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By SUSAN REIMER | June 2, 2009
Carroll Gardens a quaint and slightly ragged cinder-block garden center at the end of a dirt road in Westminster, is closing at the end of this month after having been a resource for gardeners since the 1930s. Alan Summers, who has owned Carroll Gardens since 1984 and hosted a garden talk show on WCBM-AM for nearly as long, announced his decision Saturday on the show, stunning customers and disappointing longtime employees who had hoped against hope for a reprieve. Though Carroll Gardens is having a very good season, last summer was the worst in memory and the debt has finally overwhelmed Summers, he said.
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NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | June 2, 2009
Carroll Gardens a quaint and slightly ragged cinder-block garden center at the end of a dirt road in Westminster, is closing at the end of this month after having been a resource for gardeners since the 1930s. Alan Summers, who has owned Carroll Gardens since 1984 and hosted a garden talk show on WCBM-AM for nearly as long, announced his decision Saturday on the show, stunning customers and disappointing longtime employees who had hoped against hope for a reprieve. Though Carroll Gardens is having a very good season, last summer was the worst in memory and the debt has finally overwhelmed Summers, he said.
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NEWS
February 8, 2004
The Carroll County Master Gardeners invite the public to attend the guest speaker portion of their monthly general meetings. The one-hour lectures are held at 7:30 p.m. at Carroll Cooperative Extension, Smith Avenue in Westminster. The following lectures are planned: Four-Season Gardening on Feb. 18. Alan Summers of Carroll Gardens will give recommendations for year-round landscaping. Summers has been an avid gardener for 50 years and has learned to choose plants carefully. Houseplant Care: The Dos and Don'ts on March 10. Carrie Engel of Valley View Nursery will share information on how to best care for indoor plants.
NEWS
February 8, 2004
The Carroll County Master Gardeners invite the public to attend the guest speaker portion of their monthly general meetings. The one-hour lectures are held at 7:30 p.m. at Carroll Cooperative Extension, Smith Avenue in Westminster. The following lectures are planned: Four-Season Gardening on Feb. 18. Alan Summers of Carroll Gardens will give recommendations for year-round landscaping. Summers has been an avid gardener for 50 years and has learned to choose plants carefully. Houseplant Care: The Dos and Don'ts on March 10. Carrie Engel of Valley View Nursery will share information on how to best care for indoor plants.
NEWS
October 22, 1996
A man wearing a "Casper the Friendly Ghost" mask robbed a Westminster convenience store at gunpoint at 6 p.m. Sunday before fleeing with an undisclosed amount of money, police said yesterday.The gunman was described as slender and about 5 feet 5 inches tall. He wore a brown, knee-length coat and had short dark hair, graying at the temples, and spoke with a Spanish accent, police said.The High's store is in the 200 block of E. Green St.FireWestminster: Firefighters from Reese assisted Westminster at 7: 46 p.m. Friday, responding to an alarm in the 400 block of Oak Hill Court.
NEWS
By Ann Egerton and Ann Egerton,Special to the Sun | March 19, 2000
The common names for the usually small, early spring, ephemeral plants conjure up a world of magic and play. Names like false mermaid (Floerkea proserpinacoides), harbinger-of-spring (Erigenia bulbosa) and spring beauty (Claytonia virginica) suggest a storybook world. They are playful in their habits too, for many are mysterious and elusive to find, identify and cultivate. Ephemeral is the term for many flowers that come up in the early spring, bloom and, along with their foliage, quickly disappear.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | May 23, 1999
Beatrix Potter introduced me to foxgloves. Until I saw them in her children's story "The Tale of Jemima Puddleduck," I hadn't known such marvels existed. They looked like purply-pink cathedral spires spangled with bells, a whole thicket of them surrounding the cottage of the "whiskered, bushy-tailed gentleman" of the story -- the fox who was after Jemima's eggs."They're an old garden plant and conjure up the old cottage-garden atmosphere," says Englishman John Elsley, horticulturist at Wayside Gardens in South Carolina.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman | March 16, 1997
Every yard has its quirks, those little peaks and valleys in the landscape that define the terrain and give the place its charm. A gentle slope here, a soft depression there, an interesting rock -- all can provide the lot with a personality all its own.Homeowners appreciate such features. Unless the front yard plummets like a slalom run. Or the back yard puddles up like the Chesapeake Bay. Or that "rock" is the size of Gibraltar.Landscaping nightmares? Not necessarily. Many obstacles in the yard can be overcome, and some can be even be turned to advantage.
FEATURES
By Mike Klingaman | February 25, 1996
Susan Dowell's garden is a time machine filled with the sights and scents of bygone eras. Old-fashioned peonies, lilacs and lilies of the valley surround her Monkton home. One whiff of those fragrant antiques sends her spinning back through time, says Mrs. Dowell, who used to caress the blossoms of those flowers as a child in her grandmother's garden.Tim Fortney gets a rush every time he digs in the cool, dark loam around his "new" home, a 17th-century manor house near Crownsville. Each spade of soil unearths more buried treasure -- rare varieties of phlox, crape myrtle and sturdy old asters that have survived years of neglect.
FEATURES
By Dorothy Fleetwood and Dorothy Fleetwood,Contributing Writer | May 2, 1993
After nine years of historical and architectural research and more than two years of interior restoration, the Charles Carroll House in Annapolis will open to the public Saturday. The house, at 107 Duke of Gloucester St., is the birthplace of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, the only Catholic signer of the Declaration of Independence. It is the sole surviving birthplace of a Maryland signer.As part of the opening ceremonies from noon to 4 p.m., the 6th Maryland Regiment will offer musket salutes while an actor playing Charles Carroll disembarks from the tall ship Providence.
NEWS
By Ann Egerton and Ann Egerton,Special to the Sun | March 19, 2000
The common names for the usually small, early spring, ephemeral plants conjure up a world of magic and play. Names like false mermaid (Floerkea proserpinacoides), harbinger-of-spring (Erigenia bulbosa) and spring beauty (Claytonia virginica) suggest a storybook world. They are playful in their habits too, for many are mysterious and elusive to find, identify and cultivate. Ephemeral is the term for many flowers that come up in the early spring, bloom and, along with their foliage, quickly disappear.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | May 23, 1999
Beatrix Potter introduced me to foxgloves. Until I saw them in her children's story "The Tale of Jemima Puddleduck," I hadn't known such marvels existed. They looked like purply-pink cathedral spires spangled with bells, a whole thicket of them surrounding the cottage of the "whiskered, bushy-tailed gentleman" of the story -- the fox who was after Jemima's eggs."They're an old garden plant and conjure up the old cottage-garden atmosphere," says Englishman John Elsley, horticulturist at Wayside Gardens in South Carolina.
NEWS
By Lisa Breslin and Lisa Breslin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 8, 1998
MEMBERS OF THE Carroll Garden Club recently brought home honors from the State Flower Show at Anne Arundel Community College.The show is held every five years at locations throughout Maryland, and this one proved to be unique, thanks to El Nino.The show featured more roses than any other flower, no tulips and "one woman managed to have two daffodils," said Mary Ellen Bay, garden club member and winner of a blue and a yellow ribbon in this year's competition.The Carroll Garden Club was honored for having the highest percentage of club members participating, an award few members anticipated.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman | March 16, 1997
Every yard has its quirks, those little peaks and valleys in the landscape that define the terrain and give the place its charm. A gentle slope here, a soft depression there, an interesting rock -- all can provide the lot with a personality all its own.Homeowners appreciate such features. Unless the front yard plummets like a slalom run. Or the back yard puddles up like the Chesapeake Bay. Or that "rock" is the size of Gibraltar.Landscaping nightmares? Not necessarily. Many obstacles in the yard can be overcome, and some can be even be turned to advantage.
NEWS
October 22, 1996
A man wearing a "Casper the Friendly Ghost" mask robbed a Westminster convenience store at gunpoint at 6 p.m. Sunday before fleeing with an undisclosed amount of money, police said yesterday.The gunman was described as slender and about 5 feet 5 inches tall. He wore a brown, knee-length coat and had short dark hair, graying at the temples, and spoke with a Spanish accent, police said.The High's store is in the 200 block of E. Green St.FireWestminster: Firefighters from Reese assisted Westminster at 7: 46 p.m. Friday, responding to an alarm in the 400 block of Oak Hill Court.
FEATURES
By Mike Klingaman | February 25, 1996
Susan Dowell's garden is a time machine filled with the sights and scents of bygone eras. Old-fashioned peonies, lilacs and lilies of the valley surround her Monkton home. One whiff of those fragrant antiques sends her spinning back through time, says Mrs. Dowell, who used to caress the blossoms of those flowers as a child in her grandmother's garden.Tim Fortney gets a rush every time he digs in the cool, dark loam around his "new" home, a 17th-century manor house near Crownsville. Each spade of soil unearths more buried treasure -- rare varieties of phlox, crape myrtle and sturdy old asters that have survived years of neglect.
NEWS
By Lisa Breslin and Lisa Breslin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 8, 1998
MEMBERS OF THE Carroll Garden Club recently brought home honors from the State Flower Show at Anne Arundel Community College.The show is held every five years at locations throughout Maryland, and this one proved to be unique, thanks to El Nino.The show featured more roses than any other flower, no tulips and "one woman managed to have two daffodils," said Mary Ellen Bay, garden club member and winner of a blue and a yellow ribbon in this year's competition.The Carroll Garden Club was honored for having the highest percentage of club members participating, an award few members anticipated.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff writer | October 13, 1991
Planning a flower show often spans an entire growing season.While the potential exhibits are growing in their garden beds, organizersdecide on a theme and establish the ground rules.Exhibitors don't just snip a few flowers from their back yards, stick them in a vase, add water and carry them to the exhibit hall.The Carroll Garden Club spent nearly a year choosing "Works of the Masters" as the theme for its evaluated standard flower show, which ran for two days last month at the Westminster Riding Club.
FEATURES
By Dorothy Fleetwood and Dorothy Fleetwood,Contributing Writer | May 2, 1993
After nine years of historical and architectural research and more than two years of interior restoration, the Charles Carroll House in Annapolis will open to the public Saturday. The house, at 107 Duke of Gloucester St., is the birthplace of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, the only Catholic signer of the Declaration of Independence. It is the sole surviving birthplace of a Maryland signer.As part of the opening ceremonies from noon to 4 p.m., the 6th Maryland Regiment will offer musket salutes while an actor playing Charles Carroll disembarks from the tall ship Providence.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff writer | March 29, 1992
About 200 members and guests of the Carroll Garden Club recently learned how to add expert floral notes to their entertaining.The audience spent a Wednesday afternoon in early March watching Michael Paul Hare, an internationally recognized floral designer, as he deftly changed bunches of flowers and greenery into to eye-pleasing colorful displays.Hare, who owns the Waldorf Florist in Charles County, won the Telefloral International Designer of the Year Award in 1990.Guests clapped, oohed and aahed, as Hare produced one arrangement after another from flowers that many people here have readily available.
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