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By GREG GARLAND and GREG GARLAND,SUN REPORTER | December 3, 2005
The advisory board for a center for juvenile offenders on the Eastern Shore is protesting the state's decision to transfer youths there from the Charles H. Hickey Jr. School, saying the center is already crowded. John E. Nunn III, who heads the advisory board of the state-run J. DeWeese Carter Center in Chestertown, wrote Juvenile Services Secretary Kenneth C. Montague Jr. on Nov. 18 to express the panel's concerns. The Carter Center is "overcrowded and understaffed," Nunn wrote, saying 27 youths were being housed at a facility designed for 15. "They are bringing in more kids and don't have enough people to run this facility now," said Nunn, a Kent County public defender, in an interview.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2013
The old low-income Hilltop Housing project in Ellicott City has given way to another world: new apartments with facades of soft-colored siding and stone, and a recreation center with the latest in exercise gear, including a retractable-roof indoor swimming pool. Gone are the brick low-rise buildings put up around 1970 that were not aging gracefully, along with the public housing policy that made them possible. The county is moving away from the practice of building apartment complexes strictly for low-income people, in part because of the lack of government money to support projects that cannot be sustained by people paying below market-rate rents.
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NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2000
Baltimore County police continued to search yesterday for a 32-year-old Middle River man who eluded officers Thursday in the woods near the Baltimore County-Harford County line while under surveillance. Initially, police used dogs and helicopters to search for Levi Woods, who is wanted in connection with parole violations. But by yesterday, police said they were making routine patrols of the area where he disappeared. Police had obtained an arrest warrant for Woods in connection with parole violations stemming from the armed robbery of a bank on East Joppa Road in Towson in September 1995.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 26, 2011
Dr. Betty W. Robinson, a psychiatrist who had been director of inpatient services at the Walter P. Carter Center in downtown Baltimore and an associate professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, died June 19 of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The longtime Stoneleigh resident was 84. The daughter of a Baltimore & Ohio Railroad office worker and a bookkeeper, Betty Lee Wilmas was born and raised in St. Louis, where she graduated in 1944 from Wills High School.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1996
Carol Wheeler Bell, a forensic psychiatric social worker at the Walter P. Carter Center for 17 years, died Monday at Johns Hopkins Hospital from complications of scleroderma. She was 66 and lived in Columbia.Mrs. Bell improved programs to treat patients committed to PTC Carter Center by the court system. The hospital is a state-run, inpatient psychiatric facility on Fayette Street downtown.When health problems forced her to retire this year, Mrs. Bell was preparing -- at the center's request -- a manual detailing the policies and procedures she had developed over the years.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | January 15, 1999
BEIJING -- Election observers from the Carter Center in Atlanta broke yesterday from their previous upbeat assessments of local elections in China, issuing a largely negative report on balloting they found riddled with "irregularities in almost all stages."Despite the drawbacks, observers applauded the enthusiasm of Chinese voters.And at least some were perplexed that China has maintained this sliver of openness when it is in the midst of a crackdown on pro-democracy activists in the big cities.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 19, 2004
CARACAS, Venezuela - After demanding an audit of voting results upon failing to oust President Hugo Chavez in a recall referendum, representatives of Venezuela's opposition movement said yesterday that they would refuse to participate in or recognize the review, asserting that the audit would fail to detect the deception that they insist took place. The opposition has not offered solid evidence of wrongdoing to the Organization of American States or to the Carter Center - monitors of the 18-hour recall election Sunday, in which Venezuelans voted by a large margin to keep Chavez as their leader.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 28, 2001
In Baltimore City Arundel man, 65, dies after truck runs over him A 65-year-old Anne Arundel County man, who was repairing the brakes on his tractor-trailer on the shoulder of Interstate 895, was killed yesterday when the rig drifted forward and ran over him, Maryland Transportation Authority police said. Thomas Martin, of the 400 block of Pineway Drive in Glen Burnie, was run over about 6:30 a.m. and pronounced dead at 2:55 p.m. at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, police said. Cpl. Gregory Prioleau said Martin had stopped his truck, loaded with paper, on the entrance ramp from Lombard Street to I-895.
NEWS
April 7, 2006
Brawl breaks out at juvenile center State and local police were called in to break up a fracas at a juvenile detention center in Chestertown early yesterday involving 18 youths - nearly the entire population of the center, authorities said. Seven youths at the J. DeWeese Carter Center reported receiving minor injuries, mostly bumps, bruises and scrapes, said Edward Hopkins, a spokesman for the Department of Juvenile Services. He said that two staff members were sent to a hospital to be checked for possible fractures of the hands or fingers, and two other staff members were "shaken up" by the incident.
FEATURES
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2000
A politician in Zimbabwe recently had this to say about the electoral mess in Florida: "Imagine that we read of an election occurring anywhere in the third world in which the self-declared winner was the son of the former prime minister and that former prime minister was himself the former head of that nation's secret police (the CIA). Imagine that the self-declared winner lost the popular vote but won based on some old colonial holdover from the nation's pre-democracy past (the electoral college)
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | January 28, 2009
Maryland officials plan to close Baltimore's only public psychiatric hospital, relocating some patients to state facilities in Anne Arundel and Baltimore counties while forcing outpatient alcohol and drug treatment programs housed there to find new homes. The plan, detailed in Gov. Martin O'Malley's budget for next year, calls for shuttering the 51-bed in- patient facility at the Walter P. Carter Center downtown. Outpatient mental health programs, which serve thousands throughout the city, will have to move elsewhere by July 2010, when officials plan to close the center.
NEWS
April 7, 2006
Brawl breaks out at juvenile center State and local police were called in to break up a fracas at a juvenile detention center in Chestertown early yesterday involving 18 youths - nearly the entire population of the center, authorities said. Seven youths at the J. DeWeese Carter Center reported receiving minor injuries, mostly bumps, bruises and scrapes, said Edward Hopkins, a spokesman for the Department of Juvenile Services. He said that two staff members were sent to a hospital to be checked for possible fractures of the hands or fingers, and two other staff members were "shaken up" by the incident.
NEWS
By GREG GARLAND and GREG GARLAND,SUN REPORTER | December 3, 2005
The advisory board for a center for juvenile offenders on the Eastern Shore is protesting the state's decision to transfer youths there from the Charles H. Hickey Jr. School, saying the center is already crowded. John E. Nunn III, who heads the advisory board of the state-run J. DeWeese Carter Center in Chestertown, wrote Juvenile Services Secretary Kenneth C. Montague Jr. on Nov. 18 to express the panel's concerns. The Carter Center is "overcrowded and understaffed," Nunn wrote, saying 27 youths were being housed at a facility designed for 15. "They are bringing in more kids and don't have enough people to run this facility now," said Nunn, a Kent County public defender, in an interview.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTER | November 30, 2005
Teiana Underwood, a 14-year-old freshman at Centennial High School, says that she has to churn out up to five essays a week. "They must be typed," said Underwood, who does not have a computer at home and previously had to type her assignments on one of two computers shared by dozens of students at an after-school program. "In high school, I have to print out all of my essays." Underwood's plight got a little easier this month when she and the 55 other students who attend the Homework Club in the Roger Carter Recreation Center and nearby Hilltop Community Center in Ellicott City got access to eight new computers and Internet service, courtesy of corporate and service organization donors.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2005
On the face of it, the two teachers who run the Upton School's program in a downtown psychiatric hospital appear to have one of the worst public school teaching assignments in Baltimore. Their classes are made up of teenagers who have been expelled from city schools for the most serious offenses in the rule book: possessing a large amount of marijuana, bringing a weapon to school, setting a fire, stabbing a fellow student. To reach their classroom, the teachers walk through a metal detector at the front door of the Walter P. Carter Center, crossing paths in the lobby with patients on their way to treatment, some arriving from jail with their hands and legs in chains.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 19, 2004
CARACAS, Venezuela - After demanding an audit of voting results upon failing to oust President Hugo Chavez in a recall referendum, representatives of Venezuela's opposition movement said yesterday that they would refuse to participate in or recognize the review, asserting that the audit would fail to detect the deception that they insist took place. The opposition has not offered solid evidence of wrongdoing to the Organization of American States or to the Carter Center - monitors of the 18-hour recall election Sunday, in which Venezuelans voted by a large margin to keep Chavez as their leader.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | January 28, 2009
Maryland officials plan to close Baltimore's only public psychiatric hospital, relocating some patients to state facilities in Anne Arundel and Baltimore counties while forcing outpatient alcohol and drug treatment programs housed there to find new homes. The plan, detailed in Gov. Martin O'Malley's budget for next year, calls for shuttering the 51-bed in- patient facility at the Walter P. Carter Center downtown. Outpatient mental health programs, which serve thousands throughout the city, will have to move elsewhere by July 2010, when officials plan to close the center.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTER | November 30, 2005
Teiana Underwood, a 14-year-old freshman at Centennial High School, says that she has to churn out up to five essays a week. "They must be typed," said Underwood, who does not have a computer at home and previously had to type her assignments on one of two computers shared by dozens of students at an after-school program. "In high school, I have to print out all of my essays." Underwood's plight got a little easier this month when she and the 55 other students who attend the Homework Club in the Roger Carter Recreation Center and nearby Hilltop Community Center in Ellicott City got access to eight new computers and Internet service, courtesy of corporate and service organization donors.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2003
Maryland's top health official proposed yesterday to shrink the state's mental health system by closing the 90-year-old Crownsville Hospital Center in Anne Arundel County and privatizing the Walter P. Carter Center in downtown Baltimore. Shutting Crownsville would force the state to relocate its 200 patients to other facilities and could prompt about 150 layoffs, according to a report by Health Secretary Nelson J. Sabatini. It would also save $5.3 million per year for a state facing an $800 million shortfall next budget year.
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