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By The Dallas Morning News | April 21, 1993
In its original form this recipe calls for peeling and shredding the carrots. Make it fast by using grated carrots from the produce department. The recipe is from "Cuisine Economique" by Jacques Pepin (William Morrow and Co.).Carrot and sunflower seed saladMakes 6 servings10 to 12 ounces grated carrots (about 6 medium carrots)4 cloves garlic, crushed and chopped1 teaspoon black pepper1/2 teaspoon salt2 tablespoons cider vinegar5 tablespoons corn oil1/2 cup sunflower seeds2 scallions, finely minced, plus extra for garnish6 lettuce leaves for garnishIf using whole carrots, trim at both ends; peel.
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By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Maryland officials approved $16 billion in contracts Wednesday that are intended to change the way state employees use health care by offering rewards for taking steps to stay well - and imposing penalties for refusing to comply. Rewards would come in the form of free doctor visits and procedures, while penalties for failing to follow medical advice could go as high as $375. Most coverage changes start in January. The contract award, believed to be the largest in Maryland history, is projected to save the state and its employees $4 billion over the next decade.
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By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | August 5, 2001
Can carrots burn down your house? This urgent question comes up thanks to reader Doug Forand, who writes to describe an alarming discovery he made recently while experimenting with carrots in his microwave oven. (You may be wondering why he was experimenting with carrots in his microwave oven. He had a solid scientific reason: His wife was not home.) Doug claims that if you break a carrot into two pieces, then place the pieces on a plate so they're just touching, then cook them in the microwave, "intense flames will start to shoot out of the carrot at the contact point."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
The 6 o'clock news is gloomy enough as it is. Imagine if, every day at twilight, it also involved the threat from a sniper who liked to pick off random victims as they gathered in front of their TV sets to watch the broadcast. The resulting unease and disorientation from such a scenario, the sense that the center will definitely not hold, gives a neat edge to "The Apocalypse Comes at 6PM," a satiric/surrealistic work from 2010 by Bulgarian writer Georgi Gospodinov. The play, now onstage at Single Carrot Theatre in an English translation by Angela Rodel, packs in a lot of biting commentary on contemporary society, relationships, alienation ("I had some friends during the 1980s; then they bought a VCR")
NEWS
By Joe Gray and Kate Shatzkin | November 15, 2006
How we take carrots for granted. We munch them unthinkingly all year long, counting on them to be ever-present at the markets as other vegetables come and go. When fall comes around, they're eclipsed by other root vegetables like sweet potatoes and parsnips, more distinctive harbingers of the season. But the common carrot still holds a few surprises. Though we think of it as bright orange, this member of the parsley family is sometimes sunny yellow or dark red or even purple. What we didn't know is that all these colors -- even orange -- have been bred in, according to Barbara Kafka in her book Vegetable Love.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | April 26, 1995
A couple of toughs surprised me the other day in the garden.BThey were carrots left over from last year's gardening efforts. My kid, then 9 years old, had sprinkled some seeds in a corner of the garden. The seeds had not done much last summer, and they were virtually forgotten until a few days ago when I was poking around in the dusts of April.When I first stood over the swaying green tops of the carrots, I thought they were a variation of my biggest crop, weeds. Then I thought they might have been survivors of our long-lost dill crop.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | November 8, 2006
Treat yourself and family with this colorful fall dinner. Salmon fillets are baked and topped with a black-olive-and-shallot sauce. It's served with black beans and orange carrots. The tastes and textures are a treat. Diane Goodman, Miami caterer and author of The Plated Heart, suggested this festive meal in a recent interview. It's full of flavor and fun and only takes a few minutes to make. The trick to cooking this salmon is to make sure the oven is at the right temperature before putting in the fish.
NEWS
By Wayne S. Smith | July 9, 1992
EVEN in the case of Cuba the Cold War should be over.The island is no longer a problem to us or others.Cuban troops are out of Africa. Cuban support for revolutionary groups in Latin America is finished. Cuban-Russian military ties are no longer a matter of concern.None of this, however, has resulted in any change in U.S. policy.The administration has moved the goal posts and now says only after Cuba has a market economy and has held fully democratic elections can there be any change in our approach.
FEATURES
By Charles Britton and Charles Britton,Copley News Service | January 15, 1992
So here it is, the latest sensation among ingredients, the veggie that has food mavens clustering around exhibition kitchens in trendy restaurants and rummaging through the produce in upscale supermarkets.It's the carrot.It's inexpensive, it's nutritious, it's available all year 'round and, most important from a culinary perspective, it gets into more dishes than any other vegetable except for the onion, with which it is often partnered.Chopped carrots and onions, often with the addition of celery, make up mirepoix, the sauteed mixture of aromatic vegetables that form the start of countless dishes in classic cuisine.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 27, 1990
OZYORI, U.S.S.R. -- Yevgeny G. Krastelev can ordinarily be found experimenting with high-current electron beams at Moscow's prestigious Lebedev Physics Institute, where he holds a senior research post.But yesterday Dr. Krastelev was busy tugging carrots from a muddy field on the Yemelyanovka State Farm, 100 miles south of the capital.Around him, shaking dirt from carrots and tossing them into wicker baskets, were five colleagues from the world-famous center of Soviet physics research, scientific home of the late Andrei D. Sakharov.
ENTERTAINMENT
Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
Vaclav Havel, the late poet, playwright and president (Czechoslovakia's last, the Czech Republic's first), aimed his satirical eye at bureaucracy and corporate-speak in a play called "The Memorandum. " It premiered 49 years ago, way before computers, cellphones, OMG and LOL, but it has hardly lost its relevance. When a character in the play notes that we are "inevitably fragmenting" and becoming "more and more deeply alienated," the description still fits - if anything, more tightly.
FEATURES
By Abigail Green, For The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
Recent studies have shown that many commercial baby foods are lacking in nutrition and full of things your baby doesn't need, like sugar and preservatives. But is homemade worth the hassle? We weighed the pros and cons. Pro: It's easy. Pureeing carrots is a far cry from making coq au vin . Steaming, mashing, stirring - that's as complicated as baby food needs to be. Con: It's time consuming. Yes, it does take longer to make your own food than to buy it. But take a tip from Baltimore dad Chi Yan, who would make a big batch of pureed fruits or veggies, then freeze single servings in ice cube trays for quick meals for his son, Henry.
NEWS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2014
The good vibrations inside Single Carrot Theatre 's new home in Remington are infectious — all the more apt considering that the inaugural production is called "The Flu Season. " Stepping into the venue, which once housed a tire repair shop, is a lift in itself. The place is such a far cry from the tiny spot at Load of Fun on North Avenue, where the company had its longest residency. There's even an honest-to-goodness lobby; the one at Load of Fun seemed to be about 3 square feet.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
The good vibrations inside Single Carrot Theatre's new home in Remington are infectious - all the more apt considering that the inaugural production is called "The Flu Season. " Stepping into the venue, which once housed a tire repair shop, is a lift in itself. The place is such a far cry from the tiny spot at Load of Fun on North Avenue, where the company had its longest residency. There's even an honest-to-goodness lobby; the one at Load of Fun seemed to be about three square feet.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2014
Single Carrot Theatre , the zesty venture by a bunch of buddies from the University of Colorado who decided to cultivate a company in Baltimore, now has something it has long desired - a permanent roof over its head. This week's inauguration of a spiffy venue at the corner of North Howard and 26th streets in the metamorphosing Remington neighborhood marks a milestone and fresh opportunity for the troupe, devoted to cutting-edge repertoire. "It feels like the first six years were one chapter and this is a new chapter," says Genevieve de Mahy, a founding member of Single Carrot.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2013
On any given night, when folks are sitting around wondering what they're going to do for dinner in Baltimore, the suggestion of Thai Arroy will stop the dithering. "Sure," everyone says, "let's go there. " Since its 2002 opening in Federal Hill , Thai Arroy has held remarkably steady. The menu is an ordinary one, as American Thai restaurants go. That's not a knock. The food is well-prepared, fresh and attractively presented. The sauces without exception have deep, rich flavors that suggest long simmering, or at least the know-how to make them taste that way. But the specialty at Thai Arroy is consistency, which is how a restaurant gets itself into a city's heart and winds up on personal lists of go-to places.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | January 5, 2003
Whenever I plan the menu for a winter dinner party, I always feel challenged to find interesting vegetables to serve with the main course. In the cold-weather months, side-dish possibilities are limited. Choices include root vegetables, fennel, Brussels sprouts and potatoes, which I typically roast or saute and sprinkle with herbs. However, a good friend recently mentioned that she had created a delicious carrot and leek gratin which, when served, had received rave reviews from guests. This baked vegetable dish has several unusual features.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | September 10, 2008
Afew months ago, while my husband and I were in Paris working for several weeks, I noticed an unusual soup listed on the chalkboard outside a cafe in our neighborhood. I wasn't planning to eat lunch there but was so intrigued by the sound of a carrot-and-coconut soup that I stopped in. The waitress asked if I wanted the potage cold or warm, and I opted for the latter. Several minutes later, she returned with a bowl of piping-hot soup that was thick, creamy and a lovely orange hue. One sip and I knew I wanted the recipe.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2013
Single Carrot Theatre, one of Baltimore's most successful out-of-the-mainstream companies, has named Kellie Mecleary as interim artistic director, effective Aug. 1 and continuing through July 2014. She succeeds longtime Carrot member Nathan Cooper, who is heading off to start a theater career in Bulgaria. Mecleary has spent the past two years with Center Stage as senior artistic fellow. She has an M.A. in Performance Studies from New York University, a B.A. in English and Theater from Goucher College.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette,
The Baltimore Sun
| July 15, 2013
In my continuing attempt to eat only what is already in my fridge and pantry all week, this recipe, which I found in WomenHeart's All Heart Family Cookbook (Rodale, 2008), appealed to me because I knew I could adapt it easily. The original recipe was called "Happy Heart Pasta Primavera" and included shrimp, tomatoes and broccoli. Since I didn't have those items, I decided to increase the amounts of some of the other ingredients, like onions and carrots.  I imagine the original recipe is really delicious, because this scaled-back version was pretty good, too, for a simple Sunday night supper.
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