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NEWS
May 5, 2014
It should be no surprise that the 26th Street landslide happened ( "Displaced residents blame city, railroad for inaction," May 2). Landslides occur after heavy rain and deterioration of the land. With over 3 inches of rain and a road that has had very little done to fix safety issues, this should come as no surprise. It was the perfect mix for an urban landslide like this one to occur. The fact that nobody was hurt was a good thing. However, something very alarming came from this.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
A Japanese shipping line will pay a nearly $70 million fine after agreeing to plead guilty to fixing prices and rigging bids for services at the port of Baltimore, the Justice Department said Friday. Kawasaki Kisen Kaisha Ltd., or K-Line, is the latest ocean carrier charged in a massive antitrust investigation of companies that federal officials say have conspired to drive up international shipping prices. K-Line, which was charged in U.S. District Court in Baltimore on Friday, provides shipping services for roll-on, roll-off cargo — including cars, trucks and construction equipment — to and from the U.S. and elsewhere.
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NEWS
June 2, 2012
While MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blakeis selling ads on Baltimore's firetrucks to raise money to keep the stations open ("Bill to put ads on city fire trucks advances, May 30), she should try selling ads on the fleet of vehicles that chauffeur her around. Dan Griffin, Perry Hall
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
A rusted old Chevy Impala fell victim. As did a new red Cadillac. And a block over, Thomas Saunders' gold Grand Caravan also was hit. On Monday morning, residents in one corner of West Baltimore woke up to find that someone had shot out their car windows. In the chilly air, a group of police officers looked over the damage and took reports. Neighbors, on their porches and in the street, looked on. "This used to be a really nice street," Saunders, 57, said. In all, police counted at least eight damaged cars in the 2200 blocks of N. Dukeland St. and N. Koko Lane.
NEWS
October 17, 2011
I read in The Sun that city agencies are preparing for another round of budget cuts to be submitted in next year's budget ("City agencies preparing for another round of cuts," Oct. 14). Have they ever thought of taking away the vehicles that city employees use every day on the job? Every city, state, and federal government agency gives its employees automobiles to drive to work (and I am sure for their personal use, as well). Private industry does not give vehicles to their employees.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2010
Baltimore City police are investigating several acts of vandalism in Northwest Baltimore last weekend in which swastikas and other messages were spray-painted onto cars, said a police spokesman. Cars were tagged on Strathmore Avenue, Clarinth Road and Labyrinth Road between late Friday night and early Saturday morning, said Kevin Brown, the spokesman. In the 2800 block of W. Strathmore Ave., a swastika was spray-painted on a vehicle, along with the phrase "IH8U," while an expletive was found on the side of another vehicle in the same block.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2012
Anne Arundel County police are investigating several armed robberies that occurred over the weekend in Brooklyn Park, Galesville, Glen Burnie and Annapolis. In several cases, they have descriptions of the suspects, but have been unable to locate them. Officers on patrol in Gambrills did arrest a 29-year-old Arnold man in connection with a series of thefts from autos. Officers stopped a vehicle, known to be involved in the thefts, at about 3 a.m. Friday on Reidel Road, near Route 3. The driver Brandon Michael Smith of the 1100 block Wright Avenue gave officers the consent to search the vehicle.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2012
Parked in Anne Arundel County and Annapolis are cars with tempting stuff in plain sight: a GPS unit on the dashboard, a cellphone on the console, a handbag with a wallet visible in it on the floor behind the driver's seat. But it isn't just would-be thieves looking to see what's in the car and tugging on its door handles. Police are doing it too, in programs aimed at stopping thefts from parked vehicles. Police from both jurisdictions recently walked through parking lots and neighborhoods, finding numerous cars in which items that would catch a thief's eye were in plain sight: keys, cash, bicycles, financial paperwork, even a washer-dryer unit for an RV. In the recent walk-throughs, only about one in every 10 cars was unlocked, though police say in some neighborhoods that number is likely nine of 10. "My purse is in there," Kim Harris said when Anne Arundel County police Cpl. Brian Carney asked her whether she had left anything of value in view after she locked her car in the lot at Big Vanilla Athletic Club in Pasadena on a recent evening.
BUSINESS
January 12, 2010
Electric, hybrid and small cars will grab center stage at the Detroit auto show this week, as the industry adapts to a world reshaped by recession and environmental worries. Ford wants to build on success in midsize sedans and reignite small-car sales, while Hyundai aims to extend last year's triumph in budget-conscious models. GM and Chrysler will start fresh with electric vehicles but also try to boost their small-car credibility. Toyota hopes to solidify its dominance in hybrids. The new models must be successful if automakers are to reverse last year's 21 percent sales plunge.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2010
A busy street in downtown Baltimore might be the last place one would expect to see a bocce game going on. But just before noon Friday, with traffic rumbling by, Nicole Reedy and Jeff Stump squared off for a friendly match on a swath of grass laid down where cars would normally be parked in front of their office on West Franklin Street. A few feet away, co-workers and clients chatted while sipping wine and soft drinks under a green-roofed lean-to. It was another PARK(ing)
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
This week, the Washington Post is running a series on how police work to seize cash during car stops without a warrant or making an arrest -- and data compiled by the paper suggests Baltimore City and Baltimore County police are among the biggest financial beneficiaries of the controversial tactic. Under a federal program, police departments can get payouts when they seize cash. And since 2001 the two Maryland departments each received $7 million taken from motorists and others, according to the Post's analysis.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2014
A 34-year-old Monkton man was killed in a crash in Glyndon Saturday night, police said. Police identified the man as David Wesley Blizzard, Jr. of the 500 block of Monkton Road. Blizzard was driving eastbound in the 4200 block of Worthington Ave., when his 1992 Honda Accord crossed the opposite side of the street, left the roadway and hit a tree, police said. Emergency responders were called at around 7:45 p.m., and Blizzard, the car's only occupant, was pronounced dead at the scene, police said.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
Anne Arundel County police say a 23-year-old man was killed in a car crash Thursday morning in Glen Burnie. The crash happened near the intersection of Baltimore Annapolis Boulevard and East Furnace Branch Road. Police said that at about 3:40 a.m., a 2008 Ford Fusion was traveling south on East Furnace Branch when the driver failed to negotiate the curve. The vehicle struck the curb and guardrail before overturning onto the guardrail. Police said the driver, identified as Edward Jefferson Hanvey II, 18, left the scene was found a short time later walking north along Baltimore Annapolis Boulevard.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
R.I.P. Handy. It's given name was The Epicentral Shrine to the Helping Hand Vehicular, but one look at Conrad Bladey's beloved art car made it immediately clear why everyone knew it as Handy. A 1990 Pontiac Grand Am, Handy was covered front-to-back, but especially on top, with dozens of mostly bright-red fiberglass hands. No one who saw it on the streets of Baltimore, or hitting the road in its northern Anne Arundel County home of Linthicum, will ever forget the sight. Handy always made quite an impression.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2014
A car rammed into a Howard County doughnut shop Monday evening, seriously injuring two people. A photo posted by the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue Services showed a dark-colored sport utility vehicle inside the Dunkin Donuts at 8455 Baltimore National Pike in Ellicott City. According to the department, the car struck two men, ages 36 and 44, shortly after 5:30 p.m. as they were standing outside the doughnut shop, and pushed them into the storefront. They were taken by ambulance to the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where they were listed in serious but stable condition.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Howard County police say their speed camera vendor has corrected a year's worth of inaccurate data the company submitted about the cameras there.  In a letter submitted to the County Council this week, Chief Gary Gardner reported that Xerox State & Local Solutions had resolved its data issues to the police department's satisfaction. "Xerox has resubmitted the report to the police department after manually checking the data points and it now includes all of the original, complete information," Gardner wrote.
NEWS
February 12, 2010
I would like to comment on Michael Dresser's article about "bad truck drivers" ("Can't avoid jackknifing? Don't be a truck driver," Feb. 8). Nowhere in that article did he mention the bad car drivers out there that cause 75 percent of the truck wrecks across the country. Mr. Dresser seems to have a grudge against truck drivers in general. Question to him: When was the last time you actually drove 40 tons down the road and tried to stop it on a dime because of a four-wheeler stopping in front of you on short notice?
NEWS
By Chris Merriam and Robbyn Lewis | June 4, 2013
Baltimore City is at a transportation crossroads. We can move in the direction of a safer, healthier, more sustainable and economical city - the direction in which dozens of cities across America are moving - or fall back on prioritizing cars over people. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake recently selected William Johnson as the new director of the Baltimore City Department of Transportation. The priorities that the mayor and Mr. Johnson set for Baltimore's transportation future will have a significant impact on neighborhood livability and our ability to retain current residents and attract new ones.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
A Mount Airy man was killed in a car crash in Ellicott City Wednesday night after suffering a medical emergency that caused him to lose control of the vehicle, Howard County police said. Police identified the driver as Scott Brian Stanley, 41. Stanley was the only person in the Mazda Rx-8 while he was driving on Baltimore National Pike near Turf Valley Road. Around 9:15 p.m., he suffered a serious medical emergency and the car ran off the road and struck a tree, catching on fire.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2014
A Dundalk man died after he was struck by a car when he attempted to cross Belair Road Tuesday night, Baltimore County police said. Gary Leahey, 53, of the 7900 block of St. Gregory Drive, was crossing Belair, north of Elm Avenue in Overlea, when he was hit by a 2004 Hyundai Sonata headed north on Belair Road, police said. The incident occurred just before 9 p.m. The Hyundai remained at the scene, police said. Leahey was taken to Franklin Square Hospital where he later died.
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