 7, 1996
ANAHEIM, Calif. -- An MRI exam on California Angels pitcher Mark Langston's right knee yesterday showed a slight cartilage tear, but doctors won't determine until today whether the left-hander will need arthroscopic surgery.Surgery probably would result in at least a three-week stint on the disabled list for Langston, who will be examined by team physician Lewis Yocum. The other treatment option: Rest and hope the knee heals.Manager Marcel Lachemann said there's an "outside chance" Langston, scratched from Sunday's game against Minnesota, will make his next scheduled start Friday against Cleveland.
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By Everett Cook and The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2012
The Orioles have placed infielder Wilson Betemit on the 15-day disabled list after an MRI taken before Thursday's game showed a small cartilage tear in his right wrist and a deep bone bruise. First baseman Joe Mahoney was called up from Triple-A Norfolk to replace Betemit on the roster. Betemit hadn't played in a game since Saturday. Before the call-up of rookie Manny Machado last week, Betemit had become the team's everyday third baseman. The switch-hitting Betemit has been one of the club's best hitters against right-handed pitching, batting .306 from the left side of the plate.
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By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | May 13, 1993
Washington Bullets center Pervis Ellison, who missed the final 28 games of the 1992-93 season with a strained left knee, underwent successful arthroscopic surgery on Tuesday to remove cartilage from both knees.Ellison will spend the next 12 weeks in a rehabilitation program designed by the team's medical staff. It is expected that he will be back on the court by August, and that he will be able to rejoin the Bullets in their October training camp.Hampered by leg problems since his rookie year in Sacramento after the Kings made him the No. 1 pick in the 1988 draft, Ellison played in only 49 games this past season.
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By Dan Connolly | July 14, 2012
The Orioles got both good and bad news from a MRI taken Saturday on pitcher Jason Hammel's painful right knee, which forced him out of Friday's game in the fourth inning. There is no new damage, but loose-body cartilage has floated in a knee joint causing continual pain. He'll miss at least one start, but is leaning toward getting arthroscopic surgery that would land him on the disabled list and potentially sideline him until September. “Where [the loose cartilage] was before it was kind of uncomfortable,” Hammel said.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 13, 2007
SAN DIEGO -- Osiris Therapeutics' experimental stem cell treatment for patients with damage to the knee cartilage, or meniscus, didn't stimulate growth of new cartilage in 55 patients taking part in a clinical study, the company said yesterday. About a third of the patients treated with the stem cell product, called Chondrogen, did show signs of reversal of arthritis symptoms, said C. Randal Mills, chief executive officer of the Baltimore company, in an interview yesterday at a stem cell conference in San Diego.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing Writer United Features Syndicate | November 2, 1993
Most people who have injured the cartilage in their knees are better off not running or jumping for the rest of their lives, but rather relying on other low-impact exercises to maintain physical fitness.At your knee, two bones meet and are held together by four bands, two on the outside and two on the inside. The ends of bones are soft, and they are protected by cartilage, which is a tough, thick white gristle. Cartilage can break when it is subjected to a strong force such as might happen when you are hit on the knee or unexpectedly step into a hole.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | February 15, 1997
A surgeon with the Helix Health System in Baltimore has begun using a controversial procedure to repair knees in which cartilage is removed, expanded in a laboratory and put back into the knee.The technique has been hotly debated in the United States since its introduction two years ago, some surgeons praising it as a good alternative for some hobbled patients and others criticizing its commercialization.Doctors with Helix say it is suitable for a small proportion -- perhaps 2 percent -- of patients with damaged knee cartilage who have exhausted conventional therapies and are too young for knee replacements.
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By Wallace Matthews and Wallace Matthews,Newsday | October 20, 1991
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. -- Happy Birthday, Evander. You just lost $30 million.Mike Tyson has pulled out of his Nov. 8 fight with undisputed heavyweight champion Evander Holyfield due to what was being described as a "non-contact cartilage injury" to his left rib cage.Yesterday was Holyfield's 29th birthday, and it is safe to assume it was not be a happy one."This has been a very tough fight, and it's not getting any better," said Holyfield's manager, Shelly Finkel, who tried unsuccessfully to reach Holyfield Friday night and left a message on his telephone answering machine that the fight was off.Tyson was originally injured in training Oct. 8 and went to a Las Vegas clinic for X-rays, which were said to be negative.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | March 22, 2008
GAITHERSBURG -- Using light waves, polymers and a nuclear reactor, researchers here are investigating a superstrong, experimental gel that might some day turn into a novel treatment for millions of people who suffer from arthritis. Scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology have spent two years shooting neutron beams at the mysterious hydrogel, trying to determine why it is almost as strong, flexible and resistant to friction as the cartilage in the human knee. The polymers in the gel - formed when synthetic molecules are struck by ultraviolet light - were developed by researchers at Hokkaido University in Japan in 2003.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN REPORTER | May 15, 2008
Orioles reliever Jim Hoey won't pitch this season after undergoing surgery May 4 in Baltimore to repair torn cartilage and clean out debris from his right shoulder. Hoey, who appeared in 23 games with the Orioles last year, assumed that the arthroscopic procedure only would involve removing debris from the shoulder after magnetic resonance imagings and an arthrogram - when dye is injected in the affected area - didn't reveal any tears. But team orthopedist Dr. James Wilckens discovered a tear of the labrum behind the pitcher's shoulder that was significant enough to require three anchors to hold it down.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,liz.atwood@baltsun.com | March 9, 2009
Arthritis affects almost 80 percent of Americans. And those affected are getting younger, according to Dr. Barry Waldman of OrthoMaryland and director of the Center for Joint Preservation and Replacement at the Rubin Institute for Advanced Orthopedics at Sinai Hospital. "We don't really know why, but we're seeing an epidemic of patients with wearing out of joints in their 40s and even late 30s." But the good news, Waldman says, is that diet and exercise are the best ways to treat the disease.
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By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,Sun reporter | June 28, 2008
Washington -- The Orioles got the worst possible news on the health of Matt Albers. A magnetic resonance imaging of the right-hander's pitching shoulder revealed yesterday that he has a torn labrum, an injury that could cause him to miss the rest of the season. Albers, who was not available to comment yesterday, is considering whether to rehabilitate the injured cartilage, which would keep him sidelined for the next two months, or to have season-ending surgery. If Albers, 25, has the surgery, he won't be on the mound for eight or nine months, manager Dave Trembley said.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN REPORTER | May 15, 2008
Orioles reliever Jim Hoey won't pitch this season after undergoing surgery May 4 in Baltimore to repair torn cartilage and clean out debris from his right shoulder. Hoey, who appeared in 23 games with the Orioles last year, assumed that the arthroscopic procedure only would involve removing debris from the shoulder after magnetic resonance imagings and an arthrogram - when dye is injected in the affected area - didn't reveal any tears. But team orthopedist Dr. James Wilckens discovered a tear of the labrum behind the pitcher's shoulder that was significant enough to require three anchors to hold it down.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | March 22, 2008
GAITHERSBURG -- Using light waves, polymers and a nuclear reactor, researchers here are investigating a superstrong, experimental gel that might some day turn into a novel treatment for millions of people who suffer from arthritis. Scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology have spent two years shooting neutron beams at the mysterious hydrogel, trying to determine why it is almost as strong, flexible and resistant to friction as the cartilage in the human knee. The polymers in the gel - formed when synthetic molecules are struck by ultraviolet light - were developed by researchers at Hokkaido University in Japan in 2003.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | September 16, 2007
I am over 50 and sometimes I feel like I am breaking down, one joint at a time. My hip hurts. My knee hurts. But it's my thumb that really hurts. The pain at the base of my left thumb is so great that sometimes I can't button a shirt, open a jar or grip the steering wheel in my car. I am pretty sure it is the result of using my thumb to hook my purse up and over my shoulder 10 times a day for 30 years. But the doctors can't say for sure. And, typical for my lowest-common-denominator life, I am suffering from a type of arthritis that is just about epidemic among women my age. Dr. Thomas J. Graham, chief surgeon at the Curtis National Hand Center at Union Memorial Hospital and the physician who examined my hand, said that surgery on the basilar joint of the thumb may soon eclipse knee and hip replacements and is perhaps the most common procedure hand surgeons perform.
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By Sirage Yassin and Sirage Yassin,Sun Reporter | June 24, 2007
Here was Bucky Lasek, the hometown draw and Baltimore's biggest action sports star, trying to decide which bum knee was more deserving of the blame: the left knee, the one suffering from cartilage issues that will cause him to have surgery tomorrow, or the right knee, which had to compensate its counterpart. "I paid the price today. It was bruised; it was tight. I had no power," said Lasek, 34, about the knee that bothered him in the skateboard vert finals of the Panasonic Open yesterday.
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By Jonathan Bor | March 10, 2001
Osteoarthritis of the hip is the breakdown of cartilage that lines the hip socket. Cartilage is a thin, slick substance that buffers the joint, allowing people to flex and bear weight without pain. Once the cartilage deteriorates, people experience intense pain and stiffness that comes from bone grinding against bone. Cartilage has no blood supply, nerves or lymph system. This makes it a great buffer, but also makes it incapable of healing once damaged. The condition affects millions of Americans, particularly the elderly, but also the young.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2004
JUPITER, Fla. - The Orioles reported to spring training with a surplus of second basemen. The challenge is getting through the last two weeks before they run out. A magnetic resonance imaging test on Mark McLemore's right knee yesterday confirmed a cartilage tear. He will need arthroscopic surgery and is expected to miss six to eight weeks. McLemore suffered the injury while rounding first base in Friday's game against the Los Angeles Dodgers in Fort Lauderdale. Team physician Dr. Charles Silberstein examined McLemore, and after a radiologist checked the results of yesterday's MRI, the Orioles' roster underwent another change.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | February 21, 2007
After disappointing drug results and a stock downgrade from a major financial firm, Osiris Therapeutics Inc. detailed yesterday how it doubled its loss last year, blaming increased clinical trial efforts and charges associated with its initial public offering of stock in August. Loss for the year was $45 million, compared with $20 million in 2005. For the quarter that ended Dec. 31, the company lost $12.7 million, compared with $8.1 million for the final quarter of 2005. The earnings information, first detailed in a news release late Monday and then discussed during a conference call with analysts yesterday morning, didn't do much to move investors.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | February 14, 2007
Shares of Osiris Therapeutics fell 10 percent yesterday after the company announced that one of its adult stem cell drugs doesn't regenerate knee cartilage as expected. Still, Osiris said the therapy may have uses as an osteoarthritis treatment, according to minimal, undetailed data. It's the first significant disappointment the Baltimore business has had in a while, having gone public in the summer in one of last year's more successful biotech launches. Late Monday, the company issued a news release saying six months of early-stage clinical trials involving 55 patients have shown that the injectable adult stem cell drug, Chondragen, is ineffective at regrowing a crescent-shaped piece of knee cartilage called the meniscus.
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