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By Larry Carson | September 27, 2009
The first public explanation of the new plan for building as many as 325 single-family homes in the northeast corner of historic Doughoregan Manor is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. Oct. 21 at the Ellicott City Senior Center, next to the Miller Library on Frederick Road. The session, called a "pre-submission meeting" in planning jargon, will let the public to hear an explanation of the proposal from the Carroll family's representatives before any plans are submitted to the county. Joseph Rutter, a former county planning director hired by the family, said they hope to stick to the division of land under a previous plan to build an Erickson retirement community on the site.
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NEWS
Staff Reports | December 1, 2013
The weekend after Thanksgiving not only signals the official start of the Christmas season, but also the start of the Christmas tree hunting season.  For many families, holiday traditions include a visit to a cut-your-own tree farm the weekend of Thanksgiving -- or soon afterward. In Carroll County, there are many options for farms where families can search for the perfect tree, cut it themselves and haul it home. In addition to fresh-cut trees, some farms offer baling, wreaths and greens.  The 2013 version of Christmas Trees and Holiday Greens in Carroll County is available online HERE.
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NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2001
As about 100 people watched, prime Ellicott City land owned by descendants of a Declaration of Independence signer was auctioned off on the steps of the Howard County Circuit Courthouse yesterday - and was promptly bought for $12.5 million by four of the family members, who plan to build houses there. The 270-acre parcel sits to the south of the Carroll family's Doughoregan Manor, the stately home where Founding Father Charles Carroll once lived. Two branches of the family jointly owned the tract and were on the verge of battling over the fate of the land in court this year when both agreed to the auction.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2010
Critics of a plan to build 325 homes on one part of historic Doughoregan Manor and preserve the rest of the Ellicott City estate attacked the complex proposal as a "manufactured artifice," as they tried this week to defeat a necessary zoning change. Opponents used the very intricacy of the multipart plan and the fact that Howard County's zoning board members also serve as County Council members as the basis for their argument. Several opponents also suggested that there might have been collusion between the estate's owners and county lawyers.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,sun reporter | September 4, 2006
Members of two separate branches of Maryland's historic Carroll family have submitted plans to Howard County to sell the building rights they hold on several chunks of historic Doughoregan Manor to builders in other parts of the county, preserving the land for agriculture. If approved by Howard County officials, the proposed sales would give developers the right to build on 237 acres of land elsewhere in the county, keep two large Doughoregan Manor tracts undeveloped, and bring in over $9 million for the Carroll descendents, based on the county's top price for prime preservation land.
NEWS
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | August 4, 1996
A portrait of Prudence Carnan Gough by John Wesley Jarvis (1780-1840) and three cabinet-sized portraits of members of the James Macubbin Carroll Jr. family by William James Hubard (1807-1862) have been given to the Mount Clare Museum House in Carroll Park in Southwest Baltimore by the National Society of the Colonial Dames of America. The portraits will be added to the collection of 12 portraits of family members already on display at the mansion.Mount Clare was the home of Charles Carroll, Barrister (1723-83)
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | December 9, 2007
The kitchen at Mount Clare, the Colonial mansion of Charles Carroll the Barrister in Southwest Baltimore, was, on the one hand, a modern foodie's dream - airy, spacious and chock-full of locally grown, organic, hormone-free meat, fish, eggs and vegetables. But there were some down sides. Those vegetables, this time of year, would be limited to carrots, onions and other roots waiting to be exhumed from the dirt floor of the cellar. And the meat, larded for as long as three years in casks of salt, would look about as succulent as a piece of petrified wood.
NEWS
By ANDREW D. FAITH and ANDREW D. FAITH,SUN REPORTER | March 19, 2006
Doughoregan Manor has been the home of the Carroll family since Colonial times. The first Charles Carroll, known as the Settler or Immigrant, was the progenitor of the Carroll family in Maryland. He arrived in the colony on Oct. 1, 1688, having been named attorney general under Charles Calvert, the third Lord Baltimore. Carroll, a Catholic, had been dispossessed of his estate at Ballymacadam Castle, the main seat of the O'Carrolls in the Irish midlands, through English persecution, according to Ronald Hoffman in his book, Princes of Ireland, Planters of Maryland.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | October 7, 1990
From The Sun Oct. 7-13, 1840Oct. 10: We call the attention of those of our readers who have had the misfortune to lose a limb, to take the advertisement in today's Sun, of Charles Bartlett, the celebrated manufacturer of cork legs, &c.From The Sun Oct. 7-13, 1890Oct. 13: Wild turkeys are more numerous in Garrett County than they have been for many years.From The Sun Oct. 7-13, 1940Oct. 11: David Cross, former Negro slave and for decades a coachman for the Carroll family of Doughoregan Manor, died yesterday at the age of 97. He had been living with his daughter, at Ellicott City.
NEWS
By Diane Mullaly | March 6, 1991
50 Years Ago (week of March 2-8, 1941):* Fire engine companies from Ellicott City, Sykesville and Sandy Spring battled a fire this week at Doughoregan Manor. The manor house and surrounding buildings were untouched by the flames, but nearly 150 acres of ground were burned in the two hours before the fire was brought under control. Doughoregan Manor was once the home of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, one ofthe signers of the Declaration of Independence. The estate remains in the Carroll family to this day.Information for this column was culled from the Howard County Historical Society's Library.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | larry.carson@baltsun.com | April 11, 2010
The plan to cluster hundreds of new homes in the northeast corner of historic Doughoregan Manor and preserve the rest of the estate took a big step forward Monday night when the County Council unanimously approved the extension of public water and sewer to the property. The next step is a county Zoning Board hearing May 12, when the board - composed of the five council members - will consider a zoning change for the land. The Ellicott City estate is the only home of a signer of the Declaration of Independence still in family hands, and the descendants of Charles Carroll have shown a determination for nearly 300 years to preserve their family home and keep the public away.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | larry.carson@baltsun.com | April 6, 2010
The plan to cluster hundreds of new homes in the northeast corner of historic Doughoregan Manor and preserve the rest of the estate took a big step forward Monday night when the Howard County Council unanimously approved the extension of public water and sewer utilities to the property. The next step is a county Zoning Board hearing scheduled for May 12, during which the board -- composed of the five council members -- will consider a zoning change for the land. The historic estate is the only home of a signer of the Declaration of Independence still in family hands, and the descendants of Charles Carroll, the signer, have shown a fierce determination over nearly 300 years to both preserve their family home and keep the public away.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | larry.carson@baltsun.com | March 28, 2010
Extending public water and sewer lines to allow 325 new homes at Doughoregan Manor appeared to get a boost Monday during a three-hour County Council discussion of the proposal to develop part of the historic Ellicott City estate. Every county official questioned by council members on issues brought up by critics said the Carroll family's plan is the best way to proceed, though some issues - such as what to do with wastewater - defy easy answers. Under the proposal, the new homes would be clustered in the northeast corner of the 892-acre estate, 34 acres would be donated for the expansion of a county park and the money raised through the development would enable preservation of the rest of the property.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV | john-john.williams@baltsun.com | March 21, 2010
Public testimony was split evenly last week over whether Howard County should negotiate an agreement with a developer that would allow construction of 325 homes at historic Doughoregan Manor while preserving most of the Colonial estate's remaining land. "We heard a lot of good testimony on both sides of the issue," said County Council Chairwoman Courtney Watson. She said the council will hold a work session Monday to address concerns raised during the testimony. Watson and the rest of the council heard from more than 50 people Monday and Tuesday nights about plans for the estate in Ellicott City.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | larry.carson@baltsun.com | January 24, 2010
Expressing fears about worsening traffic and suburban sprawl, most Howard residents in the standing-room-only crowd who attended Thursday night's county planning board hearing strongly opposed the Carroll family's proposal to develop part of historic Doughoregan Manor in Ellicott City. The nearly 300-year-old estate belongs to descendants of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. After an earlier deal fell through, the Carroll family wants to cluster new homes in the northeast corner of the 892-acre property to raise millions of dollars to preserve and restore the rest of it. The vigorous opposition - so many people attended that the hearing will continue Feb. 4 - contrasts with community acceptance of an earlier plan to use the land for an Erickson retirement community of 2,000 apartments.
NEWS
September 19, 2000
Howard County, which began July 4, 1851, as a western outpost of neighboring Anne Arundel County, has started celebrating its 150th anniversary this year. To mark the occasion and give readers a sense of what life was like in Howard County 150 years ago, the Howard County edition of The Sun will publish a column on county history and the people who were part of it. The column will appear every Tuesday through the school year on Page 3B. This week's column traces the role of Charles Carroll of Carrollton (above)
NEWS
By Nicoline Smits and Nicoline Smits,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 19, 2000
The Carroll family, which had a prominent role in the American Revolution, is part of Howard County history as well. In his 1975 book, "Charles Carroll of Carrollton: The Making of a Revolutionary Gentleman," Thomas O'Brien Hanley traces the history of the Carroll family in the Colonies to 1688. The best known member of the family is Charles Carroll of Carrollton, the only Roman Catholic signer of the Declaration of Independence. The name Carroll is an Anglicized version of O'Carroll, a prominent family in County Offaly in the Irish Republic, according to Paddy Heaney of the County Offaly Historical Society.
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