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By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 6, 2000
DETROIT -- General Motors Corp.'s sales of North American-built cars and light trucks rose 6.5 percent in December, capping the industry's record year, but Ford Motor Co.'s sales fell 1.4 percent as discounts did little to stop the market share gains of Asian and European rivals. For the year, GM's total sales including imports and heavy trucks rose 9 percent, while Ford's climbed 6.1 percent to break a 21-year-old record. DaimlerChrysler AG, Toyota Motor Corp. and Honda Motor Co. reported annual records Tuesday.
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NEWS
February 7, 2013
In case you somehow missed it, though we don't know you possibly could have, Harford County turned purple during the last month, Baltimore Ravens Purple. Schools, storefronts, homes, government buildings, every conceivable business, piece of public art, baked goods and thousands of cars and trucks, all have all been adorned with the colors of the Super Bowl XLVII Champions. And, who among us in Harford hasn't donned the purple and black, as we cheered our team to the victory, many of us also outfitting our dogs, cats and other pets in similar attire.
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NEWS
May 13, 2011
A recent article ("Demand, not speculation, cited for rising oil prices," May 8) underscored the need to build cars and trucks that guzzle less gas. In the coming months, President Obama has an opportunity to break our oil dependence, save Marylanders money at the gas pump, and cut dangerous emissions by setting strong new fuel efficiency and global warming pollution standards for cars and trucks. Transportation accounts for more than half of the oil Americans use, so making more efficient cars and trucks is the easiest way to save Marylanders money on gas while reducing our oil dependence.
EXPLORE
September 12, 2012
Check out the fine display of cars, trucks and motorcycles at the Endless Summer Car, Bike and Truck Show, Sat., Sept. 15, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the Laurel Municipal Center, 8103 Sandy Spring Road. Hosted by the Laurel Lions Club, the event includes trophies, dash plaques, goody bags, 50/50 raffle, music, food, vendors, flea market and games for kids. All proceeds go back to the Laurel community through the charitable works of the Laurel Lions Foundation. For information, go to laurelions.org .
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | May 14, 1996
About 50 battery- and solar-powered vehicles will swing through Maryland today and tomorrow as part of the Tour de Sol, a weeklong road rally from New York City to Washington to demonstrate the practicality of electric cars and trucks.The vehicles, which set out from New York on Sunday, are scheduled to reach Chesapeake City in Cecil County this morning, after departing from Pottstown, Pa. They will travel south on the Eastern Shore tomorrow and cross the Bay Bridge to Sandy Point State Park, where the cars and trucks will be on display overnight.
BUSINESS
By Amy Harmon and Amy Harmon,Los Angeles Times | May 5, 1991
DETROIT -- April sales of cars and trucks tumbled 17.9 percent from a year ago, automakers reported Friday, crushing any hopes that the slight quickening of the sales pace in March was the beginning of a steady recovery.Imported and domestically built vehicles sold at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 11.2 million, down from March's more encouraging 12.4 million. Battered by war, recession and drooping consumer confidence, auto sales have been depressed for almost a year. In April 1990, vehicles sold at an annual rate of 13.8 million.
FEATURES
By Michael McGehee | March 19, 1998
"Frogger" is a new, 3-D version of a game that was popular in arcades 20 years ago.Just like in the original, the object in the first level of the game is to guide a frog across a busy highway and over a river. What starts as a simple mission gets complicated when tons of cars and trucks start whizzing by. Frogger is a surprisingly addictive game that is challenging and fun.Pub Date: 3/19/98
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News Sun staff writer Ted Shelsby contributed to this article | November 5, 1994
DETROIT -- General Motors Corp. said yesterday that it plans to cut fourth-quarter production in the United States and Canada by almost 50,000 cars and trucks, blaming the effects of material shortages and a strike as well as a slow build rate for new vehicles.GM has ratcheted down production forecasts steadily since September. Yesterday's estimate marks a cut of another 14,000 from its early October estimate of 1,420,131 vehicles.Plans now call for GM to make 1,406,138 cars and trucks at its U.S. and Canadian assembly plants in the fourth quarter.
NEWS
June 14, 2011
Extreme weather is on the rise ("Maryland braces for second heat wave," June 7). Maryland's heat wave is just one example, and scientists predict these extreme events will become increasingly common due to global warming. Heat waves are actually more lethal than other extreme events and pose greater danger to at-risk groups. In our recent report, "Global Warming and Extreme Weather," we found the number of heat waves has gone up since 1960, while 2010 is tied for the warmest year on record.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | January 26, 1993
A New York court ruling has cast a cloud over Maryland's move toward California-style, cleaner cars. A Maryland official, however, insists there is a silver lining.A federal judge in Binghamton, N.Y., has blocked New York's adoption of stringent emission standards for all new cars and trucks sold in that state beginning in 1995.Ruling on a lawsuit filed by the auto industry, U.S. District Judge Thomas J. McAvoy decided Friday that New York's adoption of California's tailpipe limits violates the federal Clean Air Act of 1990, which protects motor vehicle manufacturers from the "undue burden" of state regulations.
NEWS
September 4, 2012
Your editorial on the Environmental Protection Agency's new fuel efficiency standards was right on point ("EPA gets it right," Aug. 29). It lets us know where a Romney administration's priorities really would be on fuel standards. Hopefully, anyone who hasn't made up their minds about who to vote for in November will now know how to cast their ballot. James Maddox Jr., Baltimore
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2012
David Lones pulled his red and silver 18-wheeler off Interstate 95 South into the Maryland Welcome Center in Savage shortly after 5 p.m., some 12 hours after his day started in New Hampshire and in time to get a parking space for the night. He's not always so lucky. "You get here after dark, you can't find a parking space," said Lones, a friendly, big-armed 52-year-old from outside Chattanooga, Tenn. Those nights, he said, he has no choice but to drive back onto the highway, hoping to find some place to park before his federally mandated drive-time expires.
NEWS
August 29, 2012
With gas prices hovering around $4 a gallon this summer, everyone who drives can appreciate the beauty of vehicles designed to go twice as far on a tank of fuel than today's models - including the people who build cars. Some ideas simply make too much sense to stir much controversy. That's why even the U.S. auto industry has embraced the new fuel efficiency standards issued by the Environmental Protection Agency this week. The rules will require all new cars and trucks to average 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025, nearly double the fuel efficiency of the U.S. fleet in 2008.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
It takes a lot of cars and trucks to run a town like Baltimore, and the city government boasts a fleet consisting of more than 3,600 vehicles, many sporting the familiar black-and-yellow municipal seal. A spreadsheet containing the data is available here . In response to a public information request, the city gave The Baltimore Sun a spreadsheet with details about all of them (minus undercover or unmarked police cars to avoid interfering with criminal investigations).
NEWS
June 14, 2011
Extreme weather is on the rise ("Maryland braces for second heat wave," June 7). Maryland's heat wave is just one example, and scientists predict these extreme events will become increasingly common due to global warming. Heat waves are actually more lethal than other extreme events and pose greater danger to at-risk groups. In our recent report, "Global Warming and Extreme Weather," we found the number of heat waves has gone up since 1960, while 2010 is tied for the warmest year on record.
NEWS
May 13, 2011
A recent article ("Demand, not speculation, cited for rising oil prices," May 8) underscored the need to build cars and trucks that guzzle less gas. In the coming months, President Obama has an opportunity to break our oil dependence, save Marylanders money at the gas pump, and cut dangerous emissions by setting strong new fuel efficiency and global warming pollution standards for cars and trucks. Transportation accounts for more than half of the oil Americans use, so making more efficient cars and trucks is the easiest way to save Marylanders money on gas while reducing our oil dependence.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2004
Mercedes-Benz USA LLC, already the single-biggest car brand imported through the port of Baltimore, plans to sign a 10-year lease Monday for a large waterfront lot in Dundalk so it can increase the number of trucks and luxury automobiles brought here by ship. The German manufacturer now imports about 90,000 cars and trucks a year via smaller lots in Dundalk and Belcamp. The vehicles are then shipped by truck and rail to Midwest and East Coast dealerships. At a signing ceremony with Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. scheduled for Monday, port officials are expected to predict the larger, state-owned lot will increase Mercedes' annual import numbers to 160,000 over the life of the lease.
NEWS
By Ellen J. Silberman and Ellen J. Silberman,States News Service | January 9, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A decision this week by the Environmental Protection Ageency (EPA) clears the way for Maryland and other Northeastern states to combat the region's smog problems by requiring more stringent controls on auto and truck exhaust than the federal law requires, state air quality officials said yesterday.The EPA, after several months' delay, Thursday granted California a waiver from the 1990 Clean Air Act, allowing the state with the worst pollution problems in the country to impose the nation's toughest emission standards on new cars and trucks, starting with model year 1994.
NEWS
By Dan Becker and James Gerstenzang | July 14, 2009
Is the new "cash for clunkers" law really a vehicle for replacing gas-guzzling cars and trucks with the next generation of clean, green machines - or is it just a pretext for moving slightly less thirsty guzzlers from dealers' lots onto America's driveways? If the federal agency with the mission of overseeing the law does its job well, we'll find out quickly - and well before the automakers show up again on Capitol Hill, tin cup in hand, asking Congress this question from Dickens' Oliver Twist, updated for 2009: "Please, sirs, may we have some more billions?
NEWS
By Jim Tankersley and Richard Simon and Jim Tankersley and Richard Simon,Tribune Washington Bureau | May 19, 2009
WASHINGTON - -The Obama administration will unveil rules Tuesday that will require vast reductions in vehicle greenhouse gas emissions and gas mileage improvements over the next seven years, changes that will mark a potentially pivotal shift in the battle over global warming. After decades of political sparring, legal challenges and scientific arguments over climate change, three of the central players - the federal government, major U.S. car makers, and the state of California - have essentially concluded that the time has come to suspend hostilities and make a deal.
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