Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCars And Light
IN THE NEWS

Cars And Light

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 3, 1999
DETROIT -- General Motors Corp., Ford Motor Co. and DaimlerChrysler AG, the Big Three U.S. automakers, all had disappointing car and light-truck sales in October as 2000 models arrived on dealer lots and the supply of discounted 1999s dried up.GM's sales of North American-built cars and light trucks fell 3.5 percent, missing analysts' average forecast of a 1.5 percent increase. Ford's fell 6.4 percent and DaimlerChrysler's sales, excluding Mercedes-Benz, fell 3.8 percent, both bigger declines than analysts predicted.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 4, 2012
Your editorial on the Environmental Protection Agency's new fuel efficiency standards was right on point ("EPA gets it right," Aug. 29). It lets us know where a Romney administration's priorities really would be on fuel standards. Hopefully, anyone who hasn't made up their minds about who to vote for in November will now know how to cast their ballot. James Maddox Jr., Baltimore
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 4, 1999
DETROIT -- General Motors Corp., the world's largest automaker, said yesterday that its U.S. sales of cars and light trucks rose 18 percent in February, beating estimates and helping push industrywide sales up 13 percent to a record for the month.GM's results included gains of 20 percent for cars and 15 percent for light trucks.The report from the largest U.S. automaker came after reports of February increases of 8.8 percent for Ford Motor Co. and 7.7 percent for DaimlerChrysler AG, and 19 percent gains for Toyota Motor Corp.
BUSINESS
By Ken Bensinger and Ken Bensinger,Los Angeles Times | March 4, 2009
After more than a year of declining sales, February provided a glimpse of even worse times to come yesterday as General Motors Corp., Ford Motor Co., Toyota Motor Corp. and Chrysler reported declines of at least 40 percent in the U.S. market. Despite record incentives from carmakers, worsening economic conditions kept dealerships quiet and consumers in their older cars, making the past month the worst February since 1967, according to GM. GM said U.S. sales were down 53 percent for the month, with 127,296 cars and light trucks sold, while Ford's declined 48 percent, with 99,060 sales.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | January 18, 1994
Maryland's plan to adopt California's strict auto emissions standards is unlikely to curb smog in the Baltimore and Washington areas as much or as quickly as predicted, says a study released yesterday by a Johns Hopkins University pollution expert.Dr. Hugh Ellis, a professor of environmental engineering at Hopkins, concludes there may be cheaper and more reliable ways to reduce ozone pollution in the state than with so-called "California cars."Dr. Ellis' study puts a dent in a proposal by Maryland and some other states that low-emission vehicles, including some powered by batteries, be sold from Maine to Virginia beginning in 1997.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1999
New-car sales, a leading indicator of Maryland's economic health and consumer confidence, posted another strong gain in April, according to figures released yesterday by the state Motor Vehicle Administration.It was the sixth consecutive month in which sales were higher than in the corresponding period of the previous year. Sales have been up in 10 of the past 12 months.The gain here was more than three times that of the U.S. sales, where shipments of cars and light trucks jumped 3.8 percent over a strong April 1998.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | March 28, 2001
New-car sales dropped 13.5 percent in Maryland last month, but dealers aren't complaining. Despite the drop, sales were still considered fairly strong, said Peter Kitzmiller, president of the Maryland New Car and Truck Dealers Association, a trade group representing the majority of the state's 350 new-car dealerships. Kitzmiller noted that sales in February of last year were exceptionally strong, rising 35 percent, and that a decline from those numbers was considered virtually certain.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | July 6, 2002
Maryland consumers tightened their purse strings slightly in May, producing the first decline in new-car sales in the state in eight months, according to figures released yesterday by the Motor Vehicle Administration. "Maryland's economy is very sluggish at this time," said Anirban Basu, director of applied economics at Towson University's RESI Research & Consulting. "We're still seeing large-scale layoffs, but we are doing better than most other parts of the country." Basu attributed much of this to Maryland's being in the top one-third of the states in the nation in terms of job growth.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2002
Spurred on by record incentives, Maryland consumers bought more new cars during August than during any month since last October, according to figures released by the Motor Vehicle Administration. Dealers sold 38,965 new cars and light trucks during August, a gain of 4 percent over a strong August 2001. For dealers, it was their best August since 1991, when the MVA resumed releasing title registration figures, which equate with sales. Anirban Basu, director of applied economics at Towson University's RESI economic research institute, said that while new-car sales are still a leading economic indicator, they are being influenced by the auto manufacturer's zero-percent financing plans and lucrative rebates.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2000
Sales of new cars and light trucks in Maryland shot up 15.1 percent last month, well above the national level, according to figures released yesterday by the state Motor Vehicle Administration. It was the 20th consecutive month in which sales were higher than in the corresponding period of the previous year. "We are the benefactors of a good, strong economy," said Chuck Boyle, chairman of the Maryland New Car and Truck Dealers Association, which represents the majority of the state's 350 new-car dealerships.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,paul.west@baltsun.com | February 4, 2009
WASHINGTON - With U.S. auto sales falling near a 27-year low, the Senate gave its approval yesterday to a proposal by Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski to provide tax breaks to purchasers of new cars and light trucks. The Maryland Democrat's measure, which raises the price tag on the Senate's version of the economic stimulus package to almost $900 billion, would apply only to new vehicles purchased this calendar year. Mikulski said her plan "actually creates jobs" by stimulating employment in car making, sales and service.
NEWS
June 19, 2007
Maybe it's $3 per gallon gasoline. Or global warming. Or Democrats in charge of Congress. Or good advice from allies. Most likely, the decision by automakers to support a modest increase in fuel efficiency standards for the first time can be attributed to all of the above. It's a defensive strategy aimed at heading off a more ambitious proposal, which is the centerpiece of an energy bill that Senate leaders hope will win approval in that chamber by the end of the month. One of the tactic's targets is Maryland Democrat Barbara A. Mikulski, who has been sympathetic to industry warnings that tougher fuel standards would cost jobs.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2002
New-car sales in Maryland surged 28 percent in September, helping the state's automobile dealers post one of their best months ever, according to the most recent figures from the state's Motor Vehicle Administration. Motorists, enticed by low-interest financing deals and rebates, bought 39,740 new cars and light trucks in September, nearly 8,700 more than they bought during September last year. The last time more than 39,000 vehicles were sold in a month was in October last year, according to MVA figures.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2002
Spurred on by record incentives, Maryland consumers bought more new cars during August than during any month since last October, according to figures released by the Motor Vehicle Administration. Dealers sold 38,965 new cars and light trucks during August, a gain of 4 percent over a strong August 2001. For dealers, it was their best August since 1991, when the MVA resumed releasing title registration figures, which equate with sales. Anirban Basu, director of applied economics at Towson University's RESI economic research institute, said that while new-car sales are still a leading economic indicator, they are being influenced by the auto manufacturer's zero-percent financing plans and lucrative rebates.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | July 6, 2002
Maryland consumers tightened their purse strings slightly in May, producing the first decline in new-car sales in the state in eight months, according to figures released yesterday by the Motor Vehicle Administration. "Maryland's economy is very sluggish at this time," said Anirban Basu, director of applied economics at Towson University's RESI Research & Consulting. "We're still seeing large-scale layoffs, but we are doing better than most other parts of the country." Basu attributed much of this to Maryland's being in the top one-third of the states in the nation in terms of job growth.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | April 5, 2002
Maryland motorists continued their buying spree in February - both in the new-car showrooms and out on the used-car lots - at a pace that has astonished dealers, according to figures released yesterday by the state Motor Vehicle Administration. "I'm really surprised," said Peter Kitzmiller, president of the Maryland New Car and Truck Dealers Association, as he looked at the MVA numbers showing a 4.3 percent gain in new-car sales and an 18 percent jump in sales of previously owned cars.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 5, 2000
DETROIT -- DaimlerChrysler AG, Toyota Motor Corp. and Honda Motor Co. had record car and light truck sales in the United States in 1999, boosting the industry to its best year as discounts and higher consumer incomes stoked demand. DaimlerChrysler, the third-largest automaker in the United States, said yesterday that its Chrysler division's sales climbed 5.1 percent, capped by a 0.7 percent gain in December. Toyota's 1999 sales gained 8.4 percent, while Honda's increased 6.7 percent. Industrywide sales in the United States of about 17 million last year broke the 1986 record of 16.03 million, powered by the lowest unemployment in 29 years and rising personal wealth fed by climbing U.S. stocks.
BUSINESS
By New York Times | June 5, 1991
DETROIT -- Sales of domestically built cars and light trucks dropped 10 percent in May from a year earlier, but on a seasonally adjusted basis car sales alone were slightly stronger than in the previous month, leading to some hope that the automotive recession may have bottomed out.Car sales, a barometer of economic health, are being closely watched for signs that a recovery may be under way. But statistics from a single 10-day period or just one month are...
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2002
New-car sales in Maryland jumped 17.3 percent in November over November 2000, according to figures released yesterday by the Motor Vehicle Administration. Lured by low-interest financing - zero percent on many models - motorists bought nearly 5,000 more cars and light trucks during the 20 selling days of November than during the corresponding part of 2000, which had 19 selling days. The November 2001 sales were the highest for any November since the MVA resumed releasing registration figures in 1991.
NEWS
By Charli Coon | July 24, 2001
LAWMAKERS in Washington, the city that gave us low-flow toilets, a mandatory drinking age and a national speed limit for our highways, want to mandate even higher fuel-economy standards for cars and light trucks. Now, such a proposal may sound good. After all, anything that can save a few bucks at the gas pump should be encouraged, right? And if it helps us pollute less and cut our dependence on foreign oil, even better. What's not to like? Plenty. Take a look under the hood, and you'll see why the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.